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7

Most of the time capping on foam is a technique used when filling bottles off of kegs. There is always some foaming that happens during the fill off the keg. Obviously it can't be done if you are using flat beer with priming sugar. But if you are using some sort of filling method with carbed-up beer that results in not foam you can induce the foam with a ...


7

Give it a try-- fill a bottle with water, put a cap on, flip it upside down, and see if any water drips out. If the cap makes a watertight seal, then the next time you're bottling fill a couple and see how they work out.


6

No need to worry! The priming sugar will up the alcohol content by a marginal amount but you probably won't notice. It is definitely a good idea to let the yeast take care of the extra priming sugar, although this shouldn't take too long, I'd say wait a couple days and then re-prime and bottle. Priming sugar is a pretty simple sugar so it should ferment ...


6

My capper does this too. It's not been an issue for our beer. If it was leaking I'd think you might see some evidence around the top.


6

I've done it a few times by accident, and it worked fine each time, but the risk of an air leak is too great to do it on purpose, in my opinion...


6

I have used swing tops in the past without issue. If you are worried about the seal you can buy replacement seals, which should probably be done every once in a while. I don't think it's necessary every time. I have bottled 2 batches using some Fischer bottles and had zero problems with the seal. As far as the green bottles go. If you keep it out of the ...


6

The 2 handle capper is what i've been using for years. It works just fine, I haven't had any problems with it. It's very cheap and less annoying than the hammer on capper. I will eventually move to the bench capper, but my brew equipment is taking up enough space as it is. I would definitely recommend the jump to the 2 handle capper.


5

Not reliably. The threads for the twist cap don't allow for a pop cap to securely fasten and will let the beer go flat very quickly.


5

Absolutely you can. I've been doing it for years.


4

I am also in the process of collecting belgian beer bottles for the purpose of bottling. This has the nice side effect of having to consume some awesome beer to obtain the bottles (I know I can buy them but this way is more fun). Northern Brewer sells the corks and hoods: Corks, Wire Hoods Luckily I already have this corker from my wine making adventure:...


4

Glass carboys are not rated for pressure, I would definitely not recommend trying it there. If fermenting or finishing in a metal vessel (like a corny keg), you can use a spunding valve to control the amount of pressure in the keg to force carbonation, similar to actively adding CO₂ to the keg to force carbonate after fermentation. It's a practice born out ...


3

It hard to diagnose this without pictures, numbers, etc... Maybe you overprimed, maybe you didn't. Over priming with good caps = beer volcanos. And explosions. And a big mess. So maybe there is something wrong with your caps, bottles, or capper. Leaky caps should have held some gas, giving you random levels of carbonation. The only time I ever had a miss-...


3

Maybe you've already seen the US-based Bottlemark, out of Houston, Texas. If you can't find a low-volume cap customizer in the UK, I would say that Bottlemark is your next-best bet. Shipping on 100 caps is estimated to be just USD$10 internationally.


3

Generally speaking, twist-off bottles are also made of thinner glass and are more susceptible to breakage. There's a higher risk of breaking the neck off when capping and also of the bottle cracking or breaking under the pressure of carbonation. I'd avoid using twist-off bottles.


3

If you can twist it around, its not tight enough. To carbonate, the seal on the cap must be completely airtight in order that the CO2 that is produced from residual yeast consuming the priming sugar you added before bottling will pressurize the headspace and then saturate the beer. Without the seal, the pressure in the bottle won't increase and the CO2 will ...


3

Are the bottles that you are using screw tops? That might be the problem. Although some people have had success, others complained about leaks How are you capping? Maybe you are causing damage by using too much force. Test: place a balloon or condom over a bottle. If the item inflates, you have a leak. if it does not, open the bottle (after 2 weeks to ...


2

I've bottled some of my beer in swing top bottles. I like them pretty well but they are difficult to scavenge (rare) and expensive to purchase. So if cost is your motivator buying a capper (check craigslist) and caps, and fishing bottles out of a local pub's dumpster (ask permission and wear gloves!) will probably be cheaper. I had one seal fail on me, so ...


2

I use old Grolsch bottles all the time, with no problems. I keep them in a box (out of the light) when priming, then they go into the fridge when ready, or the basement. I get many re-uses out of the rubber gaskets, but do inspect them for cracks/tears that may prevent a proper seal.


2

Here's the best method I've found after trying a few different approaches: Cool the bottle to 38-40 degrees (this prevents the beer from foaming much) Prepare your replacement caps and have them at the ready, as well as your capper Handle the bottle gently Place the bottle on a counter or other sturdy surface and very gently pry off the cap. Minimize any ...


2

If a cap is defective and you notice it soon enough then you can just remove and replace. If its been awhile then your priming sugar is probably spent and that bottle is a loss IMO. Its not worth the effort of trying to add more sugar again. If you added too much priming sugar, it sort of depends on how much extra. Some people have luck with prying off ...


2

I personally prefer the bench capper. It's a little more expensive, but I think it works better / faster / easier. I broke my first one recently, after using it for over 5 years.


2

When using the two handled "red baron" capper, i prefer to use the weight of the capper to seat the cap without pushing down. When the handles are lowered, i try to use a slight lifting motion with the portion of my hands facing center. I've only ever busted one bottle, and it was my first. On that bottle i was pushing down with quite a bit of force and ...


2

I have a habit of breaking the handles off the two handed cappers. ;-) Quality construction there for sure. I have not had the pleasure of breaking bottles, yet. But what I switched to was the upright capper: http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/super-agata-bench-capper.html Works like a charm. I tend to push down and spin the bottle an then push again ...


2

We had this exact issue with our second capper, except our failure rate was approaching 10%. We had been using twist off caps (that was what was available to us at the time) we switched to a stand capper and the failures were eliminated. We have also switched to non-twist bottles and when we cap with a hand capper (we don't do this often now), but we haven'...


1

It sounds like you're not getting a good seal on the caps. Do you notice carb loss over time? Do they leak when you simply tip them upside down? If so, it could be any number of things: the capper, your technique or the bottle itself (e.g. twist off rather than pry-off).


1

Were you using plastic pet bottles? If you use soda bottles some of them have a blue plastic seal under the cap which acts like a washer when you screw the cap down. If the cap is old the plastic seal may not be effective. Another option is that some plastic bottles do not use the blue plastic seal so you have to be careful as the what bottles go with ...


1

You can loosen the capper bell a few turns, that way it will press lower and give a tight seal on those bottles that have a shallow flange. I do this all the time on those annoying, but beautiful bottles.


1

I don't think there's a single easy solution to your issue with hand cappers, you may need to keep the two types around to cover as many as possible. The Bench Capper would work fine for you, just sort the bottles by height and that way when it comes to capping you won't need to change the height as frequently. There's not really a clear cap interface ...


1

In my experience you need to just get some champagne corks and wire ties. This is harder to do without the aid of a corker but the caps won't keep the air out as well as any baddies that will get in to your bottles.



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