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16

Well you carbonate the beer in the keg the same way as if you were going to serve from the keg. There is no carbonation procedure on the way into the bottle. To get carbonated beer into the bottles however, the cheapest way to do it is to jam some 3/8ths inch tubing onto the end of your picnic tap. Using about an 12 inch piece of tubing you can put the ...


14

No. If you are that dire for things to happen quickly fill one plastic bottle each time you bottle. It will be firm once the beer is carbed. You can simply re-use 16-20oz soda bottles for this, or buy plastic beer bottles with screw on caps.


13

Temperature can often be the reason. I had a Christmas beer that didn't carbonate because my basement was too cold. I simply took the bottles to a warmer place and they carbonated in the normal time. Here are some reasons a beer won't carbonate: Temperature: If the beer is too cold it can put the yeast into hibernation. Warming up the bottle might be all ...


13

It takes at least 3 days to be carbed with the sit and wait method you describe. But a week is really what you need to truly "equilibrate" to the pressure being set. In your case of shooting for >3 volumes I would definitely expect it to take a week. The beauty of kegging though is that there is no reason to not pull a half pour after day one, two, six ...


12

There is nothing wrong with using carbonation drops. There are some advantages. They give you a very consistent carbonation from bottle to bottle. Uneven priming sugar mix in the bottling bucket (forgetting to stir it without adding oxygen) can lead to uneven carbonation. Bottle bombs and weak/no carbonation. You never forget to add them, which ...


12

There are two parts - carbonation, and getting it in the bottles. For carbonation, there are various methods, but I use the set-it-and-forget-it method. Beer goes in keg, keg goes in fridge, CO2 gas gets put on keg. Just set the pressure to the amount of CO2 you want in solution - "volumes" of CO2 - based on the style of beer and a handy temperature / ...


12

Firstly, be sure fermentation has completely finished before bottling. 1.029 is a high FG - from a SG of 1.090, that's about 8% abv. I would rouse the yeast, maybe even add additional yeast. You can use potassium sorbate to halt the fermentation, but at a relatively low 8% abv, you will need a lot of it, more than the 0.18g/l taste threshold. Better to let ...


11

You will have bottle bombs. Luckily for you it's not too late, but you're in for some careful work. Sanitize a fermenter and airlock. Fill a bucket or tub with sanitizer. Put the bottles in the bucket to sanitize the outside. Sanitize your bottle opener. Uncap them and carefully pour their contents into the fermenter. Do not splash. Sanitize your bottle ...


11

I can't think of a reason the drops would be more consistent than sugar, assuming you prime the whole batch and not each bottle. Personally, I've found the drops less reliable. And sugar is much less expensive. I still have drops I've never used because I was so dissatisfied with the results when I tried them.


11

If you are sure your primed the bottles then they should most definitely carbonate. It could be a temperature issue creating sluggish yeast. What temperature are your bottles at? Get them to 70F or better and they'll start carbonating. Put one on top of your water heater for a few days and see what happens. EDIT: You know another great place to warm ...


10

With a beer that strong, you probably should have repitched at bottling. There are several factors that the yeast must fight in this situation, including: high alcohol strength - almost 10% ABV cool temperature - the bottom two degrees of the yeast's fermentation range long settling time - six weeks There's good news, though. That strain should be able ...


10

I think the biggest problem with one person drinking from a growler of beer (even if you want to drink the three pints yourself) is the pour and repour. Your surface area issues and estimations in releation to a normal 12 or 22oz bottle are good. However, if you poured three 4oz samples from a 12 oz bottle you'd be stirring up the yeast just as often. To ...


9

After sanitizing everything, you could connect the CO2 line from the tank to the keg, only connect to the downspout side rather than the normal gas inlet side. With the lid removed, slowly fill the keg with CO2 - it will fill from the bottom, pushing the air out. You can use a lighter to test to see when it's full of CO2. (Lower a long fireplace lighter ...


9

For a 12-oz bottle, I fill it all the way to the top with the bottling wand. The amount of liquid displaced when I pull out the wand is about 2 inches from the top. For larger 22-oz bottles, I fill it a little less, but still keep approximately 2 inches of head space from the top. I've never had a problem with the lids blowing off or low carbonation. ...


