Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

B-Brite is an active-oxygen-based cleaner, and these do a good job of making the item sanitary. While they are not classified as sanitizers, that is mainly because of the formal requirements and certification procedures, but in practice they can do a good job of sanitizing. I know people that use only ChemPro, Oxiclean and other active oxygen based cleaners ...


4

I don't really agree with your pro and con list. Assuming you're able to calculate the right amount of sweet apple cider to add for priming, and this should be fairly simple arithmetic based on brix and volume, there's no real difference compared to adding table sugar or dextrose. I'd suggest you keep things simple and use sugar for priming. If you're ...


3

Pectic enzymes and the polysaccharide that they break down, pectin, are naturally occurring in apples. To get them to break down your apples for juice, though, you would need to wait for the fruit to ripen to the brink of rotting. In your example, you would need to add pectic enzymes to the apples. The enzymes will break down the pectin and probably other ...


3

start with sterile carboy airlock funnel and cold pressed Apple cider. Don't use anothing that has preservatives in it. Pitch in a camden tablet per gallon of juice to kill any un-identified bacteria or yeast. Let sit for 24 hours. Then pitch in some champagne or cider yeast. Watch it ferment. Save some 2litre bottles in the meantime. When the brew is done ...


2

Everything is fine. Apple juice is almost entirely fully-fermentable sugar; there's no real reason to add more sugar unless you want more alcohol. If you do add sugar, though, you should probably dissolve it either in the juice itself or some water, before adding it. Only 8 hours into the fermentation, you could probably get away with gently swirling the ...


2

4 days of fermentation is a very short amount of time for a cider. Let it go. Add yeast nutrient if you can acquire it, ideally something with both general yeast nutrients (yeast hulls, vitamin B) and DAP. Cider does not really have all the things yeast wants to be healthy, and needs additional nutrients. Look in to "staggered nutrient addition" if you want ...


2

No reason why not. It's just cider. Though the lees will give you some weird flavors. And bad gas.


2

The best way to increase the ABV of cider is to add more fermentables to it. Table sugar is most commonly used, although you can also use things like honey, agave syrup, etc.


2

I think it should be fine. Relax, don't worry, have ... some cider?


1

You absolutely should have an airlock on your barrel. This allows fermentation to continue (fermentation halts under enough pressure). You will want to check the taste every month at minimum to see if it's too oaky. New barrels (barrels not previously used for whiskey or wine or anything) will impart much more oak flavor into your brew, so make sure you ...


1

In order to overcome the effects of the preservative you need to pitch more yeast than in a preservative free situation. Normally if you are pitching one packet of yeast I'd say do too. Having a good sized pitch of active yeast is a great idea too. You can start some liquid yeast in malt extract and 24-26 hours later pitch the whole thing. Its not ...


1

Your success will be affected mostly by the health of the yeast in the cider. If the yeast are healthy and vibrant, the added sugar should ferment quickly. If the yeast are less healthy, there may be a long delay before fermentation starts, it may proceed slowly, or it may even not start. The primary contributor to yeast health is age. How long has it been ...


1

I don't think you will have any issues with it. If you are concerned about sanitation you could always make a syrup by boiling the sugar with water, letting it cool then throwing it the cider. You could always just throw in without. I'm a pretty big sanitation Nazi, but when I make cider, i just throw in simple white sugar straight from the bag, and when i ...


1

The S04 yeast strain is notorious for dropping out with a temp drop. You have warmed it back up which is good. Now you need to rouse the yeast back into suspension. Either through some shaking or gently stirring if you can get a long enough implement into your fermentor. A little yeast nutrient/energizer would help too.


1

I think the initial fermentation failed to start for two reasons. First, you didn't pitch enough yeast. An 11g packet of dry ale yeast is intended to ferment 5 gallons of beer. So your 1 gallon jugs should have each received a little of 2g of yeast. Secondly, the ambient temperature was at the bottom end of the range for that yeast. Cold temperatures lead to ...


