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16

AFAIK, there are no benefits. They're all basically the same. Brewing sugar is corn sugar and while there may be chemical differences between it and other types of sugar, the end result in your beer will be indistinguishable. Sugars like piloncillo or demarara can add a bit of flavor, but the result of adding corn, cane, beet, or brown sugar are pretty ...


14

I found How to Brew to be a very helpful book along with The Complete Joy of Homebrewing. I feel like it complimented Papazian's book well, and in some cases was a bit easier to read, or filled in any lingering questions I had. In the end everyone seems to go with Papazian's, but I think How to Brew was an easier read.


12

A lot of commercial breweries do that. Most that I know pitch a normal, or slightly larger, amount of yeast for the first batch. By the time the second is added, there has been enough yeast growth to accommodate it.


9

Top tier - Sparge Water Middle tier - Mash Tun Bottom Tier - Boil Kettle The main benefit to having the vessels stacked in this manner is that you can transfer water/wort without the use of a siphon or an electric pump, everything can be gravity fed from top to bottom. Three tiers also allow you to easily fly sparge much easier than other setups ...


8

In general, higher-alcohol beers age better. Something like a barleywine in the 10+% ABV range would likely be a good choice. As for aging 21 years, that I couldn't speak to. I've aged Imperial Stouts up to 2 years, and they keep getting better. Dogfish Head claims their DFH 120 will age well up to 10 years, and I think that's better than 15% ABV. Edit ...


7

The Complete Joy of Home Brewing by Charlie Papazian


7

You should be capturing hot water out of your chiller for cleaning so that water is dual purpose. Second I was really able to cut down on water usage with a more efficient chilling operation. For me I invested in a bigger immersion chiller (50ft with 1/2in tubing) and put a pump into operation. I recirc my wort while chilling creating a whirpool. This is ...


7

It looks like you can boil the avocado, and skim the oil off of the top of the water, I'm not sure of the pectin content in avocado, as this could give your beer a permanent haze, so I would recommend mixing some pectic enzyme in with your "avocado extract" when adding it to your secondary to help get rid of the pectin. I found this article which seems to ...


7

I don't see any way you could know for certain. IMO, the best way to add flavoring to beer is by taste. Wait until the beer is fermented and pour 4 2 oz. samples. Dose each with a different, measured amount of espresso and taste to determine which you like best. Then scale that amount up to your 23L batch size. I do this with every flavoring I try and ...


6

One of the best beers I've made came from a sandwich. Seriously. I was eating a pepper turkey and pepper jack on Jewish Rye, with some spicy mustard. Toward the end of the meal, I bit into a caraway seed. The flavor exploded! I decided I needed that in a beer. So I came up with a recipe for a rye dry stout with caraway seeds. It's my best recipe.


6

Are you talking about not adding any hops at the beginning of the boil and relying on only late addition hops for bitterness? This is a technique I have read about and tasted a few examples and the results were pretty good. This works well in moderately bitter beers where you want a lot of hop flavor and aroma. Basically you eliminate the 60 minute ...


6

First of all, don't be so hard on yourself. Think of all the efficiencies made by brewing and drinking your own stuff. The beer in the store was driven there in a big, fossil fuel burning truck, with a whole lot of water used in the process. Home brewed beer comes in either re-used glass bottles, or re-purposed soda kegs, never in cans that end up in a ...


6

While I respect your intentions, it is highly unlikely (basically impossible) that any beer you make today will be good after 10+ years of aging. Ask yourself this question. If you personally are "into beer" enough to be a home brewer, why is it that you yourself have never had a 10+ year old non-distilled, barley-based beverage? The closest thing I've had ...


6

If you produce the same volume of beer with more malt, this will increase both alcohol and residual sweetness. It's the residual sweetness that will give it a heavier body. A couple other things you could try that won't affect the alcohol content as much: Mash at a higher temperature. Keeping the mash temperature close to 156 F. will lead the creation of ...


5

Without doubt, How To Brew, by John Palmer has been the biggest help to me in starting brewing. It is easy to start off with and then intriduces more complexity. A book I constantly go back to.


