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7

I can't imagine anyone suggesting bottling at a FG of 1.042 I would return them to the fermenter and allow fermintation to complete. Those are bottle bombs. Be careful. Many yeasts don't survive at 6.5% ABV, but there are plenty that do. Wine yeasts for example. At 1.042 we would call that a stalled or stuck fermentation, and a more tolerant yeast can be ...


6

Having done both, I can tell you that sugar (corn or table, doesn't matter) is the way to go. It's easy reliable and tasteless. Priming with gyle (the name for what you propose) is uncertain and offers no advantage to your beer.


4

Usually its fine. There's plenty of yeast around for carbonate, but it will take longer. You should still be bottle conditioning at 60-70F to get the carbonation to happen. If you lager a beer for a real long time, say months, a dose of yeast may help. One way to do this is to just rack some of the settled yeast along for the ride as you transfer the ...


4

Using sugar is easier. There is no risk that you have too much gyle or too little. You can just buy extra sugar and be on the safe side. Gyle needs to be saved in sterile containers (I usually fill a few bottles with gyle while it's still boiling hot, which does the trick) and then kept in the fridge. You can just keep the sugar on the shelf. You can end up ...


4

Force carbonation is very common for homebrewers. I'd imagine any homebrewer with a kegging setup does force carbonation by default. I would guess, too, that it's much more often than not done without active filtering. Long primary, cold-crashing and careful racking will minimize the amount of yeast transfer for most styles and beers. There is no signficant ...


3

Relax. As stated yes your beer is carbonating during all stages of fermentaion, as c02 and alcohol is by product from yeast consuming sugars. But the beer won't hold the carbonation since it's not in a sealed container, nor should it be (it's not recommended for a novice brewer, but can be done). So the beer should be "flat" during fermentaion, as in not ...


2

The release of CO2 can take certain volatile aroma compounds with it. Sometimes this is a good thing (it can strip sulfur notes out of beers) but can also take hop aroma compounds, less than ideal if it's dry-hopped or heavy on late-addition hops. In this case you might notice a slight loss of hop aroma. Any foaming caused by degassing will also affect the ...


2

Priming sugar will give you a very controllable, repeatable result with minimal to no impact on flavour, aroma or mouthfeel. Inconsistency when using this method is entirely down to process (i.e. inefficient mixing). Using Gyle (held wort) is a perfectly acceptable method as well, that will adhere to the German purity law (should that be important to you or ...


2

"At 10 °C and 5.6 atm, a cooled champagne bottle (V = 0.75 L) would contain ca. 9.5 g of dissolved carbon dioxide (Table 2) [3]. Once the bottle is opened the CO2 pressure falls to at most 1 atm. Solubility considerations dictate that at 10 °C no more than 1.7 g will remain dissolved, so roughly 8 g of CO2 must suddenly be set free. This quantity of CO2 ...


2

There is a common factoid that oranges are usually sprayed with fungicides for transport. If you do not wash them enough, some of it may end up in your mead and kill your yeast. My friend, who happens to be catering technician, always washes them for good few minutes using brush, if she wants to use zest for anything. Even longer before we put it in my beer.


2

This is the technical answer: In order to find out when your cider is ready to drink or to bottle and how strong it is in alcohol, you really need a hydrometer. This is a floating glass gauge that tells you how much sugar is dissolved in the juice. You should check the OG(Original Gravity = concentration of sugar in the original apple juice) after crushing....


2

Cider can take a while to ferment. Without a lot of the natural yeast nutrients from malt, cider can be a "slow" ferment as the yeast are at a disadvantage. At the same time, cider is mostly completely-fermentable sugars, so the yeast will get there, in time. Your best way to understand fermentation is gravity readings, accomplished by using a hydrometer: a ...


2

It's not impossible but your equipment won't work well for this process. First point- if you want more control over the carbonation, you'll need a pressure gauge to see how carbonated the cider is (before you bottle). Otherwise the old ferment-add sugar-bottle routine will give better control over the carbonation. Second point- that fermenter you're using ...


2

You can certainly add it to carbonated beer. I prepare my gelatin in water heated slowly to 150F. Stirring it until its totally dissolved, then letting it sit at room temperature for 5 minutes to be sure the dissolved gelatin has completely hydrated. Open the keg top and pour it in. Reseal, purge with CO2 quickly and shake it around some to be sure its ...