1

It could be oxidation causing the color change. This can happen if the cider is sloshed/splashed during transfers after fermentation is complete.


1

Probably nothing to worry about. As the yeast drops out of suspension, the perceived colour becomes darker, as less light is reflected by the yeast. The yeast in the darker batch is likely dropping faster than the lighter batch. Give them a few weeks and the colours should be the same.


1

Sounds like the yeast failed. additives: Pectolase, nutrition salts, 2 table spoons campden powder all added 2 days earlier Do you mean that these were added two days prior to pitching the yeast? Two tablespoons seems high to me. I often add no sulphite, it the apples were in good shape before pressing. Otherwise, I add one Campden tablet per ...


1

The apple juice might have some viable wild yeast present, or it may be yeast from the air inoculated the juice. Wild yeast has a low alcohol tolerance which it probably why your cider has been weak. You'll get better, more consistent results by adding cultured yeast. Champagne yeast is fine choice, if you like your hard cider without any residual sweetness, ...


1

Is it possible the barrel was previously lined with pitch? If so you might consider not using it. Pitch seals the wood and blocks the wood character from effectively aging the beer, as well as reducing porosity that contributes subtle oxidation and the development of microorganisms (all are primary reasons for barrel aging). Plus who want chunks of unknown ...


1

No. It can take longer to ferment, but in general the slower colder fermentation will result in a better tasting cider. I have used a few cider yeasts that ferment at a hotter temperature and they tend to give a bit of a sulphur taste. Now even if I use that particular yeast, one the fermentation has started to roll, I drop the temperature down to the lowest ...


1

Another common method would be freeze concentration, where you partially freeze the finished cider, and remove chunks of ice, concentrating alcohol and unfermentables in the remaining liquid.


1

The last time I had trouble with bottle conditioning, I agitated all of the bottles just a little bit. I picked up each bottle, tilted it to the horizontal, gave it a half-turn, then put it back into the box where I keep my bottles. In a few more days I had good carbonation.


1

It's unlikely that a coarse filter like a dish towel would remove all the yeast from the perry, but it could have removed enough to slow fermentation down. The other possibility is that there's lack of yeast nutrient, which would also cause slow fermentation. The first thing you should try is waiting longer. Keep the perry in a warm (~700 F.) place. Give it ...


1

Did you sanitize the kitchen cloth you use to filter? I always do the filtering when passing the wort to the primary because is easier and always with sanitized equipment. Next time try adding sugar to the whole beer (in the fermenter) instead to each bottle.


1

The safest thing, though it's a bit of additional work, is to sweeten the cider in the glass. Put an ounce or two of concentrated apple juice in the bottom of your glass before pouring a bottle of cider. This technique adds a fresh apple taste, doesn't introduce any artificial sweetener off flavours, doesn't involve chemical stabilizers, and has no risk ...


1

Any fermentable sugar you add will convert to alcohol and in turn create CO2. Any non-fermentable sweetner is a gamble on off flavors. A suggestion would be to allow it to finish dry, add a dose of potassium sorbate to prevent refermentation, add a tested amount of apple juice concentrate to your liking for sweetness, keg and force carbonate the batch. ...


1

If you take gravity readings, you'll notice that the final gravity is extremely low. Cider is notorious for fermenting very low, and you're adding to it by tossing in sugars which are 100% fermentable (meaning that 100% of the sweetness will ferment out). The reason it is "watery" on your palette is because there is no sweetness. I'd be willing to be you ...


1

You are too optimistic regarding your schedule. It's unlikely that fermentation will be finished in a week. Let the cider make the schedule, not the calendar.


1

What kinds of apples are you using? You could use additives to fix a batch but it's better to start out with a blend of apples good for making cider. Newtown Pippin makes a good single variety cider. My current batch on tap is a blend of Newtown Pippin, Black Twig, and royal gala. I split the batch and fermented it with two different yeasts. Half was ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible