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6

I'm HIGHLY suspicious of substituing aspirin for metasulfate (the active compound in Campden tablets). Different chemicals and I've never heard of aspirin being effective against yeasts at normal concentrations. Certainly not a single tablet or two (or more). Aspirin is not an effective antimicrobial in the concentrations that you would want to drink. It ...


6

Campden doesn't kill cultured yeast, at least not at the levels you'd want to use it at without significantly hindering the flavor and aroma of your beer. The problem with using Campden (Potassium Metabisulfite) is that it adds significant levels of free and bound SO2 to your beer. This will cause your beer to smell and taste like sulfur. Wine is ...


4

The general recommendation from award winning meadmakers is to use neither heat nor campden.


3

I have used potassium metabisulfite, the main component in campden tablets, a couple of times to stop fermentation in my cider. Although I now use Potassium Sorbate instead to reduce the amount of sulfites. Campden tablets do not kill yeast but actually makes the environment inhospitable for the yeast. It does this by releasing sulfur dioxide into the ...


2

Honey is aseptic. The water content is too low for microorganisms to develop, so there is no need to pasteurize or use campden. Campden is used in winemaking to eliminate the wild yeasts which exist on grape skins, this helps ensure a more consistent product by eliminating the variation introduced by wild yeasts. None of this is necessary with mead and in ...


2

Yes, you can make mead without campden tablets. I only use them for stabilizing the mead at the end. 1 campden tablet per gallon to ensure fermentation does not kick back up. I have never added them to the beginning. Some people will pasteurize/boil their meads, claiming that pasteurization will kill all impurities. That is an old school mentality, as ...


2

Primarily its a subject of dietary preference to avoid additional sodium in the diet. However, its a moot point because generally a very small amount of sodium would be being added. Also potassium has a somewhat higher flavor threshold than sodium. Meaning sodium begins to taste saltier sooner than potassium. (at least this is the case on my palate) ...


2

If you are using 1/4 campden tablet per 5 gallons, you should be fine. If you are using 1 tablet per gallon, then you need to wait 24 hours. I typically use 1 tablet for ~10 gallons prior to mashing and do not wait at all. http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter4-1.html


2

AFAIK, the tabs are standardized. One tab has enough sulfite to treat 20 gal. of water, so 1/2 tab is enough for your needs. If the tabs are are 550 mg., I'd base the powder measurements on that. It would be easy to add a dose of powder and either smell or taste the water to see how effective it was. BTW, water guru Martin Brungard has recently written ...


2

WY1084 can be a slow starter. On at least 3 occasions has 1084 left me with no visible signs of fermentation for 72 hours, and then it springs into life. Give it 72 hours and then decide what to do. I'd be very surprised if the yeast really are dead. More than likely you'll see signs of fermentation. You can use either campden tablets (1 per gallon is ...


2

I vote for #1. First of all, the reason to smack a pack is to assess the viability, not to grow more yeast. Maybe you were already aware of that. Did it swell at all? Your OG was higher than I like to direct pitch, but not so high as to give you real problems. Your wort should still be OK given good cleaning and sanitiation procedures, but you could ...


1

My initial guess was the Campden tablet's SO2 was the culprit and hunting around for similar stories I found this on a home brew forum: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=267418 Observations in this thread would seem to fit with what you have experienced.


1

According to jackkeller.net, the action of pectic enzymes is reduced by high levels of sulphur dioxide. The gases dissipate after the addition of the campden tablets, which is the reason for recommending to wait 12 hours before adding the enzymes. (Whether the enzymes are actually denatured by the sulphur dioxide is somewhat unclear.)


1

Are you adding it to the must to sterilise it, or are you simply adding it to the water to remove chlorine before adding the water to the other ingredients? If the former, yes, you should leave it 24 hours before adding the yeast. By that time the sulphur dioxide will have evaporated and should be of no detriment to the yeast. I usually add the Campden when ...


1

Used as you are using it, it will all be gone by the time you add yeast so there's no problem. Not only are there hours between when you add the campden and the yeast, you'll be boiling the water before adding yeast. I have used it to inhibit bacteria when I make cider, but 24 hours after adding I stir the juice and the campden off gasses and there's not ...


1

Heh, go back and read the link. It has been updated to indicate this is a myth... "It is a common misconception that campden tablet can be used to halt the ferment process..." same here too



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