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More likely than not, your issue is with Phenolic and not Vanilla Extract (although, I would just use beans for brewing). Brad Smith has an excellent write up on that: http://beersmith.com/blog/2012/06/19/phenolics-and-tannins-in-home-brewed-beer/ TL;DR This can be caused by Chloromines in your water (toss a campden tablet in your strike water), wild ...


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Adding the priming sugar to the primary and rousing it gently should be ok as long as the yeast is finished and has clumped together. It should settle back out within a few hours. I know when my local pub did a brewing course this was how the guy running it did his. Of course in order to get maximum clarity moving it over to a secondary would be better but ...


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It would be advisable not to try to mix the sugar multiple times in the 2 gallon bottling bucket because you will end up with slightly different results for the three times you bottled out of that bucket. I think you would be best off putting the brew in the 5 gallon carboy with the priming sugar, and then siphon into the bottling bucket, that way you can ...


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As others have said already youtube has a mass of informative videos but filtering them can be tricky. Herb Tarlek is right Northern Brewer is a good place to start and this video in particular is a good starter: Northern brewer Starter 101: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jaDQ6S6p6Wk For more general brewing information and tutorials: Beer Geek Nation: ...


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"Or do I rack to a larger 5 g bucket/carboy with no spigot, and mix in the priming sugar at at once. Then just siphon out into the bottles." Given the equipment that you have and your objectives, this is the best option.


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Add the campden tablets and once they have dissolved you are good to go with your bottling. For further reading: http://www.eckraus.com/blog/add-campden-tablets-to-wine


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Have you already mixed in the sugar? If so, you'll want to bottle it now before fermentation begins. I've also observed clumps of yeast rising from the bottom of the fermenter when racking, but I have no explanation of why this happens. I think you're fine to bottle it as is. The beer will clarify in the bottle, if left long enough, and the yeast will form ...


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Herb Tarlek is right... there are tons of youTube channels and Northern Brewer's stuff is good. As to the matter of overcarbing some bottles and undercarbing others in the same batch: here's how to solve that... take 2 cups of water and add your priming sugar to it. Bring it to a boil and hold it there until the sugar is fully dissolved. Pour that into ...


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have you checked out YouTube? There are thousands of them.. some good.. some not so good.


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What the calculators are trying to estimate is how much CO2 from fermentation is still dissolved in the beer. The yeast produce CO2 during fermentation, most of which escapes into the atmosphere, but some remains in solution in the beer. The amount that remains is influenced by temperature and pressure. Assuming the pressure is nominally atmospheric, we only ...


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Apparently these calculators are telling you how much sugar is currently in the beer, assuming the yeast have been working at the current temperature (and that the beer remains saturated with CO2). If cold beer is put in a room temperature bottle, it will warm and lose some CO2 in a few seconds. So I'd say calculate based on temperature when the cap is put ...


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The thing about champagne yeast (and other wine yeasts) is that they have been selected to eat a lot a of fermentable sugar with little nutrients around. Another facet of this is, even though the yeast is recommended for a particular temperature doesn't mean it won't ferment outside that range, or wake up later to finish the job. As long as there is live ...


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It's possible that the yeast isn't going to sleep fast enough. You could try putting the bottles into the freezer for a short time before refrigerating in order to reduce the temperature rapidly.



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