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11

Relax, don't worry Firstly, thirty minutes is not a long time. It's not particularly quick, but you're probably fine. Secondly, some pioneering Australian brewers developed a no-chill brewing method. Google it up. Cold Break Proteins coagulate during the cooling process. Because the coagulated particles of protein are heavier than the proteins ...


11

Whirlpool chilling utlilizes a pump and an immersion chiller. Many brewers that have an immersion chiller will find that an upgrade to a pump for other uses allows them to get better chilling from the immersion chiller. A whirlpool chiller uses a pump to pull wort from the base of the kettle, then returns the wort to the top of the kettle. The return is ...


6

I'm not a physicist, but I'd imagine you'd rather have a graceful bend in it. With a 90, I could see the wort slowing down at the bend. If I didn't have flexible pipe from which I could make a gentle bend, I'd consider using two 45's with a small piece in between. Full disclosure: I don't have a wort chiller; I'm just theorizing.


6

Easily put, chill haze is the result of haze-producing proteins that reside in the beer. They do not react unless chilled, at which point they clump together. At that point, they become visible enough to reflect light. Since the particulates are white in color, they give the appearance of haze. These proteins are slightly heavier than the beer, so given ...


5

It helps to get the wort moving around to cool evenly. You run the risk of introducing contaminates from the air or stirring utensil, but it's pretty low. Use a sanitized or boiled spoon.


4

Cooling your wort quickly causes cold break material to precipitate out of solution. It can then be left behind in the brew pot or easily strained when transferring your cooled wort to your fermenter. If you cool slowly, cold break does not occur and the proteins remain in solution. The end result is cosmetic - your beer may suffer from chill haze. That ...


4

Assuming that you have cleaned and sanitized the ice packs, this should work. Are you stirring the wort while it cools? I find this helps a lot, especially as the temperature cools. Without stirring the cooled wort will sit over the chiller and the center of the pot isn't as effectively cooled. Sticking your kettle in an ice bath once you get to the lower ...


4

When I was extract brewing, that's exactly how I did every batch. I put 2 gallons of Poland Spring in the fridge, then added that to the wort that I cooled down to 120F or so in the sink. Really worked a treat, and still made great beer. As for inducing cold break, I can't say if it's better or worse than using an immersion chiller, but I definitely got a ...


4

Plastics are a very controversial issue, and it is unlikely that we'll have a clear consensus on longterm safety anytime soon. Some plastics are unambiguously unfit for food use (especially at high temperatures), while others are likely fine. Generally speaking, the safest plastic container for no chill brewing would be a HDPE without plasticizers. If you ...


4

Ya know what? In reality, it just doesn't matter. I drop the same old funky immersion chiller I've been using for years into the wort. Then I take the output hose from my pump and clamp it to the side of the kettle, pointing kinda sideways below wort level. It's equally as effective as a friend's setup that's similar to a couple of your designs. Don't ...


3

You should be fine doing this. Don't aerate until the next day. For an added clarity benefit, if you are chilling all the way to pitching temp on brewday (or at least belo 130-140), you can 'decant' the wort the next day into a different sanitized fermenter and leave the trub behind. This can also help to aerate. FURTHER, this will also basically allow ...


3

I would pass on that technique. Most ice packs I have seen have weird textured surfaces. There is also embossed lettering on them too. The likelyhood of actually sanitizing all though nooks and crannies is low. Unless you are talking about sourcing some uber smooth surfaced bottles and freezing them it might be worth a try on a few brews. I suggest you ...


3

Seems like a good idea, especially if you tested it with boiling water it and it worked, and you sanitize it well. You would also want to make sure your siphon and tubing are all good for hot liquids. The only potential problem I can think of is that borosilicate glass (which I'm assuming is what your condenser is made out of) is very resistant to ...


3

You do need to adjust the recipe for process. However, I am sure what you are looking for is an adjustment rule to convert another brewers recipe to your process. Well there is no hard rule for that as everyone's process is different. You need to understand your system, brew the recipe once as is. Then re-brew the recipe with changes in hop amounts to ...


3

My answer would be to know your own brewhouse and adjust as you see fit. Home brewing is sometimes more of an art than a science - aromatics is a good example of that where precise control would require some kind of pre-analysis of the aromatic compounds, their rate of uptake and rate of volatilization. Even if you could nail it down to hard figures, you ...


