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TAKE THE STOPPER OUT! THIS IS A SERIOUS ACCIDENT WAITING TO HAPPEN! Unlike glass bottles, glass carboys are not designed to hold pressure. 4 tsp in 1 gallon will produce about about 2.4 volumes of CO2. The pressure created will be significant - at a minimum 22 PSI, but likely more than that, since fermentation proceeds quicker than the CO2 will dissolve, ...


5

It does sound like your priming sugar wasn't mixed very well. That said, if the flat bottles are sweet to the taste there's something else afoot. When I bottle I usually mix a cup of water with 3/4 cup of corn sugar and stick it in the microwave for a couple minutes to boil it. I then let it cool for a while before pouring the solution into the bottom of ...


5

Overview You carbonate partially filled bottles as if the bottle were full of beer, so if you have 1 liter of beer in a 3 liter bottle, you carbonate as if you had 3 liters of beer. Here's why. The amount of carbonation is measured by the equivalent volumes of CO2 dissolved in the beer. So a beer carbonated to 2.5 vols, has 2.5 times the volume of CO2 ...


5

If you follow a process like this, you won't be far off: Dilute the syrup to create a 10% solution. E.g. add 10g of syrup to 90g of water and stir well. Take the specific gravity of the 10% solution, e.g. 1.030 Express this as a fraction of a 10% solution of sucrose, which has specific gravity 1.040. So, our example of 1.030 is .75 the gravity of a 10% ...


4

Priming sugar amount depends on carbonation level, that is Total carbonation = CO2 already in beer + CO2 from priming sugar CO2 already in beer depends on the temperature you bottle at CO2 from priming sugar is proportional to amount of sugar used Total carbonation is expressed in volumes (Vol) and depends on beer style. You can find all this taken ...


4

In short, no, not if you're using an airlock. You need pressure to reach the levels of carbonation required. With an airlock, you only get atmospheric pressure, so the pressure inside is the same outside. Carbonation is measured in volumes of CO2. 1 Volume of CO2 is the same volume of CO2 as beer - 2 volumes would be twice the volume of CO2 as beer at ...


4

Glass carboys are not rated for pressure, I would definitely not recommend trying it there. If fermenting or finishing in a metal vessel (like a corny keg), you can use a spunding valve to control the amount of pressure in the keg to force carbonation, similar to actively adding CO₂ to the keg to force carbonate after fermentation. It's a practice born out ...


3

http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php is my go-to carbonation/temp/pressure table. Set to the appropriate pressure for the carbonation level appropriate (or desired) based on style, leave the pressure on, and let set for a few days. Once carbonated, drop the pressure down to something to maintain headspace-pressure, and/or use the appropriate line ...


3

Yes, the process sounds reasonable, at least to an extent. The purpose of storing them at room temp is to allow refermentation to create carbonation. Then, ideally, you would keep them at 32-35 for two months to allow the beer to lager and the flavor to smooth out. An even better course of action would be to transfer to a secondary, keep that at 32-35 for ...


3

The CO2 won't keep the gelatin suspended - it will sink as normal. The CO2 pressure is evenly distributed throughout the keg and applies pressure equally in all directions. There's no more CO2 pressure pushing down than there is pushing up, so Gravity will still produce a downwards force, and the gelatin will sink.


3

I often dry hop in the keg without issues. The carbonation should not be a problem since the CO2 is in equilibrium - it's balanced between the beer and the headspace so it's not entering or coming out of solution. It won't make a difference to the hop aroma. Just be careful when putting the hops in the keg, since they may cause it to foam up - lower them ...


3

A typical 20 liter batch uses around 120g of table sugar, or 6g per liter. One teaspoon of sugar is about 4.2g. So when you used 0.5tsp in 750ml that's 2.1/0.750 = 2.8 grams per liter, which is less than half the typical 6 grams per liter. For 1.5tsp in 1250ml, that's 1.5*4.2/1.25 = 5g/l so much closer, but still undercarbonated - it's quite hard to measure ...


2

These are very thick bottles. While I wouldn't let them pressurize forever, if you keep them cold, wear leather work gloves, and bring them outside in a bucket of ice water, you should be able to open them safely (and messily). I also recommend using safety glasses. For safety (and cleanliness) reasons, I wouldn't try to save them. You might be ok if you ...


2

If the beer has not fermented in the 3 weeks since bottling, it's not likely to kick off any time soon. Assuming that the beer is not excessively high in alcohol, you should add more yeast to the bottles to initiate fermentation. Get yourself a packet of dry yeast (check the manufacture date or expiry date to be sure it's fresh yeast). Uncap the bottles ...


