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I always just boiled some sugar and water and dumped that straight into my bottling bucket and then siphoned the beer over it — since the tube is just hanging into the bucket at an angle it will swirl and mix the beer with your priming solution that you just boiled. Now you have an even amount of parking solution for each bottle and don't have to worry about ...


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With Kvass you don't want to wait longer then 3-4 days. In fact, all your fermentation should be done in 1-2 days in a warm place, that's why you don't really wanna go above 4%ABV. Then it should be cold-crashed for 1-2 days, filtered and consumed within another 3-4 days... It should not take longer then 7 days from making Kvass to finishing a last pint of ...


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I don't think you can mess up priming that easily as long as you don't massively over-prime. I think standard rule of thumb is 3/4 cup of corn sugar or 2/3 cup of cane sugar per 5 gallon batch. But those aren't perfect equivalents; if you use cane sugar, use about 90-95% of what you would use for corn sugar. Personally I tend to carbonate with closer to 2/3 ...


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Gratz on your first brew! When bottle conditioning you want to make sure you have an even mix of suspended yeast and priming sugar. Having a secondary vessel makes this easier usually a bottling bucket is preferred. Bottle conditioning is simply feeding the yeast a little more to get some fermentation in the bottle to produce carbonation. Carbonation drops ...


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Could try pushing the CO2 out of that beer and re-presurizing over a longer period of time. I do 24 psi for 48 hours. Could try that to get new gas in your beer.


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Could it be an issue with a poorly cleaned keg? I've noticed off flavors when I've gotten lazy with cleaning seals / poppets etc. before. Otherwise time in a keg does tend to mellow out the flavor, but if you are tasting keg I'm not sure it will mellow too much more than it is now.


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You shouldn't taste your keg. If you taste something that shouldn't be there, maybe it's a sanitizer or something that was previously in the keg? For beers I do, I think CO2 adherence to the beer improves with time spent in the keg. CO2 forced in doesn't seem to absorb as well as CO2 absorbed over several weeks in a cold fridge. Without knowing your ...



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