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5

Get a freezer on craigslist. Find one cheap. 50-300 bucks depending on size, the deal, and condition. I see them for 100-150$ for the huge ones all the time. I have a 20 cu ft stand up. It's the biggest one you can get. Buy a temp controller online, a brewshop, or at a beverage supply place (~50-60$), and set it to desired temp. I use 55º, that's a good ...


3

The presence of yeasty dust in the bottle and some carbonation leads me to believe you can expect these to carbonate normally. I have lagered beer at controlled temps for at least 5 months and gotten successful bottle conditioning. Issues holding yours back are likely the temp swings. Move the bottles to someplace closer to 70F and try and hold them ...


2

I'm lumping bottle-conditioning in with cellaring. I live in New York and so space is at a premium, but what I'm most concerned about is explosions in the bottle-conditioning process. This is an imperfect solution, but I went with jumbo boxes from the Container Store. Pros: Stackable They each hold about a batch worth of bottles They're waterproof, with ...


2

I too bottle the beer and keep it in beer crates. In that way all the bottles stay standing the right way up and they take less space than the would if i kept them without the crates. Of course i have them in a small storage room we have where the temperature is 60-70ºF (16-21ºC). Though the bottles are mostly brown, so the beer doesn't skunk easily, and in ...


2

I started off brewing in a dorm room. If you bottle in 12 oz bottles it is more work, but they'll fit under a bed (or at least the one we had). You can easily fit batches of beer under there. Another good option is the bottom of the closet and stack things on top. For both, I like to keep them in the 24 bottle boxes you purchase new ones from.


2

After 5 months of cold storage, there would but next to no viable yeast left in the beer. Store it for a couple more weeks, somewhere warm, and you may get lucky. If not, you'll want to remove the caps, add a couple grains of dry yeast to each bottle, and recap. Don't worry too much about oxygen, as the renewed fermentation should consume any oxygen that's ...


2

These are the general criteria I use when determining if I should cellar a beer: Alcohol: The higher the alcohol content the better results from cellaring. A Weizenbock would be fine in this case. Flavor: Is there a big aggressive flavor up front that ruins all the other flavor? A good example is an IPA like Dogfish 120, when the aggressive sweetness dies ...


2

Over a week or two, the temperature swings wont make much difference since there is little flavor contribution from the fermentation that goes on in bottle conditioning - for a high gravity beer, the priming sugar represents only about 1% of fermentables. It sounds like after a week, fermentation of the priming sugar is pretty much done - the remaining ...


2

I personally don't think that natural carbonation or yeast in the bottle have much of anything to do with beer maturation upon cellaring. Yeast obviously plays a critical role in flavor development while making the beer and carbonating it. But I have never heard someone really say that force carbed beer and bottle conditioned beer tasted different. When ...


1

Here is a good article on aging beer from Ratebeer.com A few tidbits from the article, though you really must read it in its entirety: Things that make a good Aging candidate The higher the alcohol content of a beer, the better it will age. The higher the acid level of the beer, the better it will age. The most wanted acid in beer is lactic acid. It ...


1

I routinely leave dry hops in beers for months and get no vegetal flavors. When to dry hop it up to you. I generally do it in xfer to secondary just because I'm lazy...err, pragmatic....and want to get everything done in one step. From that point, the hops will be in there anywhere from 2-6 months.


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I have a section of my pantry that I use to ferment, once fermentation is complete I rack to corny kegs and store them under an end-table. About 8 kegs can fit under the end table, with two other kegs in my kegerator. I seem to be brewing more than I can drink, so I'm probably going to have to clean out a closet in the near future. I have one closet with 6 ...


1

While I have no means to store beer for longer than a few months, and don't "cellar" beer in a traditional sense (buying commercial microbrews for aging), I do bottle condition my brews in a closet that stays just below 70ºF for about 6-7 months out of the year. This is likely a unique case to my apartment/climate.


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I went on Craigslist and bought a Vinotemp wine cabinet. It is supposed to hold around 400 bottles of wine. I'm not positive but I think it was about $500 used. The whole setup was meant to store wine on its side obviously, and this is not optimal for beer. I went to the container store and bought some ventilated shelving. It's the kind of stuff you would ...



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