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Five gallons worth of priming sugar going into four gallons of beer is most likely your problem. The possibility of inadequately stirring it into the beer before bottling (surprisingly not all that uncommon for beginners) may exasperate the problem to the point of bottle bombs. If over-carbonation is a common problem for several of your bottles, you may ...


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To answer your question, yes, you did the right thing. The residual yeast in solution that were eating the priming sugar and producing CO2 will go dormant when it gets cold. Putting the beer in the fridge simply stopped any more natural carbonating so you can drink them at any point now. Did you thoroughly mix the priming sugar into the wort or did you ...


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To better understand what to use, you have to understand what the yeast actually likes to eat. Yeast can only consume simple (monosaccharides) sugars. Of this, glucose/dextrose is preferred but it will also consume fructose and galactose. In order for it to consume more complex sugars (disaccharides and polysaccharides), such as sucrose (table sugar) or ...


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Sulphites are used in a lot of wines, ciders etc and as a general food preservative. So long as you aren't adding more than the directions call for you should be ok, especially if the packing doesn't give you warning. I use it for my wife's wine and cider at 1/4 teaspoon per 5 gallons. If you still want to rinse ensure you use sanitized water or you could ...


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Most of the priming sugar available at homebrew shops is finely granulated dextrose/corn sugar. It can be confused with; but it is not confectioners sugar. Most confectioners sugar contains anti-caking agents in it, like cornstarch or silicates. Neither of these are necessarily good for your beer. I stopped buying "priming sugar" from the shop and ...


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It is almost certainly not confectioner's sugar, but instead dried malt extract (DME), which has a very similar super-fine powder consistency. While DME is all malt sugar, confectioner's sugar is a mix of finely-ground table sugar and corn-starch. You do not want corn-starch in your beer. Alternatives for priming sugar are pretty much any pure fermentable: ...



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