9

TAKE THE STOPPER OUT! THIS IS A SERIOUS ACCIDENT WAITING TO HAPPEN! Unlike glass bottles, glass carboys are not designed to hold pressure. 4 tsp in 1 gallon will produce about about 2.4 volumes of CO2. The pressure created will be significant - at a minimum 22 PSI, but likely more than that, since fermentation proceeds quicker than the CO2 will dissolve, ...


8

How long and what is the diameter of the tubing from the keg to the tap? If the tube's resistance is not what it should be, it could be causing the foam issues. There's a good explanation and formula here.


8

There is only one real answer, absent any off smells or flavors and that's too many fermentables. Infections can cause gushers too, but there would be other signs. You are either adding too much priming sugar (corn sugar, DME, what have you) or you are not letting your beers reach terminal gravity, which is the point when they go dormant due to lack of ...


8

If you're bottling into different-sized bottles, then priming the whole batch with sugar is going to give you more consistentcy from bottle to bottle. If you use 1 drop in your 12-ounce bottles, either choice of using 1 or 2 drops in your 16's will make them differently-carb'd from your 12's. You could come closer with "prime tabs", which had a greater ...


8

Not in my experience. I did a test where I used corn sugar, cane sugar, brown sugar, honey and DME (maybe even something else) and also force carbonated a split batch. After 2 months of conditioning, none of the tasters in a blind test could distinguish one from the other, and no one exhibited a preference for any one method.


8

This does sound like dangerous advice, unless they also tell you at which specific gravity to start bottling. If you bottle to early, you could get bottle bombs, and too late you get flat beer. If you bottle at a SG close to the expected final gravity then you can reduce the chances of the above from happening. If you were going to use priming, sugar, for ...


8

Yes, this is to be expected and perfectly normal - when you have a half filled container of beer, the carbon dioxide that's dissolved in the beer will come out of the beer to fill the space available, so you have less carbon dioxide in the beer, and less fizz. You can try keeping the half-filled bottles cool which will retain more carbon dioxide in the ...


7

Well, do make sure the beer is cold before doing your pressurize and shake. The colder the liquid, the more CO2 it can absorb. Otherwise, you can't go much faster than you mention as far as I know.


7

Muntons makes a product called "Carb Tabs". I am pretty sure they are what you are talking about. For your sake, DO NOT use them. From my experience, they do not dissolve all of the way and you are stuck with 2-3 little white chunks in your beer. This particular brew still had chunks in it 8 months after bottling. When this happened I did some research ...


7

This is one of the reasons I'm glad I keg my beer now. I had this happen a bunch of times when I used to bottle. From what I've always heard, it is most likely due to either a.) Too much priming sugar, or b.) Too many fermentable sugars left--in other words, fermentation wasn't complete. Another cause could be bacterial infection, but my sanitation was ...


7

I'd give it another week or two before opening any more. Sometimes you need 3 - 6 weeks to get full carbonation. That said, you may not have used enough priming sugar. Using this priming sugar calculator can help in future batches: http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html (There could be other problems, but this is the most likely one. Other ...


7

There certainly isn't any harm on doing it at bottling. You just don't want to do it prior to bottling. Adding straight water to the beer might oxidize the beer. I'd just recommend that you boil the water for a good 15 minutes first to drive off any oxygen that's in the water. If you don't then that O2 will mix and oxidize the beer. I'd boil for 15, ...


7

Well I get commercially filled growlers at the liquor store with metal lids on them and they stay carbed until opened. I think it just depends on how well the cap is sealed when it gets closed. I proper lid will keep it carbed until opened. Even in between openings it should hold its pressure, albeit at a lower lever because you'll lose some everytime you ...


7

You can get away with juggling the CO2 between the kegs. But it quickly becomes a pain. (I did it for a short time before building a keezer.) If the carb/dispense pressure is going to be the same for most of your kegs, then you just need a way to split the CO2 from your regulator to multiple lines. You can use a Wye, or better, a manifold. If you see ...


7

If you happen to have access to a CO2 tank and just not the keg, you can use something like The Carbonator. It will go on the top of a 2 liter soda bottle and you can hook the CO2 up to that. My roommate has done this with great success, and I actually carbed a bit of my first batch of beer using this method because I was impatient. Another option would be ...


7

CO2 is less readily absorbed by warm liquids. Therefore, CO2 in solution comes out of solution when you warm the beer. Whenever it works for you. The warmer the beer is stored though, the sooner you should try to cool it back down. Warmer storage promotes faster aging. For me, the point where I want to start cooling it down again starts at about 80F. ...



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