Hot answers tagged

8

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


7

I can't imagine anyone suggesting bottling at a FG of 1.042 I would return them to the fermenter and allow fermintation to complete. Those are bottle bombs. Be careful. Many yeasts don't survive at 6.5% ABV, but there are plenty that do. Wine yeasts for example. At 1.042 we would call that a stalled or stuck fermentation, and a more tolerant yeast can be ...


6

Having done both, I can tell you that sugar (corn or table, doesn't matter) is the way to go. It's easy reliable and tasteless. Priming with gyle (the name for what you propose) is uncertain and offers no advantage to your beer.


5

Let's separate this out into two phases: carbonation and dispensing. Carbonation inside a keg can be done just like carbonation inside a bottle: by the addition of a specific amount of sugar, which will be fermented by the residual yeast, which will create a specific amount of CO₂, measured in "volumes". With external CO₂, however, you can also "force ...


4

Using sugar is easier. There is no risk that you have too much gyle or too little. You can just buy extra sugar and be on the safe side. Gyle needs to be saved in sterile containers (I usually fill a few bottles with gyle while it's still boiling hot, which does the trick) and then kept in the fridge. You can just keep the sugar on the shelf. You can end up ...


4

Force carbonation is very common for homebrewers. I'd imagine any homebrewer with a kegging setup does force carbonation by default. I would guess, too, that it's much more often than not done without active filtering. Long primary, cold-crashing and careful racking will minimize the amount of yeast transfer for most styles and beers. There is no signficant ...


3

It will be absolutely fine. Drink and enjoy. By dropping into the fridge so early you just caused the yeast to stop their work. By removing it and allowing it to warm you have restarted the fermentation. You could happily leave it out of the fridge for a few months and so long as the bottles can handle the pressure that could build you would have no issues. ...


3

Commercial kegs in distribution, either in transit or in waiting to be put on tap in bar are … exactly the situation you describe. It will be just fine. You don't really need to add any additional headspace pressure over the pressure to reach you intended carbonation level. Hop flavors fade over time, of course, but that's unrelated to your question.


3

It depends on how your system is configured, mainly on the length, inner diameter, and material of the liquid lines. This article explains it better than I could. Most home draft systems seem to settle in somewhere between 8 and 12 PSI. You don't need to turn off the gas. There is only so much CO2 that will dissolve into the beer at a given temperature and ...


3

Beer needs to be warmer when you bottle condition. This allows the yeast to work hard at getting the priming sugar into CO2. However, too warm and the beer will stale faster. I recommend moving the box to a cooler area of the house (like a cupboard that is not against a wall that gets direct sunlight). DO NOT COOL THE BEER! Leave it for two weeks, then put ...


3

Be patient. It will carb, it will just take longer. Wait another week or so, then start sampling to see if it's carbed yet.


3

Your general understanding is pretty much spot-on. I think the thing to consider here is that your reasoning assumes that half or a third of the priming sugar is meant to yield the same amount of carbonation as it would in the bottle. I'd argue this isn't the case. Notice how recommendations like this keg-underpriming 'common wisdom' usually don't go so far ...


3

The beer inside a keg should (and virtually always will) be fully fermented and carbonated if you're dispensing it. This is how beer in a commercial keg comes. In the situation I think you're referring to, CO2 or a pump is simply used to add/maintain enough pressure within the keg to push the beer out and into a glass. CO2, when applied at the right ...


3

Relax. As stated yes your beer is carbonating during all stages of fermentaion, as c02 and alcohol is by product from yeast consuming sugars. But the beer won't hold the carbonation since it's not in a sealed container, nor should it be (it's not recommended for a novice brewer, but can be done). So the beer should be "flat" during fermentaion, as in not ...


2

You can also try storing the bottles upside down for a week or two. I have had great success with this in the past. I assume it has something to do with the smaller area for the yeast and sugar to settle. One side note, once carbonated you'll need to turn them back over to resettle or you'll have the yeast ring around the bottle mouth.


2

It could be that there was an insufficient amount of active yeast in the beer when you bottled it. You could try this: Uncap each bottle Add two or three grains of dry yeast Recap the bottles Keep somewhere warm for a week or two. The other possibility is that the alcohol percentage in the beer is high enough to kill any yeast. If the beer is above 10% ...


