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7

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


7

Unless you were planning on heating the juice itself to a high enough temperature to kill anything in it, it's not really going to matter. Any bacteria or wild yeasts present on the inside of the carboy will also be in the juice itself already. If the juice is labeled as having been pasteurized, then it and its container are probably reasonably sanitary ...


5

'[C]an I add fresh squeezed apple juice the carboy to take up the space?' Sure, but introducing fermentable sugars (from the fresh juice) would re-start fermentation and defeat your stated goal of clarification. '[W]ater can be used, but it will dilute the cider.' Correct, and unless this is what you want, there's no reason to add water, ...


5

That's an insane amount of yeast for a one gallon batch. Your yeast ate through all the sugar quickly, and now it probably doesn't have anything left to eat. Do you have a hydrometer? If you don't, get one. That way you'll be able to measure the amount of sugar before & after fermentation instead of just guessing. Don't start over, and don't buy a new ...


5

Based upon what you said, namely that you only have the one container and it is currently filled with your cider, here are what I see for the pros/cons: Adding it directly to the bucket will give you a consistent carbonation because, as has been mentioned, you can make sure it is uniformly mixed. The downside to this is that you'll stir up the junk that is ...


4

There are two reasons: Force. Sphere is most resistant shape to crushing. That's why eggs are roughly spherical, and thin shell can support hen's weight, and more. Pressing whole apples would require much higher forces than pressing grounded ones. Efficiency. Grinding breaks peel, and to some extent it also breaks cell walls. It helps juice flow freely. ...


4

I would suggest the siphon, since usually they're designed to take (almost) all the liquid while sucking up minimal sediment. You probably have a little cap at the end of your siphon for that purpose. If your sediment reaches below 1.5" I guess it doesn't matter if you prefer the tap. However, you might leave more liquid behind that way, if you don't ...


3

The microbes that are present in the juice (from the skins of the apple and on the press itself) will eventually replicate and start to metabolize the sugars in the juice. If, by "bad", you mean "poisonous or harmful to you", then the answer is that it will not be harmful or bad, except for the harmful effects of alcohol. The acids and alcohol created by ...


3

If you carbonate it, that carbonation should give it a perceived fuller body. Aside from that, you could try adding some grape tannin or some acid blend, as those should help it feel fuller and more complex. Here's a pretty decent primer from the Norther Brewer on basic cider making that covers these points in brief: ...


3

A couple of things First, the "funky bittery, acetone-ish" flavors are most likely fusel alcohols that yeast likes to throw off when it's under stress. One way to prevent this is to make sure it has enough nutrients (particularly nitrogen). In the mead world, this is usually resolved with the addition of nutrients such as Fermaid K and diammonium phosphate ...


3

Apples are grinded first because it makes juice extraction and pressing easier. It is the same process with grapes and wine. Grapes are first crushed, macerated and then pressed. It also allows to get some juice to macerate the solids and extract flavor, color, etc. After pressing, the solids usually become compressed hard, making maceration ...


3

I wouldn't say it is a consensus, although it is not required all the time, there are cases where racking is usefull for beer as well: What's the point of secondary fermentation? A big difference between the process of making beer and wine is the time that the must/wort sits in the container (bucket/carboy/demi-john). Because wine will need more time ...


3

62F is a little low for S-04. Seeing how you already had some fermentation and yeast activity at the lower temp, ramping the temp up to 68F or 70F would be fine and I wouldn't expect any flavor issues at this point. Things should get moving again once the temp is up. If not once its warmed up (not before) you could go in with a sanitize racking cane and ...


3

Dead Yeast check expectation date. When you did your "30 min starter" was there foaming? If not it's likely the yeast was dead. "80°C" will kill yeast. If you added your yeast to 176°F cider, it's dead. Repitch your cider. Providing that was a typo, here's some other possibilities. Bad Fermentor Seal if there is a bad seal, the air lock won't function ...


