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8

Yes, this is to be expected and perfectly normal - when you have a half filled container of beer, the carbon dioxide that's dissolved in the beer will come out of the beer to fill the space available, so you have less carbon dioxide in the beer, and less fizz. You can try keeping the half-filled bottles cool which will retain more carbon dioxide in the ...


8

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


6

Here's a list of some common gasses and their solubility in water at standard pressure and various temperatures. CO2 dissolves ca 3g per gas kg of water at 5°C. Nitrogen is 0.027g for the same conditions, so in round figures about 1/100th the solubility. A carbonated beer is a supersaturated gas in solution, having more gas dissolved than would be ...


6

My capper does this too. It's not been an issue for our beer. If it was leaking I'd think you might see some evidence around the top.


5

It's probably just too cool. I had lots of problems with carbonation when I left my bottles in my 65-70 degree basement. In fact, I had one batch where the bottles on the concrete floor did not carbonate but the ones sitting on top of those, off the floor, did carbonate. Eventually, I started putting them in the laundry room on a shelf above the dryer, where ...


5

My experience has shown that going through the beer out line doesn't change the rate the beer carbs up. Whether using the 'set and forget' process, or the high PSI and shake method. The bubbles coming out the bottom really aren't increasing the surface ratio enough for it to be significant. The bubbles just rush up to the surface. The downside to the ...


5

Let's separate this out into two phases: carbonation and dispensing. Carbonation inside a keg can be done just like carbonation inside a bottle: by the addition of a specific amount of sugar, which will be fermented by the residual yeast, which will create a specific amount of CO₂, measured in "volumes". With external CO₂, however, you can also "force ...


4

You might just need more time. I usually let mine go for 7-10 days total before. 5 days seems a little short to me even with your 30PSI upfront charge.


4

You're on the right track, but DME is around 80% fermentable, so you wouldn't get much residual sweetness. Using a blend of lactose and sucrose (table sugar) might work. The sucrose will ferment producing a small amount of alcohol and carbon dioxide. The lactose will not ferment and will provide residual sweetness. You could also try an artificial ...


3

For what it's worth, I usually set mine at 40psi for 24 hours, then 20psi for 24 hours, then 10psi for 24 hours, and fine tune from there. I usually serve at about 8psi. Naturally, I pour myself a pint at each interval for quality control purposes. ;)


3

If you saw a beer head during the 2nd fermentation, you likely just let the beer get too cold. Ales tend to like 70F+ bottle fermenting conditions. You can tell if your beer's yeast has died by the foam created when mixing in sugar. The reaction will always create alcohol and CO2. The reaction creates bubbles, which make the foam during fermentation. ...


3

Take them out of the fridge if you'd like. Maybe leave one or two in as a "control" to see how the carbonation differs between the 3 groups. Skunking has nothing to do with entering and then exiting a fridge, and everything to do with light interacting with hopped beer.


3

Be patient. It will carb, it will just take longer. Wait another week or so, then start sampling to see if it's carbed yet.


3

The beer inside a keg should (and virtually always will) be fully fermented and carbonated if you're dispensing it. This is how beer in a commercial keg comes. In the situation I think you're referring to, CO2 or a pump is simply used to add/maintain enough pressure within the keg to push the beer out and into a glass. CO2, when applied at the right ...


2

Apparently the lower pressure can cause the beer to lose carbonation faster, causing foamers. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/effects-altitude-carbonation-1523/ It might also be an infection. Did you notice any change in flavour?


2

It's no problem carbonating half a keg, other than you use twice as much gas (you still have to fill the whole keg of gas at the same pressure.) For me, a refill for my 20lb CO2 tank costs about $120 so it's quite expensive. So, to get the most from the CO2 I'd just make up a full keg of syrup and carbonate that. Give your customer the half keg he wants and ...


2

The best solution is to drink the full liter.


2

I suspect it has to do with the ratio of liquid volume to gas (head) volume. When bottling each bottle has a certain amount of headspace, while when kegging the amount of headspace relative to the liquid vloume is much smaller since there is only one vessel. Now, I am not talking about the speed of carbonation, just the final result (the equilibrium): ...


2

The carbonation process shouldn't matter with respect to your altitude. Inside your keg is a closed system. So the same rules of temperature and pressure applied will get you the same volumes of CO2. The rate at which the beer 'de-carbs' in the glass IS effected by your altitude however. So if you find that the beer is getting too flat to quickly, well ...


2

Ehhhh, not having 50 points... Either way, I would HIGHLY recommend not opening up the bottles and adding anything, or taking anything else out. This is just asking for contamination or at least oxygenation. Warm the bottles up a bit should work. Or letting them sit longer works too. Also, the yeast that is left in suspension when bottling is normally the ...


2

I would assume higher pressures aren't used because of the greater possibility for overcarbonation. If you carbonate a little too long at 20 PSI your beer will be less overcarbonated than if you overcarbonated at 40 PSI. The room for error/deviation is greater at a lower PSI. Perhaps there is a more scientific answer...


2

This is called "back sweetening", and you can look it up for a more authoritative answer than mine. As far as I know there are three approaches (purely from reading books and recipes, I've never actually back-sweetened myself): Add sugar right before you drink it. Add non-fermentable sugars or sweeteners. I've seen lactose most commonly recommended. ...


2

Five gallons worth of priming sugar going into four gallons of beer is most likely your problem. The possibility of inadequately stirring it into the beer before bottling (surprisingly not all that uncommon for beginners) may exasperate the problem to the point of bottle bombs. If over-carbonation is a common problem for several of your bottles, you may ...


2

Carbonation can have a dramatic effect on beer flavor. I suspect your beer is overcarbonated and that's the cause of the off flavor. You can reduce the carbonation by allowing the keg to warm up to room temperature and periodically venting the keg as the CO2 comes out of solution. As suggested by @Pepi, use this chart to determine what you should set your ...


2

Assuming the same beer properties, the surface tension should be equal between force carbonation and bottle carbonation. Assuming equal surface tension, the CO2 bubbles should be equivalent in size. With equal temperature, pressure, time, and surface tension, the CO2 bubble size should be equivalent.


2

It depends entirely on what you mean by 'the nature' or 'quality of of the carbonation'. If we're talking carbonation and only carbonation (literally the level of dissolved carbon dioxide in the finished product, usually expressed as volumes of CO2/volume of liquid, or as parts per million) there's no difference between reaching that by bottle-conditioning ...


2

If you took a specific gravity reading before you bottled and were confident that it was at final gravity, de-gas a sample and take another gravity reading now. If it's the same, it's over-carbonated. If it's noticeably lower, then some other wild yeast or bacteria else has likely got a hold of it.


2

A week might not be long enough (especially if your yeast is particularly beleaguered, which would depend mostly on what the ABV of the finished beer is and how long it's been since fermentation). Also, make sure your bottles are in a warm enough area (~70 deg. F is ideal for bottle-conditioning). Lower than this and it can definitely take several weeks, ...


2

It could be that there was an insufficient amount of active yeast in the beer when you bottled it. You could try this: Uncap each bottle Add two or three grains of dry yeast Recap the bottles Keep somewhere warm for a week or two. The other possibility is that the alcohol percentage in the beer is high enough to kill any yeast. If the beer is above 10% ...


2

The yeast that carbonates your beer should already be in suspension, that is, invisible without a microscope. So, unless you've filtered the beer, don't worry about the yeast. Don't stir up the yeast cake either, those might not be very happy/tasty. But, you should stir the sugar into the beer to get good carbonation, as discussed here and in many other ...



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