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7

This MSDS sheet lists Capsaicin as mutagenic in bacteria and yeast, although it doesn't state specifically which strains and by how much. I think the relevant question is, how much is too much? Clearly chili beers can be made, but perhaps the levels of Capsaicin were not significant enough to hinder yeast activity. Given the amount and specific variety of ...


7

I would maybe add your hottest pepper to the boil. That way you aren't adding alot of vegetal matter to the boil. Sort if like using a high alpha hop. Then, I'd make a relish or mash of your less intense peppers and add that in secondary. Sort of like dry hopping. I would also consider serving this beer out of some poblanos if you can find some big ...


6

I've always just added chilies straight to the secondary. I've always used roasted anaheim peppers that i just toss into secondary, and never had any problems with infection or anything. They don't add a lot of heat though, if that's what your looking for. Then again, they're really mild. They contributed some incredible flavor though. I did about 5 ...


3

According to this professor at UNC, they make the extract with one pepper. For the calculation I'll assume that your beer can extract capsaicin from the pepper you use as efficiently as the lab extract (which is most likely not true, but it gives you a base to start from). This calculation is just a shot in the dark, but it makes sense to me: First, 1 ...


1

I think you are on the right track with tasting the brew regularly. I'd suggest actually doing the experiment in a one gallon jug. Wait to see how long it takes to get the pepper taste you are looking for. Then scale up the number of peppers to the full 4 gallons remaining. That way you'll get a little more control over the final product and potentially ...



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