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The caps are not perfectly smooth - they contain nucleation points, imperfections or dirt along the surface, where a bubble could form (similar to how boils are formed at nucleation points when heating water). As the cold water heats up, dissolved gasses are forced out of solution. Some of this gas dissipates, but some of it will attach to the nucleation ...


3

FWIW, its highly possible that the oily surface you observed is not at all related to your head and carbonation problems. I've seen that oily 'shimmer' on the top of several beers in primary, and like you, I was worried that some soap or something had gotten in there. However, I never noticed a correlation between the oily/rainbow sheen and any head ...


2

I have not experienced this before, but I would try to err on the safe side and siphon off everything above it, and try to leave the bubble undisturbed. If it is gas, it will probably pop since the pressure around it decreases, but if it is liquid you might be able to leave it in peace. I guess that it is liquid though which could have formed because the ...


2

The picture shows that your beer is actively fermenting. The brown foam is called "Krausen" and is composed of yeast and other solids that have been pushed to the top of the fermenter by the force of escaping CO2 The most likely explanation for the lack of airlock activity is that either the bucket's lid was not properly sealed, or the airlock was not ...


2

An airlock does not provide a good indication of fermentation activity. You can have significant bubbling without fermentation or significant fermentation without bubbling. The only thing reliable way to measure fermentation is to take two gravity readings separated by a few days. If your final gravity is steady and near where you expected it to be, you can ...


2

As others have stated, airlock activity doesn't mean much. For what its worth I bottled a cream ale while secondary was still bubbling albeit at a rather slow clip. It had sat a week longer than recommended so I figured I was safe, turns out I was right. Brew tastes fantastic. buy a hydrometer and learn to use it, honestly its your best bet to ensure ...


1

I wouldn't rely completely on airlock activity. You should take a gravity reading with your hydrometer or refractometer at the same time each day for 2-3 days. If the gravity doesn't change, then fermentation should be complete and you can go ahead and bottle. Airlock activity isn't a reliable way to determine if your beer is done fermenting or not. The ...



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