Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Is any of the advanced equipment really necessary? No, not strictly. But like any hobby, as we advance we acquire more gear. Regarding the chiller in particular, if you are performing partial boils of 3 gallons or less, then you can definitely get by without a chiller. I did just fine. But once I switched to all grain and the full-volume boils that ...


10

First off, you're going to want to figure out the immersion chiller's flow rate. Depending on your water pressure, tube length, and tube diameter, I think it could range anywhere from 1 gallon a minute to 10 gallons a minute. You can approximate it's output by timing how long it takes you to fill your carboy with a garden hose or sink, whichever applies to ...


6

I'm not a physicist, but I'd imagine you'd rather have a graceful bend in it. With a 90, I could see the wort slowing down at the bend. If I didn't have flexible pipe from which I could make a gentle bend, I'd consider using two 45's with a small piece in between. Full disclosure: I don't have a wort chiller; I'm just theorizing.


4

If you're doing 2.5 gallon boils, and then adding another 2.5 gallons of (say) 55F tap water, then you're final temperature will be around 133F - the mid point of 212 and 55. For ales, pitching temperature is recommended at 75F, so you'll need to leave the wort for a few hours to naturally cool, or submerse in an ice bath to accelerate the cooling. If ...


4

No, there is nothing necessarily wrong about using topping off water to cool your wort. But there normally isn't enough topping off water to cool the wort to pitching temperature by itself without applying an additional cooling method (the math is below). One reason to cool quickly to ideal yeast-pitching temp is to allow the yeast to get a nice head start ...


3

If you are using a grain bag wrapped tightly around the racking tube, it will clog very quickly. Also, flexible tubing draped over a kettle will collapse, or at least narrow, as hot wort is passing through it. You should use a rigid racking cane with a cap on the end that keeps the bottom of the cane raised from the bottom of the kettle by a few millimeters. ...


3

I do something similar, I keep my fermentor in a big rubbermaid bucket filled with cold water. If I need to make it even colder I drop in water bottles that are filled with ice, as they melt, I swap them out for others and put them back in the freezer. I don't have temp controlled fermentation (yet) and this method seems to help keep the ferm temp somewhat ...


3

I've been contemplating this myself recently. I've looked into induction hotplates, but I've found that they're too expensive for my blood. Here's what's on my list right now: Just grab a turkey fryer from Walmart that comes with a 7 gallon kettle ($60). Sure it's aluminum, but that makes it significantly cheaper. I've been using aluminum so far with no ...


3

For the record too, while an ice bath can cool just as fast as an "economical" version of an immersion chiller a plate chiller is much faster. Most plate chillers will take 5 gallons to pitching temp in less than 10 minutes. At least, that's been my eyewitness account with friends that use them. I plan to get one in the future too speed up my brew day.


3

There is no adaptor for that type of faucet that I know of. Maybe your bathroon sink has better potential. If it was me I'd cut in an garden like fitting under the sink in the actual supply to the sink. Of course it would have to be done on the quite side. But no one is ever going to notice it. By the time a landlord sees it he'd wonder if it was there ...


3

The Immersion Chiller is easiest to clean and the most reliable from a cleanliness standpoint. The efficiency and speed of chilling can be a bit troubling sometimes depending on the water from the taps temperature. You also have to dabble a bit in flow rates of the water. I find that I can run the water fairly fast for the first few minutes, but I really ...


3

I can chart a few big leaps in my homebrew quality over the years. Switching from immersion to counterflow was one of them. Getting a good cold break makes your beer clear. CFC use less water. My next chiller upgrade will be a whirlpool chiller.


3

I've used the bathtub method, a home made immersion chiller (IC) and a counterflow chiller (CFC). My beer improved by a great leap when I switched to the CFC. I have not timed it, however I estimate it takes me around 20 minutes to chill 10 gallons of wort. During the summer in this part of Texas the ground water is about 82ยบ making it pretty much ...