2

edit: I should make clear that this is obviously not ideal, but the question is if it can be done effectively. Yes. The two main things to watch out for are too much pressure (so you don't get beer all over) and sanitation. For pressure: Remove the C02 and bleed the gas down for a few days (if time permits) - also cool the keg as much as you can to ...


2

It'll work fine without a filter. Your main problem is going to be oxygenation. When pouring the beer into the keg, take care not to splash, as this will increase the amount of oxygen dissolved in the beer. Dissolved oxygen causes the beer to go stale faster than it otherwise would. It won't be possible to entirely prevent oxygen from entering the beer, as ...


2

@nhunsaker this sounds pretty standard to me. Most instructions on a beer kit will get you to prime the bottles with sugar for carbonation, then to store them in a warmer place so the carbonation process can start to take place. Then you are told to leave the bottles for two weeks in a cooler place. After that you can put them in the fridge then drink ...


2

Use either beer or champagne bottles. Wine bottles are not designed to withstand the pressure and coupe explode. Beer bottles will be easier to cap. If you use the champagne bottles, you'll need to either buy or rent a corker. Corking is more hassle than capping, so unless you prefer the champagne bottles for presentation, I'd go the easy route. I've ...


2

Getting metric to imperial is hard to find at the best of times. Finding one for a CO2 connector is going to be very unlikely. As gas connections are normally a speciality thread (often the opposite direction thread, turn clockwise to undo. This is so idiots don't try to screw a bolt in or something) Do a quick google to find the thread specs, and then ...


2

Check that your glass is totally clean and free from oils and detergent. I doubt the beer lost it's head because of overcarbonation (and I don't think you've overcarbonated.) Even if you did, wheat beers tend to be served with medium-high to high levels of carbonation. The head stability is produced from proteins and hop acids. Looking at the recipe in the ...


2

As you drink the beer, more CO2 needs to be put in the keg to maintain the carbonation level. For beer at 65-75F°F, that's quite warm, and you'll need around 25psi to maintain the carbonation level. My guess is that you weren't holding the keg at this pressure, so it slowly loses carbonation as the beer is consumed. Dispensing at this pressure can be ...


2

That's a rather simplified set of guidelines for carbonation levels. Different styles have different historical ranges of volumes of CO₂. I'd start there (or from a similar source), and then use the PSI/temp/volumes table to find the right values.


1

You didn't say what the PSI was on your regulator. It sounds like no CO2 was going into the keg or too little. What did you set your gauge at? How did the beer come out of the faucet or picnic tap? was it slow, or fast? If it was slow, then I would say your priming sugar worked and your keg held a seal. But over time you created more headspace in the keg ...


1

Measuring out individual bottles can itself lead to inconsistency - it's hard by eye to measure .35 tsp. It's best to boil all the priming sugar for your batch in water, let it cool a little and add that to the bottling bucket as it fills with beer from the fermentor. I imagine that's more likely the cause of the inconsistency, or if fermentation ...


1

No, dry hopping has no effect on carbonation. It does increase foam retention because the hops bind the proteins in the beer to increase foam production and retention. You should calculate the amount of priming sugar based on the volumes of CO2 you want and the temperature of the beer. Since it's a lager, you've likely been fermenting it cold (if you've ...


1

In my experience, no, it isn't a normal practice to adjust a beer recipe to solely account for carbonation. OTOH, I build recipes that will taste the way I want them to taste when I drink the beer, so in that case I guess you could say I do adjust. I think the bottom line is that it's up to you. If you feel that the carbonic acid adds a bite you don't ...


1

You could do without priming, it's just not practicable. If you have a quick fermentation sample and know what the final gravity will be, you can check on the fermenter every couple of hours and when the gravity gets close enough to the FG, you bottle. In German, this is called Grünschlauchen. In real life, your need for sleep, a day job, social ...


1

As Thomas answered, safety is paramount right now. Glass shrapnel is a serious reality, and you don't want that in your eyes, hands, face, anywhere. Wear gloves, wear glasses, I'd even recommend a jacket/sweater when venting to keep shrapnel out of your arms/torso. Keep your beer as cold as possible to slow down fermentation. Store them away from ...


1

I have two lines coming from my CO2 regulator. My kegerator can only hold two kegs at a time. What I do is put two kegs in the kegerator and force carbonate them at serving temperature with lower pressure. Any additional kegs that I should happen to fill up stay outside of the kegerator for force carbonating with higher pressure. Maybe you would be ...


1

Yes, you are correct. Without some other source of C02, the beer will lose pressure as the level drops, and it will stop coming out of the keg altogether soon. Can you post a link to the "5 gallon plastic keg with tap" in question? I can't imagine why anyone would sell a keg that can't be charged, and I've never heard of a 5gal plastic keg vessel either. I ...



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