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10

OK, you asked me to leave it as an answer, so here it is: In this order: 1. It's cold. 2. It's got alcohol. 3. It's got enough sugar to go well with Wheaties or is neutral enough to work with Froot Loops. Basically, that means just about anything. 4. Lightly hopped. Hops are tough on morning mouth. But then again, the antibacterial properties in hops ...


8

For me, a good breakfast beer is something I can handle in the morning, or with a hangover. While strong is fine, if I can taste alcohol, it's not going to end well. Mkeller's beer geek breakfast, for example, has too strong an alcohol taste to be a good breakfast stout. I think something malty with smooth flavors works best. Bitter hops just won't do at ...


5

Web Some websites are better than others for this, but there are some great resources out there for clone recipes. There are the "industry" sites, like BYO, that list recipes. There are forums, like Homebrew Talk, that have great discussions about various clones. And there are recipe sharing sites, like BeerTools.com and Beer Calculus, that have some great ...


3

I haven't tried that one, but traditionally I believe shandy is a mix of beer and lemon lime soda. i don't believe the lemon is usually fermented at all, although that may be how they do it with the beer you mentioned.


3

For clones, I don't think it's common practice to do so, and I don't think it needs to be. It's more of an homage and an effort of taste than a "knock-off" product. Like recipes more generally, and items of hand-crafted effort more broadly, you have to squint pretty hard to think the homebrew shop is "making money off of a brewery's work". Of course, if ...


3

Wow, that average pH is low compared to my water just over here in the Pittsburgh suburbs. Mine is 8.3. Your water is pretty neutral, mine is alkaline. Anyways, here's my suggestion: Don't adjust your water this time. Water adjustment is a pretty technical topic and if you want to start doing it, be prepared to experiment. I recently switched to all ...


2

Old question, but I'll throw out an answer: In Brewmaster's Table, Garrett Oliver recommended wits, hefeweissens, berliner weisses (wheat in general) to go with eggs. A wit or hefe does go beautifully with eggs/omelettes. If you're doing steak and eggs, that adds another layer of complexity. Most of those wheats won't stand up to beef, so I would go ...


2

Your Ca is a bit on the low side, as is your SO4 for a hoppy beer. Your mash pH will likely be OK, so I'd add a tsp. of gypsum to the boil for yeast nutrients and to accentuate the hops. Then, before you brew again, check out the water info on howtobrew.com and braukaiser.com.


2

Take a German beer and mix with soda or juice (Like lemonade). You now have a radler aka shandy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shandy I enjoy mixing a Hefeweizen and lemonade. Half and half is a good place to start.


2

You want to preserve the ratio of 2-row to Crystal 60L. Here is one simplified way to do the math. 2-Row has an average, theoretical extract yield of 1.036 specific gravity -- if you take the last two digits (36), you can express this as 36 gravity points per pound of grain per gallon of wort (PPG) at 100% efficiency. The recipe assumes a mash ...


1

Pelforth Brune is a great beer...I've been after a recipe for a long time. This is what I've found out about Pelforth. Pelforth is a Bock, which is closer to lager than ale. Pelforth, was first brewed in 1935 using two different types of malt and English yeast Alcohol Content 6.5 % Bitterness 21. EBU Colour 70.0 EBC It takes 43kg per hectoliter, that's ...


1

As I recall, it tastes a bit like someone dumped a bunch of Countrytime Lemonade mix into a light lager or a kolsch. You could probably do better by brewing your own lemonade with fresh lemons and adding that to the beer. Just remember to monitor the pH; most yeast don't like the conditions below about 3.4.


1

Books There are several books available full of clone recipes, such as Clone Brews or Beer Captured.


1

Trial and Error Understanding what goes into beer at a detailed level allows a brewer to taste a beer, look at the color, etc., and make educated guesses on how to mimic it. This is definitely advanced, but with practice, this is a great way to clone a beer.


1

Magazines Some magazines, like Brew Your Own and Zymurgy, provide clone recipes, as well as other recipes for the readers to try. This is a great resource, as they usually delve deeper than just the ingredients. They tend to explain the why of each choice, process, etc.


1

Any beer I drink with breakfast, of course.


1

I have found, on several occasions, that the Belgian Blonde / Tripel I make is excellent at breakfast. I've had it with pancakes -- it was wonderful! I've had it with sausages and eggs -- it was amazing! If I didn't have my own available to me I'd try one of these: Maredsous Tripel, Tripel Karmeliet, Saxo, Pranqster, Duvel. I'm sure lots of others would ...



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