2

It's possible much of the yeast dropped out and thier wasn't enough in suspension. Generally if you bottle condition you accept there will be a yeasty ounce of beer in the bottle. That being said to help make sure your Lager bottles get a dose of yeast some of the secondary yeast should be transfered to the bottling bucket or stirred up when adding the ...


2

Gratz on your first brew! When bottle conditioning you want to make sure you have an even mix of suspended yeast and priming sugar. Having a secondary vessel makes this easier usually a bottling bucket is preferred. Bottle conditioning is simply feeding the yeast a little more to get some fermentation in the bottle to produce carbonation. Carbonation drops ...


2

It's hard to say an exact or even a close general time. If the whole fermentation hasn't gone more than a month or so you may still have enough yeast in suspension. Typically if the mead or beer is very clear it won't have enough yeast to condition. Cold crashing or other finings will drastically reduce your chances of good bottle conditioning. I'm ...


1

If it recommends a Champagne bottle, then an flip top bottle would be risky. Not so much as the style of cap, but for the thickness of the bottle glass. Champagne bottles are rated for about 90 psi, while others are a fraction of that. Champagne use cork and cage, some use lambics use cork and normal cap. This video best illustrates the difference ...


1

I agree that it's hard to say, but in general you have a long time. I have had lagers at 35F for 2 months and they carbed fine with no need for more yeast.


1

It is hard to generalise as Evil Zymurgist says. You are best off checking the number of yest per ml, with a haemocytometer and a microscope if you have such devices available. As long as you have ~100,000/ml then you will be good to bottle condition most ales with those in suspension. If you have less than this then best to add a little extra. Also, if you ...


1

While c02 does absorb easier at colder temperatures, I doubt you would get inconsistency if they are fully conditioned and chilled completely. The extra chill time could be it just finishing conditioning, as many yeast will still be active at fridge temps. Possible causes could be conditioning wasn't complete or different amounts of yeast or fermentables in ...


1

The beer should carbonate fine. I've personally had pilseners lager for four months and had no problems with carbonation. It usually takes a a few more weeks than ales, my four month lager took almost 6 weeks before it was properly carbonated. My friend lagered a doppelbock for 6 months, bottled it without adding any yeast, left the bottles for a few ...


1

To answer your question: Yes. You can add gelatin to a carbonated, kegged beer. I've done it before, actually quite a bit. One thing to be cautious of, adding gelatin to a carbonated keg will causing the beer to foam rapidly. If you do it, I suggest pouring the gelatin in with one hand, and having the lid to the keg in the other hand, ready to quickly ...


1

The general rule of thumb is that temps above 80F will promote staling and reduce the shelf life of the beer. I doubt that a week or so at that temp or slightly above would be too detrimental, though. I don't think you'll have any problem at all carbing at 78F.


1

Use sugar, and use a calculator like Northern Brewer's to calculate the proper amount to avoid gushers or bottle bombs.


1

Put in an unfermentable sugar prior to carbonating, like lactose. Or sweeten it, carbonate in the the bottle and then pasteurize in a dishwasher to kill the yeast before it consumes all the sugars. Obviously you'd need to do this in glass bottles and it the right temperature. Personally, the single time I've made bottle carbonated cider I was perfectly ...


1

Carbonation can be used in the same way as temperature is used to mask flavours. Just as the colder a beer is the less flavour is noticeable, the more carbonation the less mouth feel, texture, and flavour you will detect. To test this out, try a can of warm flat Coke. Very sweet, much smoother. Franklin has already answered the degassing part. Also I'm not ...


1

Franklin is right about how much carbonic acid is actually in the beer. The formation of carbonic acid is pretty much irrelevant. But... The formation of carbonic acid isn't that slow, it's just hard to get CO2 into solution without some agitation. Soda fountains mix CO2 and water just before the soda comes out, and by the time it hits your cup it's all ...


1

You shouldn't taste your keg. If you taste something that shouldn't be there, maybe it's a sanitizer or something that was previously in the keg? For beers I do, I think CO2 adherence to the beer improves with time spent in the keg. CO2 forced in doesn't seem to absorb as well as CO2 absorbed over several weeks in a cold fridge. Without knowing your recipe,...


1

I keg most of my beer, but the tabs work great for me because sometimes I like to pull a few bombers before kegging this way I do not have to prime a full batch! If you plan on full batch bottling I think sugar is more consistent and easier to measure carbonation per beer style,



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