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7

You don't need to do 90% of that. Surfaces need to be clean of matter before they can be sanitized. Things that are visibly dirty should be cleaned, but you don't need to – for example – scrub and soak your brew kettle before you use it … anything you add to it is going to be boiled, which will kill everything. The same goes for your rinsing bowl and ...


5

Have you tried using a percarbonate-based cleaner first? Usually an Oxyclean or PBW solution will break up the gunk in my tubing with a few hours of soaking.


4

You should probably just rack to a second sanitary bucket, especially if you plan to add additional sugar to the cider for carbonation. Ideally, you use a separate bucket with a spigot to which you can then attach a "bottling wand". This allows you to fill the bottle from the bottom upwards, which significantly reduces the amount of oxygen that is absorbed ...


4

I've had 5-6 cats and 2 dogs for the entire 16 years I've been homebrewing. They are no bigger threat to your beer than you yourself are. Use StarSan in a spray bottle to clean things, not toxic cleaners like 409 and Windex.


2

To use your template as a guide, here is how I handle each step. For the most part, "cleaning" is important prior to the boil, "sanitizing" is important for all post boil processes with the wort. For sanitizing, keep a pre-filled bucket of Star-San solution on hand. You can reuse Star-San as long as the ph remains at the correct level. UNIT CLEANING Brew ...


2

I'd be wary of using 409 or Windex for brewing purposes; find some proper homebrew-friendly cleaners and sanitizers (oxiclean free and star-san are awesome). There's no inherent incompatibility between homebrewing and pets. You might have to keep curious cats away from some brewing processes/steps, but if you're keeping proper sanitation and your head ...


2

You can do a pretty good job with soap and a high-pressure water, as long as you rinse it right away. As I mentioned in a comment on @BrianV's answer, Percarbonate dissolves best when the water is 140°F or higher, but the plastic they use in a lot of racking canes (esp. the auto-siphon) will begin to get cracks in it very quickly if you clean it with hot ...


2

Standard ways of cleaning barrels use really hot or boiling water to rinse and clean and/or using sulfur sticks. Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to completely sterilize a barrel. 10 years without being properly cared for is too long. The wooden staves shrink and I'm guessing it won't be able to hold liquid. Some breweries just rinse well with sterile ...


2

John Palmer says that Cleaning Plastics should be done with Percarbonates. A good application of elbow grease also works. :)


2

As long as you do not begin abrasive scrubbing until the PBW crystals are dissolved, PBW should not be a problem. Let me differentiate between HDPE plastic bucket fermenters and PET carboys (like Better Bottle). I find that I don't need anything other than hot tap water, a soft sponge, and a slight amount of elbow grease to clean HDPE bucket fermenters. ...


1

No, dissolved/dissolving PBW will not scratch your plastic fermenters.


1

Try this article. Most breweries are using a caustic clean solution I believe. The attached article talks about using a Phosphoric/ Nitric acid combination followed up with a non caustic alkaline based cleaner. These are serious chemicals however, be sure to take safety precautions when pouring, mixing and rinsing these cleaners. Serious chemicals for a ...


1

This is of course a judgement call depending on just how grim it looks and how large it is. But I would start with filling it with warm water and PBW, let it sit for an hour and then give it a serious scrubbing. When done rinse out the PBW and sterilize the barrel. Sterilization (or at least disinfection) can be done in several ways. In this case my method ...


1

Note: Not directly related but worth noting DOGS are generally allergic to hops, gives them sore skin. I don't know if the same is for cats. Correction: hyperthermia (overheating can result in death)


1

To clean up the bottles use dishwashing powder (the stuff you put in the auto dishwasher) as it will dissolve all the dried on beer residue quickly and it rinses off quickly in hot water. I usually add a good teaspoon or two to each bottle and fill with hot water and let soak. When I rinse I shake the bottles out hard and rinse 4 times. To sterilise - in ...


1

The technical definitions are as follows: A sanitizing agent removes 99.999% of organisms a sterilization process removes 99.99999999% of organisms. Seems like a small difference but I'd rather have that extra 0.00099999% if they are going to perform surgery or something. Also In the United States, items labeled as sanitizers are agents that destroy ...


1

There is no reason that a small amount of vinegar in a bottle would affect carbonation.


1

As others have said, wood and plastic may stain. That doesn't mean they are not clean. But to put your mind at ease a bit: You don't need to worry much about sanitation until your wort is cooling after your boil. Yes, you want things to be clean -- but the boil will generally take care of any bacteria that is introduced into a mash or extract before the boil ...


1

Anything somewhat porous and light colored can stain. White/light plastic often stains. White fermenting buckets often get hop stains. Wood spoons can stain also. Steel, glass and aluminum generally will not stain, although metals can get discolored for various reasons, usually having to do with oxidation. It will not affect the beer. For plastics, a good ...


1

The spoon is wood or plastic? stirring your wort or sweet liquor while boiling with a somewhat residual stain of some sort, within reason I suppose, will have no effect on the finished product. If you are worried, use a stainless spoon, great investment. Or just buy another plastic spoon, 2 bucks tops.


1

I quit using spigots because of the difficulty in cleaning them and the lack of necessity. You can use a wine thief for samples, and an auto-siphon works great for bottling (with the cane mdma mentioned). Also, spigots are too high, especially if the trub is low. I've seen all kinds of crazy bent tubes, etc, or tipping buckets to get at the wort, but an ...


1

If you don't want to rack to another vessel, then you can spray with warm OxiClean (or similar oxygen-based cleaner) or PBW (Powdered Brewery Wash - an alkali cleaner). Leave for a couple of hours and then spray with water. This will take away the residue. You can then spray with more OxiClean - in the recommended dosage it does in fact sanitize - I used to ...



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