2

There might be differences in a long run with pasteurized cider, but if you're planning to consume it within a year, you wont' see the differences. You might read this post from a guy who did like 20 different yeast on pasteurized and unpasteurized ciders. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=83060 One thing I can say is that I tried keeving on ...


2

While these are nice lists I would like to point out that you do not need a 5 gallon bucket and carboy. I like to experiment with new recipes using a two gallon bucket and an old one gallon apple cider jug. Cheap, easy, and provides 8 bottles of beer in much less (brew day) time than a five gallon batch.


2

Your cider is very young to draw many conclusions. In my experience, you have to think of cider more like wine than beer. Give it another 6 months of conditioning and it should taste better. You can add lemon, acid blend, grape tannin...a lot things to "liven it up". Start with a small amount, taste and adjust. But above all, give it time.


2

Sulphur is (unfortunately) a side product in some fermentations. Lagers also tend to throw a LOT of sulphur during fermentation! The good news is: If you can smell it, it means it is no longer in your cider! :) Unless you are making a very strong cider, I do not think that adding nutrients now will make a difference. Your fermentation should be nearly ...


2

Yes you can. Cider is often handled exactly like beer.


2

Artificial drinks - no Most of them contains preservatives that will kill your fermentation. And if fermentation will not be killed, sugar and water will imbalance original design of your recipe. Juices - no Juices are usually around 1.04 as far as I know, and you went with 1.06, so this will restart your fermentation and dilute the effect. Condensed ...


2

The tablets work pretty much instantaneoulsy, so as long as you crush the tabs well before using them (keep in mind that 1 will treat up to 20 gal.) and give then 5 min. to work, you'll be fine. As to your CO2 question, you need to have a CO2 tank to dispense. The sugar you added will carb the cider, but you'll lose it all if you don't add more CO2 to ...


2

Keep in mind that making cider is a lot more like making wine than making beer. I ferment my ciders for several months. That allows time for them to clear and for off aromas to ferment out.


2

Cider can take a while to ferment. Without a lot of the natural yeast nutrients from malt, cider can be a "slow" ferment as the yeast are at a disadvantage. At the same time, cider is mostly completely-fermentable sugars, so the yeast will get there, in time. Your best way to understand fermentation is gravity readings, accomplished by using a hydrometer: a ...


2

This is the technical answer: In order to find out when your cider is ready to drink or to bottle and how strong it is in alcohol, you really need a hydrometer. This is a floating glass gauge that tells you how much sugar is dissolved in the juice. You should check the OG(Original Gravity = concentration of sugar in the original apple juice) after ...


2

The acidity will mellow out in time. So high acidity means you will have to be patient, and let it age a few additional weeks or months. This other post also has a solution for this problem, either add some dry malt extract or some calcium carbonate: How to stop Cider becoming too acidic


2

The density of water at room temp is 0.998 g/cm^3. The density of ice is 0.9167 g/cm^3. Thus, one gallon of water very near the freezing point would create just about 1.09 gallons of ice. The most important part of this operation will be making sure you have some mechanism to relieve the pressure that builds up as the cider approaches freezing. If you are ...


2

What do you want out of your cider? Do you want to show it off or enter it in competition, or is it more for your own enjoyment? Depending upon what is causing the cloudiness, in most cases it doesn't affect flavor. There are a number of options for you if you want to go for that brilliant clarity, but if you just want something tasty to drink, I don't ...


2

The process used by many home brewers is roughly this: Boil the priming sugar with enough water to make a syrup. Cool the sugar solution and transfer to a clean, sterilized bucket Transfer the finished beer to the bucket, mixing with the sugar syrup Stir gently so the sugar is evenly distributed. Be careful not to splash as this will introduce oxygen and ...


2

When I think of "raking to a secondary" I can think of two reasons you would want to do this. #1-Clarity; racking gives the beverage more time for sediment to settle out. #2-Aging; depending on the beverage racking give it more time to age.


2

The Everything Hard Cider Book by Drew Beechum covers some history, taste attributes of different apples, how to taste cider, and how to adjust it to your taste. It covers some things that can go wrong and how to fix them. It contains many different recipes.



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