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46

Brewing day Sanitizer - To sanitize all of your equipment. 6 gallon fermenter - For primary fermentation. Funnel or Tubing - To transfer from the brew kettle to the fermenter (pour or siphon) +3 gallon brew kettle - For boiling the mixture and making wort Thermometer - To monitor the temperature of the wort Hydrometer - To test the original gravity of your ...


20

I would point you to the Basic Starter Kit from Northern Brewer: http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/starter-kits/basic-starter-kit.html Some items are probably not STRICTLY needed, but for $80 you definitely get all the gear you would need to get started.


18

If I wash my hands regularly do I need to sanitize them as well? Do I even need to wash regularly, between touching everything? No. As long as you're not touching the insides of bottles, fermenters etc. you should be fine. Do I need to sanitize the rim of the mouths of bottles? Yes. Dipping the ends of the bottles into a container of your ...


15

First off, Simon, your answer was spot-on in answering Jarrod's questions with logical, proven answers. Props. However, Jarrod is asking for anecdotal advice, so here's mine: In practicality, you can actually often get away with a lot of carelessness. The problem, though, is this: while the risk is low, the stakes are fairly high. I absolutely hate ...


13

Temperature can often be the reason. I had a Christmas beer that didn't carbonate because my basement was too cold. I simply took the bottles to a warmer place and they carbonated in the normal time. Here are some reasons a beer won't carbonate: Temperature: If the beer is too cold it can put the yeast into hibernation. Warming up the bottle might be all ...


13

Following normal, reasonable sanitation practices (always sanitize containers and utensils immediately before use) usually keeps the risk of infection pretty low. The greatest risk of infection after containers and utensils is simply open air. Keep your containers covered while working, even if you're just turning away for a few minutes. Keep your empty ...


13

At a minimum you need: a fermentation vessel (carboy, better bottle, bucket, etc.) an airlock sanitizer apple juice with no preservatives yeast - dry yeast is good, try Nottingham (beer yeast) or Montrachet (wine yeast), not bread yeast bottles and caps capper (unless you have plastic soda bottles) 5-6 feet of 3/8" food-grade plastic tubing The basic ...


12

Assuming you're beginning from concentrated malt or a kit, and can figure out how to boil water on your own, The bare minimum: 5 gallon plastic (food grade container) with lid. Airlock for same. Bottles, and appropriate closures for them. Plastic hose for siphoning off of finished product. Disinfectant (chlorine or sulfite) Recommended: 5 Gallon ...


12

The first thing you must learn how to do is make a yeast starter. This is simpler than making beer but your sanitation must be very good, don't be intimidated. Yeast Starter Mix malt extract and water to make two quarts of 1.030 to 1.040 gravity starter wort. Consider optionally adding yeast nutrient. Sterilize this by boiling for 10 minutes. Cool to ...


11

Your starter size will vary with the cell count you are shooting for, which in turn will be determined by the original gravity of the wort, batch size, and whether it is an ale or a lager. Use Jamil Zainasheff's pitching rate calculator to determine how much yeast to pitch. As an easy to remember rule of thumb, use 10 grams of dry malt extract for every ...


10

I've made a few ciders and here are some things that I found. Apple juice is completely fermentable, which means it will dry out. More than likely this is what is giving you those "acidic" flavors. It's not so much acid, as it is a lack of residual sugars. To balance this you need to add something non-fermentable to it. Typically when I make cider I will ...


10

Different yeast does do different things when fermented in the same beer. Flocculation - Some yeast has high flocculation, which means that it collects or gathers together (I think of a flock of birds gathering). High flocculation is often desired because it leaves a clearer beer. However some beer styles want a low flocculation yeast (IE Hefeweizen). ...


10

Started doing hard ciders (apple and pear) last august and have learned a few key things. Using a juicer is just as good as using a traditional cider press. When you use the pressed stuff, you end up having the clarify the hard cider, while juiced apple cider is more clear. The taste between the two cider production methods is not significantly different. A ...


10

B-Brite is an active-oxygen-based cleaner, and these do a good job of making the item sanitary. While they are not classified as sanitizers, that is mainly because of the formal requirements and certification procedures, but in practice they can do a good job of sanitizing. I know people that use only ChemPro, Oxiclean and other active oxygen based cleaners ...


9

Most "conventional" homebrewing literature has you moving beer way to soon, IMO. You can almost never go wrong waiting longer. You can easily wait a month or more for beer in the fermenter without harm.


