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0

You probably want to make sure that you put equal amount of sugar in each bottle... I guess, the best way is to use a syringe.


1

Before I switched to kegs, the easiest and most reliable method I found was to siphon off some of the beer (typically a litre or so), warm it in a saucepan, and dissolve the appropriate amount of priming sugar. I used dextrose or some other invert sugar since it seems more likely to ferment out thoroughly, and less likely to impart off flavors. Of course I ...


8

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


1

Rack your beer out of the fermenter into a sanitised bottling bucket, which could just be another fermenter, where the beer is evenly mixed with all your priming sugar before being bottled straight from there. Normally the under / over carbonation issue is caused by differing amounts of priming sugar added to each bottle when priming the bottle ...


2

The yeast that carbonates your beer should already be in suspension, that is, invisible without a microscope. So, unless you've filtered the beer, don't worry about the yeast. Don't stir up the yeast cake either, those might not be very happy/tasty. But, you should stir the sugar into the beer to get good carbonation, as discussed here and in many other ...


-1

There is a chart that provides this info. I use sugar cubes for consistency. ...


3

According to this page, which was linked to recently on Basic Brewing Radio's facebook page, you can make no-rinse sanitizer with: bleach diluted to 80 ppm an equivalent amount of white vinegar to adjust the pH (mixed in after the bleach has been mixed into the water -- do not mix full-strength bleach and vinegar directly) This info is apparently backed ...


1

This is when your fermentation is working and the "krausen" is your yeast cake on the top of the fermenting wort. This should make you very happy, your yeast is working and it is producing alcohol/beer! See also, information on counting yeast cells to see how active your yeast is under a microscope. There are also studies on under/over pitched yeast ...


0

Foam is not normal near bottling time, it usually means that fermentation is still happening - that is, it is not bottling time. A few bubbles can be formed just from loss of CO2 (from a rise in temperature for example), but the best way to be sure is measure the specific gravity. See this thread. Especially note, as the above thread points out, it's good ...


5

Let's separate this out into two phases: carbonation and dispensing. Carbonation inside a keg can be done just like carbonation inside a bottle: by the addition of a specific amount of sugar, which will be fermented by the residual yeast, which will create a specific amount of CO₂, measured in "volumes". With external CO₂, however, you can also "force ...


3

The beer inside a keg should (and virtually always will) be fully fermented and carbonated if you're dispensing it. This is how beer in a commercial keg comes. In the situation I think you're referring to, CO2 or a pump is simply used to add/maintain enough pressure within the keg to push the beer out and into a glass. CO2, when applied at the right ...



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