3

There is no guarantee that spring water, especially if you collected it from a spring, is free of bacteria. But spring water is often super filtered or pasteurized and is much more likely to be free of contaminants. That said, I used to put my couple jugs of water in the fridge the night before. When I started the boil, I put the jugs in the freezer. That ...


3

It looks like I will be buying the Chillzilla after all for several reasons: I don't have a utility sink, so the backflush assembly necessary for cleaning a plate chiller is not available. As it is, I'll be running a garden hose from outside for my cooling water. The outside copper of the Chillzilla actually does serve a purpose. I intend to run the whole ...


3

A plate chiller or an ice bath are the best options. The plate chiller is FAST, and super small. Easy to store it on a bookshelf or something. You do need to have a hose hookup on the sink to make this work. Ice melts. Pretty good for saving space. It just takes a lot longer. An immersion chiller takes up a bit more room, and can get messy. Definitely ...


3

Whirlpool hops and flameout hops actually have different meanings although the names do not explain them very well. In professional brewhouses, the "whirlpool" is a large vat where the hot wort is separated from the trub by means of whirlpooling. It is still hot at this stage and will last approx. 1 hour. Typical homebrew procedures call for the wort to ...


3

The difference between flame out additions and whirlpool hop additions is a matter of time. The flame out hops spend a longer time in the unchilled wort thus breaking down the hop oils and reducing the amount of aroma they impart in the beer. When they are adding the hops to the whirlpool they spend less time in the hot wort thus maintaining more aroma.


3

I create a whirlpool in my wort while it is still boiling, and then drop the wort chiller in. The whirlpool lasts for quite a while, and helps to clarify the wort. I also do this when I've had to use an ice bath. But I'd recommend a wort chiller :)


3

In my experience, I never get a trub cone with the chiller in place. And I don't think you will. Too much turbulence as the wort whirlpools for a nice clean pot centered cone of trub. Of course the turbulence leads to great chilling via a great turnover of wort volume and surface area contact with the chiller. I only get a nice cone in a standard pot ...


2

The wort should be flowing through the copper tubing in this case, so heat shouldn't be an issue. Copper is also great because it transfers heat well. If you have a control over the flow rate of the wort, then the length isn't really that important. Realize that the longer the length of copper, the faster you'll be able to run the wort through and cool ...


2

The cooling rate is going to depend on how cold your cold water is and the flowrates of the hot wort and the cooling water. From my experience, I've had a hard time finding food-grade hose that can handle boiling liquid and still seal reliably against a plain copper hose. If you can get a barb fitting, you'll have an easier time. EDIT: I should ...


2

As brewchez mentions, whirlpool chilling typically uses an immersion chiller, however you can whirlpool chill with counterflow and plate chillers also. The principle of recirculating the wort is the same - the wort is pumped into the plate or counterflow chiller and back into the kettle, where it creates a whirlpool. When plate and counterflow chillers ...


2

Temperatures above a yeast's ideal range are not desired as they can cause off-flavours, temperatures below the advertised range will just put the yeast to "sleep", so should be safe to proceed. Going too low (sub-zero C) can potentially kill the yeast. If you're using a starter, I'd aim to keep the temperatures equal to avoid shock.


2

You may also find that an immersion chiller does not have to be a major investment. Where I live, my ground water stays fairly cool year round. So a simple immersion chiller is all I need to cool 6 gallons in about 15 min. I just purchased; 20' of 1/2" ID soft copper tubing (in a roll), a 10' roll of 1/2" ID clear vinyl tubing, a connection for a garden hose ...


2

I have a copper wort-chiller as well, but before I had it, I used ice to cool my beer. I would sterilize Pyrex glass containers, and put boiled-and-cooled water in them, and into the freezer a few days before brewing. I would put the pot in a sink full of cold water, and put the ice from the container into the pot (not the whole container). I just topped ...


2

I think it's just a matter of preference. If you rack to a carboy and store it cool, then the few microbes in the airspace will not cause too much trouble before morning. However, I personally feel that once the wort is ready to pitch it's preferable to pitch the starter then - even if it's only been stirring for 8 hours - since it ensures you have the ...


2

The downsides as far as I can see are (in descending order of severity) 1) Possible toxicity of the plastic. 2) Recipe alterations due to the continued elevated temps after the boil is over. 3) Risk for contamination. Right now, the current thinking is that "food safe", "heat resistant" HDPE plastics are OK for No Chilling. I am personally content enough ...



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