9

If you mean dry, french/english cider for drinking, then the most appropriate way in my opinion is: Specialty equipment Fermentation bucket sealed with an airlock and that has a tap. Yeast - preferably good quality cider yeast from a brewing shop. Racking cane / siphon. Bottling tool for easily bottling the cider. Go about it this way Collect apples. ...


9

I'm an inexperienced ciderist and I've been researching this very question for around two months. Many renowned cideries use champagne yeast. The thing to remember here is that champagne yeast is very aggressive and should ferment your must to total dryness (little/no sugar remaining, specific gravity below 1.000) So you may need to back-sweeten to achieve ...


8

Hopville lets you save recipes... it's not just a source of them, I often find that I can't find exactly the ingredients in a recipe. Also it will guesstimate Initial and Final gravity, color and other useful information.


8

If you can get Grolsch Amber in the 16 oz swing-top bottles, they are awesome. They're heavier-duty than most 12 oz non-returnables and with the swing-top you don't have to worry about capping (and most LHBSs carry the rubber washers for them if yours get old and crack). The only drawback is that the sides are not smooth, so on-the-bottle labeling doesn't ...


8

Go to www.cwcrate.com - there you can get some pretty cool plastic beer cases. They hold up really well too, I've been using mine for quite some time now and there no way they are going to fall apart. What's cool about them is that you can just take your case out in the yard, open it up and pour a bag of ice in and you're all set. Update: cwcrate.com is ...


8

Do not boil the cherries. Do not boil the juice, either. You will create pectin, which will cause cloudiness in the cider among other things. Instead, you have two options: 1) Bring the cherries and juice up to temperature (at least 150 degrees) and hold for 30 minutes (I've seen as low as 10). If you use pasteurized juice (no preservatives!), use 2 ...


7

Yeast is one of the most important components of a beer recipe. If you think about it, you do not make beer, you simply provide a friendly environment for yeast to make the beer for you. Different strains of yeast have evolved over the history of brewing, adapting to their breweries and being selected for different characteristics by brewers. The strain of ...


7

In general, your beer will be pretty forgiving. I once dropped a strainer into my fermenter when it was late and I was tired. So I rolled up my sleeve and grabbed it bare handed. My hands were clean but my arm wasn't. The only bad thing that happened is my arm was really sticky. Also, to clean my bottles, I just put them in the dishwahser on that really ...


7

Too bad this one is already answered because this answer is "the ticket". But hopefully it will be upvoted when you see the picture: Lay the keg on it's side and hook a wrench on one of the tabs. When you rotate the wrench, it pushes on the ball and the CO2 escapes. Easy, no fuss, no muss. Or maybe you'll down vote it for such crappy art work :(


7

Not necessarily. The addition of cinnamon sticks might have provided a nucleation site for the CO2 that was already dissolved in your cider from fermentation. Really, the best way to answer this is to take a gravity reading and check to see if it looks like you still have sugars left in your cider that can be fermented. Edit by request for more details: ...


7

Do nothing. That lacing is the residue of the foamy, yeasty head (krausen) clinging to the sides of the jug. There's no need to reincorporate it. Just let the cider finish fermenting.


6

Hygiene Hygiene Hygiene. Champagne yeast works well with apples. Pasteurize of the juice. There's a lot of nasties in natural fruit that will spoil the batch. Purists will probably tell you not to pasteurize, but I feel it's a necessary step. EDIT: This link says to pasteurize between 185 (85) to 200 (93) degrees. So the 165 degrees mentioned in the ...


6

I haven't ever been able to tell the difference between a pasteurized or non as a juice base in the final product. I've also made quite a few batches using store-bought, filtered, pasteurized juice (i.e. the big jugs of "no preservatives" stuff on the bottom of the shelf in the grocery store). THAT stuff still can make a good final beverage, but it turns ...


6

Campden doesn't kill cultured yeast, at least not at the levels you'd want to use it at without significantly hindering the flavor and aroma of your beer. The problem with using Campden (Potassium Metabisulfite) is that it adds significant levels of free and bound SO2 to your beer. This will cause your beer to smell and taste like sulfur. Wine is ...


6

Make a "graff" which is a malted cider. Get 2lb of dry light malt extract, boil it with an ounce of hops for 30 minutes max in about a gal of water. Pour 3-4 gal of generic apple juice (preservative free ideally) into a carboy, pour the hot wort on top. When it's cooled down a bit, pour in a packet of ale yeast like US-05. Bottle it after 3-4 weeks on ...



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