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8

You want a blue flame, and one that is not pushed away from the burner. Propane can burn when the ratio of propane to air is in the range 2.2-9.6%. Within this range lies the ideal ratio where fuel to air are properly balanced and the fuel burns with a blue flame and the flame temperature is at it's hottest - 3600F/1990C. The blue flame is characteristic of ...


6

http://www.blichmannengineering.com/brew_stand/brewstand_modular.html If you follow that link, and click on burner data, you can get the manufacturer's description of what makes theirs better. From their description, and what I can see, you're looking at: Faster boil time Possibly better designed stand (don't know the other model) From their numbers, ...


6

I recommend listening to John Blichmann's appearance on Brew Strong where they talk about burners and boil. Obviously the man is proud of his product, so he talks it up. But his knowledge and enthusiasm for home brewing is what really sold me on his equipment. I settled on buying a Blichmann burner because I hate buying equipment twice. I'd rather spend a ...


5

I'd say get the brew kettle. You can use it on your stove (I hardly ever use the propane burner). You can't do partial boils going all grain, so you'd have to do little batches, which is annoying since all-grain takes a bit longer. Also, it's just after thanksgiving, I bet you could find a good deal on a turkey fryer, they come with both the brew kettle ...


4

Whoof... I would not recommend doing a full boil inside an apartment if you can possibly avoid it. You're basically putting a gallon or two worth of water into the air. Things will get muggy quite quickly. Presuming you can't get a natural gas hookup, you'll be restricted to butane burners; propane gives off too much carbon monoxide. Even with a butane ...


3

It is my understanding that an almost entirely blue flame with a small amount of yellow at the tips is the most effective (separate from most efficient but I believe what you are looking for) for rapid heating.


3

As mentioned, BTUs are your primary issues. "Turkey Fryers" are very popular and kick out enough power. Side concerns would be storage. Gas bottles, burners and pots take up a LOT of space. Keep that in mind then purchasing the items. Gas bottles should not be stored indoors. Please follow COMMON SENSE and your local rules and regulations regarding the use ...


3

I've been contemplating this myself recently. I've looked into induction hotplates, but I've found that they're too expensive for my blood. Here's what's on my list right now: Just grab a turkey fryer from Walmart that comes with a 7 gallon kettle ($60). Sure it's aluminum, but that makes it significantly cheaper. I've been using aluminum so far with no ...


3

If you think about what the turkey fryer is meant to do, heat up a few gallons of oil to around 300° F, then you should reach the conclusion that it will be fine for boiling water. In a nutshell: 30,000 to 50,000 BTUs will heat up your five gallons with ease. A.J. deLange over at the Homebrew Digest #5092 Temperature shifts in water are very easily ...


2

I would say that you would get immediate use out of the burner and would probably invest in that first. You will need an 8+ gallon pot for all grain and this may be too big to use effectively on your stove but would be a good investment after the burner. The cooler would be the last piece of the puzzle. Although you should keep your eye open for close ...


2

I bought a turkey burner and then bought a Blichmann after realizing how flimsy the turkey fryer was. When I got the Blichmann, the comparison was obvious. Here's a picture of both the cheap turkey fryer and the Blichmann side by side: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jwynia/5333294931/ The Blichmann is considerably more sturdy than any of the turkey fryers ...


1

Based on having done it myself, you will possibly have a burned, smoky flavor and not in a good way. Whether it's safe to drink depends at least partially on what the bag is made of. If the bag was muslin, it's likely safe. If it was nylon, I'd be more worried.


1

I would check Blichmann Engineering as not only a reference for burners, but other items like pumps and valve sizing on their big kettles (you will need a 55 gallon kettle to boil 35 gallons and get, say 33 in the fermenter and keg 1 barrel). That dual burner unit at Home Depot is probably not sufficient to hold the full boil kettle (your kettle would cover ...


1

It usually tastes like ashy burnt sugar. But if you racked the beer out of the kettle and there wasn't a big black spot in the bottom of the kettle then you have no worries.


1

It's entirely subjective. When I upgraded from my 5G pot to a 10G and started doing full-volume boils, I replaced my turkey fryer with an "outdoor cooker" burner. I can get 6.5G of water to a boil about as fast as I could 3.5G with my old pot/burner, and my new burner has a wind screen so I don't have to relight if the wind kicks up. I'm sure my new ...


1

Its probably worth it if you wanted to eventually upgrade to the blichmann brewing stand, to keep it all modular. If you don't plan to doing a whole stand eventually, the burners from HomeDepot type sources work just fine. And BTUs for any burner you see is dictated more from the regulator on the tank and not the burners configuration itself. Its also ...


1

I think you should check out this post here on Improving your brewing significantly. FWIW, IMO: Full size Brew Pot Burner Temp Contol Yeast starters Cooler


1

If you buy the cooler (mash tun) first, you can start smaller-batches of all grain now. If you buy the full-size kettle now, you can use it right away in your existing batches even if you don't do a full boil. If you get your burner now, well, you can use it right away, I suppose. You can also probably find both the kettle and burner for a cheaper price. ...


1

The #1 issue with propane cookers is that the BTU ratings aren't always accurate. I talked with a heating engineer once about this. Apparently, there are no solid industry standards when rating propane cookers. A BTU is a BTU true, but the way you measure it can take different forms. So when looking at burners you can't really compare between ...



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