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8

Do not boil the cherries. Do not boil the juice, either. You will create pectin, which will cause cloudiness in the cider among other things. Instead, you have two options: 1) Bring the cherries and juice up to temperature (at least 150 degrees) and hold for 30 minutes (I've seen as low as 10). If you use pasteurized juice (no preservatives!), use 2 ...


8

Most "Chocolate" stouts get their flavor from a combination of roasted malts - chocolate malt, pale chocolate malt or coffee malt. There are delicious exceptions, like Young's Double Chocolate Stout. Nibs are dehusked, roasted cacao seeds. They are high in fat (relatively tasteless cocoa butter), which does not add much flavor and which might cause problems ...


6

For how much coffee to use, check out the recent "Can You Brew It" where they tried to clone Terrapin's Wake-n-Bake stout. They worked from the exact recipe as given to them by the brewer at Terrapin. You can even buy the same blend of coffee they use commercially, if that interests you. I just listened to it this week because I also have a big stout ...


5

Addressing your sanitation questions: Coffee: One of your questions, paraphrased: Should I worry about secondary infection from coffee in secondary? I'd say your risk, much like the risk of most things brewing, is not from the water, which you can pre-boil on the stove or in the microwave, or the coffee which will be subject to a pretty high temperature ...


4

Adding cocoa 8oz of cocoa powder to the boil has always worked for me. While cocoa has water solubility issues, adding it to boiling water/wort helps out significantly. There will be some sludge in the base of the kettle, but not the entire 8oz. The only other option is to use cocoa nibs in secondary and wait for the alcohol extraction to take place. But ...


2

I agree about extracts - they taste fake. You can buy cacao nibs online. Might be a bit late if you want to add them now, but if you're planning for a future batch I'd do this. Also, I don't know if there's one near you, but specialty food stores such as Sur La Table carry them. I commented on brewchez's answer about my experience with cocoa powder. If ...


1

The easiest way to do it is not add flavorings to the fermenter or kettle. Add them after the beer is fermented so you can test and control the amounts. After fermentation, before bottling or kegging, I pour 4 2 oz. samples of the beer. I does each with a different, measured amount of flavoring then taste. I pick the one I like best then scale that amount ...


1

My brewing buddy and I brew a chocolate oatmeal stout around this time each year. I add in a whole container of cocoa powder and I have never had any issues with astringency. I have tried both natural pressed cocoa and Dutch processed cocoa and haven't noticed a big effect on astringency. I typically add it to the boil, not sure if that may be the reason ...


1

I have not used this cocoa powder, but most cocoa powder that's not sweetened is fairly harsh, and needs a good sweetness backbone to push against. The astringency which can come from both acidic and alkali compounds could be also from the other grains in the grist as well as the chocolate.


1

Some elements in the chocolate are dispersed throughout the beer, so it does affect the FG in principle, but not by any appreciable amount. 8oz in 5 gallons would be much less than 1 gravity point. It could be a stuck ferment, or that your FG realy is 1.022 due to unfermentables. Try rousing the yeast a little and raising the temperature by 5F/2C which may ...


1

I've not used Horizon, but reviews show that it's not a citrus bomb, but on the whole neutral and clean, with some earthiness and spiciness. To my mind, those qualities are good with stouts. For the aroma addition, I would probably go with Wiliamette or similar hop (Ultra, Tettanger, Hallertau, Crystal, although that's a bit pungent) - Centennial is very ...


1

If your brother is a hop head what about doing a Cascadian dark ale (http://www.byo.com/stories/beer-styles/article/indices/11-beer-styles/2072-birth-of-a-new-style-cascadian-dark-ale) like Deschutes Hop in the Dark. I bet that would pair well with your chicory coffee. That way you get the best of all worlds, and the dark and roasted malt wouldn't ...


1

What if you made a chocolate tincture with cocoa and vodka, and then added that to the beer?



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