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6

I'll have to do some checking, but from what I understand, the biggest difference is time, the next being a vast difference in sourness. If you ferment first with a non-souring yeast the majority of the fermentable sugars will be converted quite quickly. Brett is very slow to ferment and also to multiply. If it has to ferment all of the sugars alone it ...


6

Disclaimer: I don't bug my beer, so this is not coming from experience but reasoned conjecture and corroboration by sources. As far as sanitation goes, Brett is as easy to kill as regular brewers yeast. Jess Caudill, microbiologist and brewer at Wyeast, wrote "[Brett] is as easy to kill as any Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of yeast. No crazy chemical ...


5

I've done intentional Brett brewing, and also have a friend who has a very persistent strain of Brett somewhere in her brewhouse that is popping up in all her beers. When young, Brett can taste kind of fruity (but not like normal ale yeast fruitiness) and starts to develop of flavor that kind of reminds me of vomit, but its not as bad as it sounds. Just kind ...


4

That's a lot of questions. Here we go: I have taken regular apple cider, added spices, and fermented it. It works fine. If spicing yourself, the advantage of adding spices after fermentation is that you can periodically taste and add more as needed, or rack off of the spices when you reach the desired level. Since you're using pre-spiced cider, the ...


4

I think relying on the supposed wild bugs in the wood naturally is generally a bad way to go. You've already done it "right" by pitching an appropriate brewing Brett strain you got from wyeast. So go ahead and steam your oak cubes first. You want to give the bugs you put in there on purpose the best chance at being the predominant character in the final ...


3

I think your best bet would be to ferment with your primary yeast as planned. Transfer to secondary. Pitching in the brett to finish of what residual and non fermentables it can. This might take a few months. Then I'd bottle as usual, maybe even adding a 1/4 packet of dried ale yeast to ensure you get carbonations. That way if it is possible to get a ...


3

Brett won't change the amount of priming sugar you need. Just be sure fermentation is complete before bottling. The problems people have had with Brett is if it is added later after another yeast, it can consume sugars the other yeast won't consume, leading to overcarbonation. Also, it usually ferments slower than saccaromyces, so you may want to wait ...


2

According to White Labs' site, they say WLP650 was intended for secondary fermentation, but it would appear that if you use a yeast starter, you may be alright. Q: I am planning a sour brown ale with bret bruxellensis as the only yeast. Is there anything special I should do with this strain and is this a good idea? A. We don't recommend the vials ...


2

Although you could use bleach as a effective "yes-rinse" sanitizer, the chances are the bugs are in your environment, not just the equipment, so you'd have to do this before each brew, which is a bit of a pain. Last year I had some slight contamination issues, which I later tracked down to my forgetting the correct dosage of Star San. (That's what happens ...


1

You'll have to thoroughly examine your sanitation process. Of course we all think that we're doing it perfectly, but most of us are not. Think about any equipment that might not get sanitized (for example, your ball valve coming out of the kettle -- do you sanitize it before running the wort out of it? Look for things like this) My hunch is that it's ...


1

Clean, sanitize, keep it simple. Infections will happen because of other things in your environment. You could try wiping down all surfaces around which you will be working for a while. That may help. Also you could try replacing equipment which is inexpensive and more likely to be trouble, like stoppers and airlocks. However, usually your key issue is ...


1

Use the thick bottles to bottle with when using brett. I would suggest not using priming sugar for the brett. I do not know your FG for the beer, but the brett will eat the residual maltose and produce c02. Adding priming sugar will either make the beer over carbonated or make the greater possibility of a bottle bomb. I just pulled a bretted dubbel that ...


1

I've not noticed any effect in any of the Brett beers I've done - if I'm doing Brett stuff though I will always bottle into half champagne bottles or Orval bottles, assume that they'll be bombs and wrap the whole lot in bin bags just in case. I've not had any bottle bombs though but I think it pays to be safe.


1

I wouldn't throw wort on top of your old brett/pedio/lacto cake, the ratio of bugs will be different from your original pitch. You'll have an abundance of the pedio/lacto and probably not too much brett or saccaromyces left alive. One option of reusing your bugs would be to ferment a batch of beer with a new pitch of saccaromyces and then add some of the ...


1

Yes, I think you can just dump it right in, with no starter. Warning: I suggest that you double your normal sanitizing procedures with everything that comes in contact with the Brett. A couple of years ago I added the dregs from a couple of bottles of Orval to a batch, and the Brett showed up in quite a few of my subsequent batches. I dumped out probably ...



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