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8

Yes, this is to be expected and perfectly normal - when you have a half filled container of beer, the carbon dioxide that's dissolved in the beer will come out of the beer to fill the space available, so you have less carbon dioxide in the beer, and less fizz. You can try keeping the half-filled bottles cool which will retain more carbon dioxide in the ...


6

Here's a list of some common gasses and their solubility in water at standard pressure and various temperatures. CO2 dissolves ca 3g per gas kg of water at 5°C. Nitrogen is 0.027g for the same conditions, so in round figures about 1/100th the solubility. A carbonated beer is a supersaturated gas in solution, having more gas dissolved than would be ...


6

My capper does this too. It's not been an issue for our beer. If it was leaking I'd think you might see some evidence around the top.


5

If you follow a process like this, you won't be far off: Dilute the syrup to create a 10% solution. E.g. add 10g of syrup to 90g of water and stir well. Take the specific gravity of the 10% solution, e.g. 1.030 Express this as a fraction of a 10% solution of sucrose, which has specific gravity 1.040. So, our example of 1.030 is .75 the gravity of a 10% ...


5

It's probably just too cool. I had lots of problems with carbonation when I left my bottles in my 65-70 degree basement. In fact, I had one batch where the bottles on the concrete floor did not carbonate but the ones sitting on top of those, off the floor, did carbonate. Eventually, I started putting them in the laundry room on a shelf above the dryer, where ...


4

Yes, perfectly normal. It may be done carbing or it may take a few more days.


4

Glass carboys are not rated for pressure, I would definitely not recommend trying it there. If fermenting or finishing in a metal vessel (like a corny keg), you can use a spunding valve to control the amount of pressure in the keg to force carbonation, similar to actively adding CO₂ to the keg to force carbonate after fermentation. It's a practice born out ...


4

You might just need more time. I usually let mine go for 7-10 days total before. 5 days seems a little short to me even with your 30PSI upfront charge.


3

Take them out of the fridge if you'd like. Maybe leave one or two in as a "control" to see how the carbonation differs between the 3 groups. Skunking has nothing to do with entering and then exiting a fridge, and everything to do with light interacting with hopped beer.


3

http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php is my go-to carbonation/temp/pressure table. Set to the appropriate pressure for the carbonation level appropriate (or desired) based on style, leave the pressure on, and let set for a few days. Once carbonated, drop the pressure down to something to maintain headspace-pressure, and/or use the appropriate line ...


3

Yes, the process sounds reasonable, at least to an extent. The purpose of storing them at room temp is to allow refermentation to create carbonation. Then, ideally, you would keep them at 32-35 for two months to allow the beer to lager and the flavor to smooth out. An even better course of action would be to transfer to a secondary, keep that at 32-35 for ...


3

If you saw a beer head during the 2nd fermentation, you likely just let the beer get too cold. Ales tend to like 70F+ bottle fermenting conditions. You can tell if your beer's yeast has died by the foam created when mixing in sugar. The reaction will always create alcohol and CO2. The reaction creates bubbles, which make the foam during fermentation. ...


3

For what it's worth, I usually set mine at 40psi for 24 hours, then 20psi for 24 hours, then 10psi for 24 hours, and fine tune from there. I usually serve at about 8psi. Naturally, I pour myself a pint at each interval for quality control purposes. ;)


2

@nhunsaker this sounds pretty standard to me. Most instructions on a beer kit will get you to prime the bottles with sugar for carbonation, then to store them in a warmer place so the carbonation process can start to take place. Then you are told to leave the bottles for two weeks in a cooler place. After that you can put them in the fridge then drink ...


2

As you drink the beer, more CO2 needs to be put in the keg to maintain the carbonation level. For beer at 65-75F°F, that's quite warm, and you'll need around 25psi to maintain the carbonation level. My guess is that you weren't holding the keg at this pressure, so it slowly loses carbonation as the beer is consumed. Dispensing at this pressure can be ...


