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7

It's likely since you are bottling directly from your fermentation vessel through a spigot that the spigot is low enough on the vessel that it is able to pull in a bit of the yeast cake as you fill your bottles. Each batches' yeast cake at the bottom of the vessel will vary in size depending on such things as: Original gravity Proteins and cold break in ...


6

You just need time. My experience is that making cider requires a schedule more like wine than beer. I usually give my ciders 1-2 months in primary and at least another 3 months in secondary. They turn out crystal clear.


6

Hygiene Hygiene Hygiene. Champagne yeast works well with apples. Pasteurize of the juice. There's a lot of nasties in natural fruit that will spoil the batch. Purists will probably tell you not to pasteurize, but I feel it's a necessary step. EDIT: This link says to pasteurize between 185 (85) to 200 (93) degrees. So the 165 degrees mentioned in the ...


6

Cloudiness in Beer Cloudiness in beer has several main causes. For some styles of beer, such as a witbier, it is desirable, and for others, it is regarded as a flaw. It is, therefore, important to understand what factors influence clarity and cloudiness of beer so that you can control the appearance of your beer as best possible. 1. Suspended Proteins ...


5

I don't think it matters all that much. I've entered and judged many comps and done it both ways. Chilling then warming will not adversely affect the beer. So I say follow your basic routine of chilling after carbing, then do whatever will work best for you.


5

If you've never home brewed before or have never opened a bottle of someone's homebrew, I understand this can be disconcerting. But if you really have followed all the instructions on your kit and been careful during your sanitization, then what you have in that bottle is real ale. Congratulations!!! Most home brewed ale will not clear up significantly ...


5

Easily put, chill haze is the result of haze-producing proteins that reside in the beer. They do not react unless chilled, at which point they clump together. At that point, they become visible enough to reflect light. Since the particulates are white in color, they give the appearance of haze. These proteins are slightly heavier than the beer, so given ...


4

Generally speaking, unless you take steps to clarify your beer, like resting the beer in a secondary fermenter, cold crashing it and/or adding clarifying agents, you can expect it to be cloudy. The junk at the bottom is called trub, it's mostly inactivated yeast and proteins, totally safe to drink. I say drink some now, and save some for a couple weeks. ...


4

I would use gelatin, isinglass or cold crash. If the apple juice was clear to begin with then the only particulate is the yeast, which you can either leave to settle out, or use finings to cause it to settle out faster. For tips on using gelatin, and other finings, see Fining Agents, improving beer clarity.


3

First off, I would expect to have sediment in the bottles if you bottle directly from the FV. Actually I am surprised that you havent had this before, probably the muslin bag was catching most of it. In addition, when I am bottling, I like to move my FV to it's racking location a day or 2 in advance of bottling so it has time to settle again after all the ...


3

Other than cold crashing and maybe filtering (although I haven't heard of anybody who has ever bothered to filter), I don't know of any other techniques. Do you think the cloudiness is from the juice (ie, was it there from the very beginning?) or residual yeast in suspension? Residual yeast is more responsive to cold-crashing, while protein/fruit ...


3

Look into Keeving. A brewer at my local club made an excellent, bright, crisp cider using this method. It may seem complicated but it's really quite simple (providing you can get hold of the PME enzyme it's just a matter of letting fermentation happen naturally and having patience). Read this link for details: http://www.cider.org.uk/keeving.html


2

Its possible that you haven't given the beer enough time to settle out. A hydrometer reading of 1.010 may indicate that fermentation is done. But there is likely still plenty of stuff still settling out. I'd recommend moving the fermentor to someplace cooler than fermentation temps, as this will help promote the settling of stuff. If you have a secondary ...


2

The simple, easy way to get rid of chill haze is to cold condition the beer for a couple months.


1

You're right - normally you'd store it cold so it can drop clear before packaging. With a wheat beer you don't want or need to do that, or at least not to the same extent. Note that in a wheat beer the haziness comes from both the suspended yeast and the protein in the wheat malt. It takes a long time for the protein to drop out - several weeks, and at ...


1

I don't think its really necessary to store beer before bottling. When the beer is done (another topic all together) its usually ready to go into the packaging phase. If you are observing best practices already with fermentation and the like store it to wait for something mysterious to happen isn't necessary. That said, a week in storage isn't going to ...


1

I liked the simple answer, it was very informative. The most fun way to get rid of chill haze is to pour the home brew into an opaque container, and drink it.


1

In addition to what Brandon said, pH in the mash and kettle has a huge effect on beer clarity. get the pH into the 5.4 area and your beer will be much clearer. It isn't alwyas practical to use ingredients with lower protein levels without significantly altering a recipe.


1

I find 24 hours in the fridge (not the door, too much movement) before serving will help the sediment to congeal at the bottom of the bottle. Carful pouring will give you a relatively clear result. This is not ideal for brews best served at room temperature, but excellent for ciders and lagers.


1

How did you chill your wort? Long, gradual cooling will not remove as many haze-forming proteins as a quicker temperature drop will.


1

There are some good related answers. Use the search. Here are two to get you started. Cleaner wort out of the Kettle How do you filter at home?



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