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If you didn't stir your priming sugar very well, it's reasonable to assume that it didn't mix into the beer completely. In your case, the larger bottles didn't get the level of sugar that you intended. You have to take the oxygenation risk if you're manually adding priming sugar. If you don't want to do that, then I suggest using carbonation drops.


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Beer needs to be warmer when you bottle condition. This allows the yeast to work hard at getting the priming sugar into CO2. However, too warm and the beer will stale faster. I recommend moving the box to a cooler area of the house (like a cupboard that is not against a wall that gets direct sunlight). DO NOT COOL THE BEER! Leave it for two weeks, then put ...


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In short: not with what you want to use. The carbonation (CO2) is formed as a by-product of alcohol forming from the yeast eating the sugar (less sugar and more alcohol = altered flavour) There is a way of doing it, using compressed CO2. This requires a carbonator and CO2 cartridges. It is worth the investment if you want to use the carbonator a lot, but if ...


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I'll assume this is not a very foamy beverage, and say: carbonate it like homemade soda. BTW- carbonation makes a drink more tart, so the flavor will change a little.


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It will be absolutely fine. Drink and enjoy. By dropping into the fridge so early you just caused the yeast to stop their work. By removing it and allowing it to warm you have restarted the fermentation. You could happily leave it out of the fridge for a few months and so long as the bottles can handle the pressure that could build you would have no issues. ...



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