2

That's a rather simplified set of guidelines for carbonation levels. Different styles have different historical ranges of volumes of CO₂. I'd start there (or from a similar source), and then use the PSI/temp/volumes table to find the right values.


2

Getting metric to imperial is hard to find at the best of times. Finding one for a CO2 connector is going to be very unlikely. As gas connections are normally a speciality thread (often the opposite direction thread, turn clockwise to undo. This is so idiots don't try to screw a bolt in or something) Do a quick google to find the thread specs, and then ...


2

Apparently the lower pressure can cause the beer to lose carbonation faster, causing foamers. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/effects-altitude-carbonation-1523/ It might also be an infection. Did you notice any change in flavour?


2

It's no problem carbonating half a keg, other than you use twice as much gas (you still have to fill the whole keg of gas at the same pressure.) For me, a refill for my 20lb CO2 tank costs about $120 so it's quite expensive. So, to get the most from the CO2 I'd just make up a full keg of syrup and carbonate that. Give your customer the half keg he wants and ...


2

The best solution is to drink the full liter.


2

The carbonation process shouldn't matter with respect to your altitude. Inside your keg is a closed system. So the same rules of temperature and pressure applied will get you the same volumes of CO2. The rate at which the beer 'de-carbs' in the glass IS effected by your altitude however. So if you find that the beer is getting too flat to quickly, well ...


2

I suspect it has to do with the ratio of liquid volume to gas (head) volume. When bottling each bottle has a certain amount of headspace, while when kegging the amount of headspace relative to the liquid vloume is much smaller since there is only one vessel. Now, I am not talking about the speed of carbonation, just the final result (the equilibrium): ...


2

Ehhhh, not having 50 points... Either way, I would HIGHLY recommend not opening up the bottles and adding anything, or taking anything else out. This is just asking for contamination or at least oxygenation. Warm the bottles up a bit should work. Or letting them sit longer works too. Also, the yeast that is left in suspension when bottling is normally the ...


2

I would assume higher pressures aren't used because of the greater possibility for overcarbonation. If you carbonate a little too long at 20 PSI your beer will be less overcarbonated than if you overcarbonated at 40 PSI. The room for error/deviation is greater at a lower PSI. Perhaps there is a more scientific answer...


1

Yes it's normal and although a lower temperature will keep more 'fizz' in the beer it will still lose most of it. The carbon dioxide that was forced to dissolve into the beer when it was sealed will be able to return to being a gas when the bottle is half empty. Although you could try various things to avoid losing the carbonation once opened the best thing ...


1

Could be any number of things. Style of beer, some styles require more/less carbonation and pressure. Could be a kink or something in the line that causes the beer to bubble/foam in the line on the way out. Maybe try hooking the keg up to one of your other faucets?


1

It really depends upon how long it was between when you added priming sugar and put them in the fridge. If it were 3 or more days, then you can just leave them there. The question is really if the yeast had enough time to turn the sugar into CO2. This goes pretty quickly - just a few days if fresh yeast is used, but old yeast will take longer. The ...


1

Aerobic is for propagation, anaerobic converts sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide. I doubt a small amount would hurt, like from transfer or minor splashing, but if you intentionally injected oxygen, like how you might aerate the wort prior to fermentation, I would imagine it would not carbonate well and produce a lot of yeast, giving it a "yeasty" ...


1

Jedi Jay brough up a good point about the glass, possibly being not rinsed well and having residual soap. this could also happen when cleaning bottles. I once allowed my bottles to soak in a bleach solution that was too strong and didnt do a good job of rinsing, under the false impression that the bleach would evaporate on the drying tree. Let me tell ya, I ...


1

Take a look at this BeerSmith article: http://beersmith.com/blog/2008/06/25/enhancing-beer-head-retention-for-home-brewers/ The article makes the following points: Foam is the result of CO2 bubbles rising through the beer. These bubbles attach themselves to substances in the beer and form a skin around the bubble Head stability depends on the ...



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