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You're on the right track, but DME is around 80% fermentable, so you wouldn't get much residual sweetness. Using a blend of lactose and sucrose (table sugar) might work. The sucrose will ferment producing a small amount of alcohol and carbon dioxide. The lactose will not ferment and will provide residual sweetness. You could also try an artificial ...


2

This is called "back sweetening", and you can look it up for a more authoritative answer than mine. As far as I know there are three approaches (purely from reading books and recipes, I've never actually back-sweetened myself): Add sugar right before you drink it. Add non-fermentable sugars or sweeteners. I've seen lactose most commonly recommended. ...


2

Five gallons worth of priming sugar going into four gallons of beer is most likely your problem. The possibility of inadequately stirring it into the beer before bottling (surprisingly not all that uncommon for beginners) may exasperate the problem to the point of bottle bombs. If over-carbonation is a common problem for several of your bottles, you may ...


1

To answer your question, yes, you did the right thing. The residual yeast in solution that were eating the priming sugar and producing CO2 will go dormant when it gets cold. Putting the beer in the fridge simply stopped any more natural carbonating so you can drink them at any point now. Did you thoroughly mix the priming sugar into the wort or did you ...



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