2

If you didn't stir your priming sugar very well, it's reasonable to assume that it didn't mix into the beer completely. In your case, the larger bottles didn't get the level of sugar that you intended. You have to take the oxygenation risk if you're manually adding priming sugar. If you don't want to do that, then I suggest using carbonation drops.


2

A week might not be long enough (especially if your yeast is particularly beleaguered, which would depend mostly on what the ABV of the finished beer is and how long it's been since fermentation). Also, make sure your bottles are in a warm enough area (~70 deg. F is ideal for bottle-conditioning). Lower than this and it can definitely take several weeks, ...


2

Based on my experience, you'll have more than enough yeast to carb. I've lagered beer for 2-3 months and still had plenty. If you really feel that you need to add yeast, any neutral yeast will be fine. I tend to use US05 becasue it's inexpensive, easy and reliable. You use so little that it has no effect on flavor, so you don't need a lager yeast.


2

The yeast that carbonates your beer should already be in suspension, that is, invisible without a microscope. So, unless you've filtered the beer, don't worry about the yeast. Don't stir up the yeast cake either, those might not be very happy/tasty. But, you should stir the sugar into the beer to get good carbonation, as discussed here and in many other ...


2

If only some of the bottles were overcarbonated, in my experience that means the priming sugar wasn't mixed into the beer thoroughly enough in the bottling bucket. Two ways to ameliorate that are: if you have enough length, coil the tubing coming from your racking cane on the bottom of the bucket, creating a gentle whirlpool sanitize a spoon and gently ...


2

The release of CO2 can take certain volatile aroma compounds with it. Sometimes this is a good thing (it can strip sulfur notes out of beers) but can also take hop aroma compounds, less than ideal if it's dry-hopped or heavy on late-addition hops. In this case you might notice a slight loss of hop aroma. Any foaming caused by degassing will also affect the ...


2

Priming sugar will give you a very controllable, repeatable result with minimal to no impact on flavour, aroma or mouthfeel. Inconsistency when using this method is entirely down to process (i.e. inefficient mixing). Using Gyle (held wort) is a perfectly acceptable method as well, that will adhere to the German purity law (should that be important to you or ...


2

It's not impossible but your equipment won't work well for this process. First point- if you want more control over the carbonation, you'll need a pressure gauge to see how carbonated the cider is (before you bottle). Otherwise the old ferment-add sugar-bottle routine will give better control over the carbonation. Second point- that fermenter you're using ...


2

You can certainly add it to carbonated beer. I prepare my gelatin in water heated slowly to 150F. Stirring it until its totally dissolved, then letting it sit at room temperature for 5 minutes to be sure the dissolved gelatin has completely hydrated. Open the keg top and pour it in. Reseal, purge with CO2 quickly and shake it around some to be sure its ...


2

Cider can take a while to ferment. Without a lot of the natural yeast nutrients from malt, cider can be a "slow" ferment as the yeast are at a disadvantage. At the same time, cider is mostly completely-fermentable sugars, so the yeast will get there, in time. Your best way to understand fermentation is gravity readings, accomplished by using a hydrometer: a ...


2

This is the technical answer: In order to find out when your cider is ready to drink or to bottle and how strong it is in alcohol, you really need a hydrometer. This is a floating glass gauge that tells you how much sugar is dissolved in the juice. You should check the OG(Original Gravity = concentration of sugar in the original apple juice) after ...


2

There is a common factoid that oranges are usually sprayed with fungicides for transport. If you do not wash them enough, some of it may end up in your mead and kill your yeast. My friend, who happens to be catering technician, always washes them for good few minutes using brush, if she wants to use zest for anything. Even longer before we put it in my beer. ...


2

"At 10 °C and 5.6 atm, a cooled champagne bottle (V = 0.75 L) would contain ca. 9.5 g of dissolved carbon dioxide (Table 2) [3]. Once the bottle is opened the CO2 pressure falls to at most 1 atm. Solubility considerations dictate that at 10 °C no more than 1.7 g will remain dissolved, so roughly 8 g of CO2 must suddenly be set free. This quantity of CO2 ...


1

Put in an unfermentable sugar prior to carbonating, like lactose. Or sweeten it, carbonate in the the bottle and then pasteurize in a dishwasher to kill the yeast before it consumes all the sugars. Obviously you'd need to do this in glass bottles and it the right temperature. Personally, the single time I've made bottle carbonated cider I was perfectly ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible