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5

The main reason for soaking the oak in Bourbon is to sanitize the oak. The Bourbon will kill any bacteria on the oak chips so you have less risk of batch contamination. Then later add more Bourbon to taste.


5

Jordan, Whichever way you want to flavor a beer is fantastic! That’s part of the fun with brewing. Unless you are concerned about following the Reinheitsgebot, don’t worry about adjunct materials. I really like the way you decided to flavor your beer. If you’re looking for further suggestions, try finding wood chips soaking them in your favorite bourbon, ...


3

I have a recipe for Bourbon Vanilla Imperial Porter that's very popular. I add the bourbon post fermentation, pre bottling or kegging. I pour 4 2 oz. samples of the beer and add a different measured amount of bourbon to each. After tasting them all and picking the one I like best, I scale that amount of bourbon up to the batch size. I find this makes an ...


3

I don't know if there's an answer to your question because it's totally subjective and based on personal taste. For instance, I have a rather "famous" Bourbon Vanilla Imperial Porter recipe. I use Jim Beam in it and it turns out great. Other people also like the beam in the recipe. But you've said you don't like it, even though I could recommend it based ...


2

I would say don't add it to secondary at all. Add it a little at a time at bottling, mixing and adding to taste. Track the amount you use and if you make the beer in the future, you can just add that entire amount again. That said, I have had good luck pitching a 12oz-16oz of bourbon into 5 gallons and getting decent flavor. Depends really on the flavor ...


2

There is no right or wrong answer for this. You start small and add to taste. Of course your taste will differ from anyone else but there is no formula or standard amount. Just remember to document the amounts you add, so the next time you will have a reference.


2

Like I have said before, its the taste that matters in the end to me. Not some sort of right or wring way to get there. I make a winter ale with oak ships soaked in burbon. To which I add my cinnamon and nutmeg as well. Let it sit for a few days then put it all in secondary. You method sounds great to me.


1

I've wondered the same thing, but I doubt you'll find the answer that you seek on this forum. Here's my best shot at a solid, scientifically-founded answer to your question: To understand the effects of aging a bourbon beer, you need to know two things: the key flavor and aroma compounds in whiskey, and the effects of age on these specific compounds. The ...


1

All flavors will fade from beer as it ages, whether bourbon or hops. The solution is either to drink the beer sooner, or flavor it more heavily to account for the eventual fading,


1

I don't think there's any wrong way to add bourbon flavor to your beer other than adding something that hasn't been sanitized properly ;) Jack Daniels sells wood chips made from their old barrels for smoking on the grill but I don't see any reason why you couldn't use them to add some oak and bourbon* flavor to your brew, just be sure to sanitize them ...



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