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10

B-Brite is an active-oxygen-based cleaner, and these do a good job of making the item sanitary. While they are not classified as sanitizers, that is mainly because of the formal requirements and certification procedures, but in practice they can do a good job of sanitizing. I know people that use only ChemPro, Oxiclean and other active oxygen based cleaners ...


6

Out of my 12-13 brews I have almost always had condensation on the inside of the lid of the fermentation bucket. I have had a thermometer inside the liquid during fermentation, and one on the outside and it does differ quite a bit. Basically the fermentation causes heat => condensation. Totally normal!


4

Dry apple cider usually takes several months to a year in the bottle to smooth out. I would not concern myself much with how it tasted at 4 weeks. If you want a sweeter cider that is ready to drink in 4-5 weeks, take a look at my answer in this question: Sweet sparkling cider without pasteurizing, sulphites or lactose Make a "graff" which is a malted ...


4

I don't really agree with your pro and con list. Assuming you're able to calculate the right amount of sweet apple cider to add for priming, and this should be fairly simple arithmetic based on brix and volume, there's no real difference compared to adding table sugar or dextrose. I'd suggest you keep things simple and use sugar for priming. If you're ...


3

Pectic enzymes and the polysaccharide that they break down, pectin, are naturally occurring in apples. To get them to break down your apples for juice, though, you would need to wait for the fruit to ripen to the brink of rotting. In your example, you would need to add pectic enzymes to the apples. The enzymes will break down the pectin and probably other ...


3

It's tasting like wine because there are almost no sugars left in the cider. With no sugar, you really notice the acidity in cider which makes it taste more like wine. (I would say it's more like white wine than, red, but that's subjective). You could try sweetening the it to see if that makes it taste more like cider, and less like wine. Buy a can of apple ...


2

I don't think that it will change from wine taste to cider taste. I have done the same thing using Lalvin EC1118 yeast which turned out to taste like wine. What is happening is the yeast had eaten all of the sugars in the cider giving it a higher alcohol content and the wine taste. If you used a different yeast then some of the sugars would have been left ...


2

The preferred choice of pears for making cider (or "perry") are collectively known as "perry pears". 'Abate Fetel', AKA 'Abbé Fetel', does not fall into this group. Abate Fetel is commonly described as "more sweet" than many other varieties, and because of this it is popular as one to eat rather than use for cider. The bitterness you tasted is more likely ...


2

The best way to increase the ABV of cider is to add more fermentables to it. Table sugar is most commonly used, although you can also use things like honey, agave syrup, etc.


2

I think it should be fine. Relax, don't worry, have ... some cider?


2

Yes. I've done this before with no ill effects. The apples will oxidize and turn brown over night but this doesn't affect the flavor of the juice. As long as you keep the pulp cool, no spontaneous fermentation will occur. I kept mine at a controlled 32 F., but anywhere below 50 F. should be fine for overnight.


2

Everything is fine. Apple juice is almost entirely fully-fermentable sugar; there's no real reason to add more sugar unless you want more alcohol. If you do add sugar, though, you should probably dissolve it either in the juice itself or some water, before adding it. Only 8 hours into the fermentation, you could probably get away with gently swirling the ...


2

No reason why not. It's just cider. Though the lees will give you some weird flavors. And bad gas.


1

Is it possible the barrel was previously lined with pitch? If so you might consider not using it. Pitch seals the wood and blocks the wood character from effectively aging the beer, as well as reducing porosity that contributes subtle oxidation and the development of microorganisms (all are primary reasons for barrel aging). Plus who want chunks of unknown ...


1

No. It can take longer to ferment, but in general the slower colder fermentation will result in a better tasting cider. I have used a few cider yeasts that ferment at a hotter temperature and they tend to give a bit of a sulphur taste. Now even if I use that particular yeast, one the fermentation has started to roll, I drop the temperature down to the lowest ...


