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6

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


1

Since this question keeps getting bumped, I thought I'd have a go at it. Here are a few relevant points from the literature. Malt has slightly less fat than unmalted barley: "Up to 4% of the dry weight of barley is lipid and 3.4% in the case of malt." (corn and oats may both reach 6+%) "30% of the lipid content of barley grains disappear[s] during ...


4

The short answer is Yes, I think you're fine. I'm assuming that by "brewer's sugar" you mean Corn Sugar, which is the most common type of sugar used in brewing, usually used as priming sugar (for carbonation). After reading your post a few times, I'm thinking what she gave you actually IS corn sugar. See this excerpt from this article: "Corn sugar/syrup: ...


0

Using an Immersion Whirlpool Chiller, so a pump to recirculate the wort, and accelerate the thermal exchange. Consider a tap water between 24C to 28C (75 to 83F), and an environment temperature of about 26C to 30C (80 to 86F). To chill about 20L (5 galons), I use only the tap water until I reach about 45C (113F) collecting all the hot water that exists from ...


1

Priming with wort (aka priming with gyle) is a bit tricky to accurately calculate. As Pepi mentions, you aren't working with fully fermentable sugars, so using a direct sugar calculation will be off. When I primed with gyle, I used a calculation based on Papazian's guidelines in the Joy of Homebrewing. I made the assumption that his calculations were to ...



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