5

Kent Place Software produces some useful brewing apps for iPhone and Mac. They also have an iPad version in the works. I've used their Beer Alchemy Mac software for awhile. BeerAlchemy Touch is their iPhone version. It's a bit pricey at $14.99, but provides wireless syncing between the mac version and the iPhone version, which is really handy. Brew Math ...


5

I just bottled 5 gallons of cider I made (my first batch last year was excellent, and strong). I've definitely found cider to be easier than beer when it comes to the actual brewing. That said, if you press the cider yourself and/or add in apple picking for 5 gallons worth of cider, you've got a bit of work to do. The recipe I used was specified by the ...


5

Cleaning: If you use PBW, one batch of PBW can be reused many many times. This may also be true of other cleaners, but I've only ever used PBW. Sanitizing: As with PBW, one batch of StarSan can be reused many times. The key with StarSan is to make the batch with the cleanest water possible and then keep it in a sealed container. Cooling: There are lots of ...


5

Let me try to answer your questions. 1) Modern home brewers use airlocks to minimize the chance that airborne wild yeast or bacteria will populate the beer and produce undesirable characteristics. A brewer chooses a specific yeast strain for their beer because of the particular properties that that yeast strain has been cultured to impart on the beer. The ...


5

A similar question was asked here on the BN forum. It all boils down (no pun intended) to whether the wheat malt will have enough diastatic power to convert itself. The answer to that is a little confusing to me so far. The charts at the Home Brewing Wiki here give diastatic power as percentages, but other references I've found use Lintner or ...


5

I agree with Tobias on more unfermentable sugars (high mash temp) and dextrine malts (carapils). I'm adding a separate answer because I've had good luck adding maltodextrin. Carapils, which is supposed to do the same thing, has given me somewhat inconsistent results - that is sometimes I notice it and sometimes I don't. People tend to use maltodextrin more ...


5

The best way to get started is to find out if you have a friend, co-worker, or other acquaintance who brews and is willing to brew a batch or two with you. This is ideal as you don't need to buy anything to get started -- your friend will have it all. Of course, bringing a six-pack or buying the batch's ingredients is always a good gesture :). If you find ...


4

No matter when you add hops, you'll get some bitterness. That amount will decrease the later in the boil you add them. As Chris noted, you can add larger amounts of hops later in the boil (usually at 20 min. or less) to get bittering levels equivalent to the traditional 60 min. bittering addition, but the character of the bitterness will be different.


4

Started doing hard ciders (apple, pear, hot pepper, peach, cactus pear, raspberry, pumpkin spice, about 60 gal total to date) last august and have learned a few key things. Using a juicer is just as good as using a traditional cider press. When you use the pressed stuff, you end up having the clarify the hard cider, while juiced apple cider is more clear. ...


4

You can certainly make great cider that way, but it's hit or miss. I've made probably about 6-8 batches using natural fermentation and my record is about 50/50 great cider/vinegar. A more reliable method is simply to pitch some yeast into it. Almost any yeast will give good results, but I've made my best ciders with WY4766 cider yeast.


4

It's possible, but cilantro's flavor relies on several very volatile flavor compounds. If you end up with the wrong ones, you might end up with a soapy beer. See Harold McGee's article from yesterday's New York Times about the various flavor compounds and how they affect taste. I would be very careful about this. As a cook, I'm generally very careful with ...


4

The Brewmasters Bible. I bought this book when I started out about 5 years ago. It was easy to follow then, having never brewed before, and I feel there is still a lot I can learn from the book now. I don't have any other books to compare this too, but it served as an excellent starting point for me and I still find it to be a good reference.


4

One style not already mentioned would be to brew a sour. They typically age well. For example, if you check out the back of a bottle of Boon's Mariage Parfait the best before date is typically 20+ years.


4

Assuming you keep the beer under CO2 and purged the oxygen from the keg, it will keep quite a while. Several months at the very least, and it could be years. However, if you serve it "real ale" style without CO2 you are limited to a few days in peak condition.


4

You are correct in assuming that Partial Mash and All Grain are BIAB-compatible brewing methods. I would say that if you are planning on doing Partial Mash, a bag would be recommended since you usually don't want to lauter the brew (maybe you do in some cases, but not any I have come into contact with). This means that having some specialty grains and ...



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