1

Another common method would be freeze concentration, where you partially freeze the finished cider, and remove chunks of ice, concentrating alcohol and unfermentables in the remaining liquid.


1

The last time I had trouble with bottle conditioning, I agitated all of the bottles just a little bit. I picked up each bottle, tilted it to the horizontal, gave it a half-turn, then put it back into the box where I keep my bottles. In a few more days I had good carbonation.


1

It's unlikely that a coarse filter like a dish towel would remove all the yeast from the perry, but it could have removed enough to slow fermentation down. The other possibility is that there's lack of yeast nutrient, which would also cause slow fermentation. The first thing you should try is waiting longer. Keep the perry in a warm (~700 F.) place. Give it ...


1

Did you sanitize the kitchen cloth you use to filter? I always do the filtering when passing the wort to the primary because is easier and always with sanitized equipment. Next time try adding sugar to the whole beer (in the fermenter) instead to each bottle.


1

The safest thing, though it's a bit of additional work, is to sweeten the cider in the glass. Put an ounce or two of concentrated apple juice in the bottom of your glass before pouring a bottle of cider. This technique adds a fresh apple taste, doesn't introduce any artificial sweetener off flavours, doesn't involve chemical stabilizers, and has no risk ...


1

Any fermentable sugar you add will convert to alcohol and in turn create CO2. Any non-fermentable sweetner is a gamble on off flavors. A suggestion would be to allow it to finish dry, add a dose of potassium sorbate to prevent refermentation, add a tested amount of apple juice concentrate to your liking for sweetness, keg and force carbonate the batch. ...


1

If you take gravity readings, you'll notice that the final gravity is extremely low. Cider is notorious for fermenting very low, and you're adding to it by tossing in sugars which are 100% fermentable (meaning that 100% of the sweetness will ferment out). The reason it is "watery" on your palette is because there is no sweetness. I'd be willing to be you ...


1

My question is answered in the comments. I failed to compensate for the alcohol on the final refractometer reading. The answer is that the cider is done fermenting, having finished at around FG = 1.002. (For some reason I was mentally confusing wort correction factor that applies to beer but not fruit juices, as researched by Sean Terrill, with correction ...


1

Sad to say, but without gravity readings we know nothing. Bubbles are strongly correlated to active fermentation but no guarantee that it is of significant measure. That said, some buddies of mine who do cider give ridiculous cycles, up to and past five months IIRC.


1

All my ciders ferment dry, at or less then 1.000. Your temps need to be at least in the mid 60F for fermentation to continue. Once that is complete, the yeast will drop out over a month or so or you can use any number of finings to help it clear. I age my ciders for a year before bottling, age will make them smoother and I have found that the apple flavors ...


1

The sugar in apple juice is almost entirely fermentable, so most ciders finish fermenting with a specific gravity near 1.000. If you used a wine yeast, you can expect a very dry finished cider. Ale yeast flocculates sooner, and can leave some small amount of residual sugar. Regardless, your gravities are high enough that I'd say your cider is not done ...


1

The process of freeze distillation exploits the difference in freezing points of water and ethanol. Wikipedia has a good article that explains the process. The short explanation is that the frozen portion of the liquid has a lower concentration of alcohol than the liquid portion. By removing the ice, you can thereby increase the concentration of alcohol in ...


1

The test for acetobacter is simple: smell whatever's coming out of the airlock on your fermenter. If it smells like vinegar, you've got an infection :). For a fermentation in progress, there's only a couple of options. You could pasteurize the whole batch, which would kill off bacteria as well as the yeast, so you'd have to repitch your yeast. Another ...


1

You are too optimistic regarding your schedule. It's unlikely that fermentation will be finished in a week. Let the cider make the schedule, not the calendar.


1

Unless it's infected, definitely drinkable. More under the hard cider category. I guess you could say it's an apple wine, but like barely wines they are usually above 10% ABV. You normally shouldn't see any weird looking crusts or floating material depending on the yeast you used. I would swirl the cider around everyday to help keep the yeast in ...



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