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38

The term "secondary fermentation" is misleading since the purpose isn't to continue fermentation. A secondary stage can be used for any combination of things: Clarification: racking to secondary gets the beer off the yeast cake and allows more particulates to fall out of suspension. This is often the only reason I use a secondary stage; I like clear beer. ...


7

An extended soak of your brew bucket with warm cleanser and/or bleach or baking soda will help clear up your bucket post this ferment. Its not something to worry about IMO. My old buckets have definite stains from years of use but I've never had carry over flavor issues. Its usually too dilute compared to the flavors of the next ferment.


6

Buckets are cheaper, lighter, and easier to deal with in general. They're not advisable for long term storage though, as they allow some light and oxidation to occur. Carboy's allow no oxidation, but they're more difficult to deal with. If you get a carboy cleaner wand, this is an attachment to a garden hose or water tap that creates a powerful stream of ...


6

If the bucket is a mess you should be cautious about using it to ferment in - the main downside to buckets is that easy access to the internal surfaces makes it easy to scratch. Scratches are potentially difficult to clean, and so are a possible source of contamination. Here is a an article on identifying food grade buckets. tl;dr - look for the recycling ...


5

It's the type of plastic, and how it's manufactured (it has to do with the chemical properties of the plastic). A food grade container will not allow most foods to leach toxic chemicals from it under normal operating conditions. Using Plastic Buckets in Food Storage


5

I agree with Jeff L, that secondary is useful for particular things. To your question, I only ever do a 'secondary' when adding fruit or extended aging. My beers clear just fine after two weeks in the fermenting vessel. I've never experienced off flavors from that two weeks on the yeast, and I always dry hop in the primary. For me I can't find any reason ...


5

I was told that it helps the clarity of the beer, since the sludge from the primary will be left over in the first fermenter. I use a glass carboy for secondary fermentation. I also know of many people who bottle right after primary, as you do. If it's working for you, then it's no big deal. Try doing a secondary for a batch and see if you notice a ...


4

The biggest downside to the carboy I've found is in checking the specific gravity to tell if the initial fermentation is done. The hydrometer simply falls too far to read well. We had to attach some dental floss to it so we could retrieve the thing! This was especially true during our last brew which had a VERY active fermentation with lots of stuff ...


4

You should be fine using a 5 gallon bucket, especially during primary fermentation. The CO2 produced should push out all the excess oxygen. In secondary, you might have a problem, but probably not unless you're leaving the beer in secondary for months. Why only a 3 gallon recipe though? Go for broke with 5! :)


4

Choosing between buckets, glass carboys, etc is always a matter of personal choice. The ease of use on buckets is high, but the durability is poor and they are much harder to keep sanitary over multiple uses. Any tiny scratch will make the bucket hold microbes you can't see or kill with a simple acid rinse, and now your fermentation vessel is a ticking time ...


3

Unfortunately there's not going to be a single right answer since the amount of sediment depends a lot on how much yeast there is, which is a factor of the batch size, O.G., yeast health, etc. Also there may be more or less hot and cold break depending on the rest of your brew process. If possible I would try to brew a typical batch and then see how bit ...


2

As an extract brewer planning to start going all-grain sometime soon, I can't answer from experience. But my plan is to start by buying a cooler to use as a mash tun. You can use a bucket, but without any insulation you'll have a hard time maintaining the 150-158F required for a good mash. I plan to build mine from one of those big job site drink coolers ...


2

Any food grade bucket will do, but keep in mind that the plastic will asborb flavors. So don't use a pickle bucket (etc.) unless you want pickle-beer.


2

I used WY 3724 in my last saison. My records show 60 days to go from 1.053 to 1.005, but I kept the temperature at 88 F. for most of that. For the first few days, the yeast is very active. However, the krausen falls, and the yeast slows down once 50% apparent attenuation is reached. If you raise the temperature and are patient, the yeast will keep going and ...


2

In my opinion, buckets are close to the cheapest part of brewing and you should not take chances. a reputable home brew supply house will sell them for around $15 with a lid and spigot. i would hate to see you spend a day brewing, a day of bottling activity, 2-3 weeks fermenting and a couple weeks in the bottles and find out that you have 2 cases of gross ...


2

The down side to glass carboys is that they break and cut you. I've heard of some pretty heinous injuries caused by dropped carboys. Plastic buckets have never hurt anyone. OK. Maybe I am a bit paranoid about it. But I'm always drinking beer while making beer. I suspect I'm not the only one. The idea of drunks carrying around large, heavy, glass ...


1

What yeast are you using? I've had 2-3 month primaries with saisons in the past, nothing to worry about. From http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=60 This strain is notorious for a rapid and vigorous start to fermentation, only to stick around 1.035 S.G. Fermentation will finish, given time and warm temperatures.


1

In my dealings with Saison yeast they take a bloody long time to finish primary fermentation, 105 days doesn't sound untoward to me. You'll find that it'll be slowly bubbling for the whole time. It's definitely a patience yeast, and you'll probably want to make enough so you can check the gravity every 3-4 weeks to ensure it's still going (and to give you ...


1

If you read this page: http://www.bayteccontainers.com/gama-seal-lid-white.html It has the following information: "Fits 3½,5 & 6 Gallon Buckets" and "THE GAMMA SEAL LID FITS STANDARD 12" DIAMETER PLASTIC PAILS." and "AIRTIGHT Reseals Your Bucket or Pail Easy Opening Lid Fits All Universally Used 12" Opening Pails and Buckets" So I would say if your ...


1

Found this comment in a newsgroup about the B3 buckets I have 1 and the lid does not seal. I have since bought a gamma seal lid that spins off. it is very air tight. It seems they do fit. It's simplicity itself that the mouths of buckets are all the same size. I don't think that's how it is here in Europe.


1

Your cheapest option is probably to just get a 5 gallon paint bucket lid opener from a hardware store. Something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Linzer-5425-Plastic-5-Gallon-Opener/dp/B000KKPBFE


1

Agreed - I do 3 gallon batches in 5 or 6 gallon carboys all the time. As PJ notes, the only trick is going into secondary, since you have so much more room for oxygen in there. If you can't put a blanket of CO2 into your fermenter to help keep the oxygen away from your wort, then at least make sure you're careful on transfer. Don't splash it too much, ...


1

Buckets are much easier to deal with: they're lighter, easier to get material in and out of, easier to clean, and generally unbreakable. I have a couple of carboys and a bunch of buckets. I almost never use the carboys because they're just so much more work. Be careful when cleaning a glass carboy with a hose pushed into the neck of the bottle. If there ...


1

Buckets are definitely easier to clean, since you can actually get in there and rinse and scrub, but if the plastic gets scratched, you might never be able to fully sanitize it again, as bacteria can get down into the scratches and avoid the sanitizer. My personal preference is to use a carboy for the main fermentation work, as I can actually see into it ...



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