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2

Short answer? Yes. In fact, I would move your cider to secondary. This is also a good time to dry hop it if that's a thing you want to do.


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Large plastic containers (especially food grade containers) usually make excellent fermentation vessels if a bubble trap is fitted or any closure/lid/cap is not fastened tight but can allow CO2 out as fermentation proceeds. Failure to allow CO2 to escape will cause bottle inflation and possibly bursting. Many home brews are made in 25 litre plastic buckets ...


2

Could be a yeast or could be lactobacilius - or both! Either way its going now and the only way to stop it is to pasteurise it. I would tend to let it go. As has been said, cider was traditionally made by crushing the juice and storing it in a vat to ferment naturally over some time. No yeast was ever bought or added. In the majority of cases the cider ...


3

Traditionally cider is made without pitching additional yeast. There is plenty of wild yeast on the apple skin. In fact apple skin is such a reliable source of wild yeast that it's often used for making a sour-dough starter. Unless you've taken steps to kill the wild yeast that's what the foam is and that is what will ferment your cider.


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You should be ok just using less than an 1/8th of it, but wouldn't do harm adding the whole pack. Just follow the pitching instructions on the yeasts datasheet. Hydration etc.


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If its food grade plastic then sure it shouldn't be a problem. I wouldn't recommend racking after a few days for no reason other than getting into a new container. You don't want to separate the cider (or beer or wine) from the fermenting yeast too soon. After a few days some of that yeast is likely to already be flocculating out, but its still active and ...


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I've been making apple wine for a short time. I've had good results so far using Fleischmann's baking yeast. I recently purchased a cider kit that came with cider yeast. I'll assume that will probably probably work good.


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Okay so for those that are reading this I have found the answers to these questions: How much yeast to 1 gallon of organic cider: 1/2 Packet of champagne yeast. How long to let it ferment for that beer taste: about 4 days. Once it is done fermenting do I need to do anything or just refrigerate it? YES! Remove the hard cider with a pump into another jug ...


0

You are better off to leave the pectolase on the apples before adding the yeast as the yeast will break down the pectolase. But you will be fine, I have added it after fermentation has begun before and suffer no ill effects.


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If it was from clear juice it may not need it at all. From fruit then go for it. Pectolase is fine to add at your stage but is better at the start of fermentation so the fermentation helps to keep it moving around, and the enzyme releases more trapped sugars so expect some more fermentation. You should be fine with some good swirling.


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Was wondering if you could answer the following: how much yeast to 1 gallon of organic cider. how long to let it ferment for that beer taste. Not worried about alcohol level. once it is done fermenting do I need to do anything or just refrigerate it? Can I start another jug with the fermented apple juice as a starter? Do I need to add yeast along the way ...



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