2

The wort should be flowing through the copper tubing in this case, so heat shouldn't be an issue. Copper is also great because it transfers heat well. If you have a control over the flow rate of the wort, then the length isn't really that important. Realize that the longer the length of copper, the faster you'll be able to run the wort through and cool ...


2

The cooling rate is going to depend on how cold your cold water is and the flowrates of the hot wort and the cooling water. From my experience, I've had a hard time finding food-grade hose that can handle boiling liquid and still seal reliably against a plain copper hose. If you can get a barb fitting, you'll have an easier time. EDIT: I should ...


2

I had the same faucet in my old apt and ran a hose from the bathroom.


2

My Therminator plate chiller gets hooked up to a utility sink that runs 3 gallons per minute. It chills an entire 5 gallon batch down to pitching temperature in 3-4 minutes. So, 9-12 gallons. If I was very concerned about saving water, I think I could get that down by using the Thrumometer, which would allow me to use the minimum possible flow rate to get ...


2

My immersion chiller spends about 30-35 gallons of water to chill down a five gallon batch. But the volume of water depends on the efficiency of your chiller. I used to use a 3/8ths 25 foot immersion chiller and I used more water. Closer to 60-70gallons. Now I have a 1/2inch 50foot chiller and its more efficient, i.e. less water consumed. So the amount ...


2

I bought 5 1-gallon jugs of spring water for my last brew. I used 2.5 gallons for the boil and then I had the other 2.5 gallons in the freezer chilling. Once the boil was done, the time in the ice bath was minimal because I had 2.5 gallons of very chilled water to top-off my wort with. So to answer your question, no, an immersion chiller is not "essential ...


1

While sugar solution is thicker than water, it's only by 4-10% for a typical brew, so I doubt that is your problem. It's more likely a partial blockage or a connection that is letting in air. One other thing that can cause a reduced flow - it's important to get all air out of the tubes that run from the kettle into the pump. I have the pump placed below ...


1

Tip for last degrees of chill with wert chiller Shake the chiller gently up and down to stir up the wort. Feel the temp of coolant coming out of the chiller to see if you are being effective. The coolant will heat up if you are cooling the wert.


1

A 90 degree elbow would restrict the flow a little bit, but I'm not sure that you would notice any difference. It also depends on the flow you're trying to achieve. Here's a link to a guy that did use a 90 degree arm (not sure if this is exactly what you're trying to do or not). If you're thinking about bending it by hand to achieve the gradual 90 degree ...


1

I never have the tap running at anything like full, and it normally takes around 30 to 40 minutes (depending on time of year, and therefore tap water temperature). It's a 10m coil of 10mm copper pipe, so that's about 32 feet of 3/8 inch pipe. I've never measured the exact amount I use, but I'd be very surprised if it was more than 50 litres (around 13 US ...


1

I too use a pump to recirculate water through my immersion chiller... without that I would use about 50 gallons or more... I'm not really sure... Once I added a pump and used ice water to recirculate, I dumped about 5-6 gallons (the first time you run it the water is extremely hot), and then closed the system... so I guess I use 5-6 gallons and about 30 ...


1

Just a note to mention that you'll get a much faster cooling rate if you keep both liquids in motion in opposite directions. You get this for free with a plate or counter flow chiller. For an immersion chiller, this requires moving the wort in the kettle in the opposite direction of the water flow thrugh the coil. You can do this either by stirring by hand, ...


1

I had the same faucet, too. I used an ice bath at first. Then, I had a utility sink installed in my basement, and now I run a tube from my kitchen down to my basement, where I hook up a plate chiller. I had considered a couple of workarounds: 1.) Splitting off the cold water under the sink with a wye connector and a stopcock. Pros: stays out of the ...


1

I have left my brewing spoon in the hot wort at flameout. Then as the chill progresses I can stir it around abit to get the cold wort away from the chiller and the hot wort in contact with the chiller. I have also picked up the chiller by the cold inlet tube and swirled the whole thing around a few times. That seems to work well too. So, you can manually ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible