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My simple rule of thumb for brewing: primary: 2 weeks bottle: 3 weeks plus at room temp, standing upright. Haven't had any issues yet.


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If you don't leave any head space you are in danger of the bottle exploding (bottle bomb) because the priming sugar and the yeast will continue to create CO2 to carbonate your beer and without enough head room the bottles will explode because the pressure will need to go somewhere! Cheers!


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My capper does this too. It's not been an issue for our beer. If it was leaking I'd think you might see some evidence around the top.


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Yes, you should reduce the amount linearly. 5oz * (4.25gl/5gl) = 4.25oz. EDIT: on second thought, 2.5 volumes isn't all that high. Though: 5oz of sugar will result in a pretty high carbonation for 5gl of beer. What sort of style? At what temp will you be doing your bottle priming? I suggest using a priming sugar calculator to get a better handle on how ...


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Yes, one of the best and most common methods is to rack your beer to a secondary fermentation vessel, and an additional transfer before bottling.: Make sure primary fermentation is complete first. This is typically several days to a week. You can use a hydrometer to take successive readings to be certain. If the gravity of the beer doesn't change over a ...


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I agree with DAX, have put bottled beer directly into the fridge. It takes about 3-4 weeks, but will carbonate. The carbonation may be finer (smaller bubbles) but is adequate. Don't think it really adds much just did it many years ago as an experiment, comparing to room temp carbonation from same batch


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The only way you're going to prevent sediment from forming at the bottom of your bottles is if you force carbonate (most commonly done through kegging) and fill your bottles after it's been carbonated using something like a counter-pressure filler or a Blichmann Beer Gun. Your best bet is to follow the instructions you were given. The steps will likely ...


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Gas compresses under pressure. Liquid doesn't. If you have no head space, then when CO2 is produced after bottling, there's nowhere for the pressure to go but to break the bottle. If you have too much head space, then if enough CO2 is produced to produce the bottle, then there's quite a bit of compressed gas expanding, and that expansion is dangerous, ...


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Carbonating with yeast and priming sugar, carbonating with a CO2 tank and aging a beer (under any number of conditions) are all different animals. You can carbonate in a keg with yeast and priming sugar (treating it as a large "bottle"), but like the other posters said, it's not going to work well at fridge temps. Aging a beer has different effects depending ...


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What I've been told is that the CO2 from that space is what dissolves into the beer to carbonate it. I can tell you from my experience that little to no headspace makes the beer carb less and slower and lots of headspace makes it carb more.


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You can do that, but you will lose a bit of the CO2 that has been produced. Assuming you cap, you will have to recap with new (sanitized) caps. If you work clean this should not give you any problems.


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Conditioning (getting CO2 into the beers) will stop or slow down to a crawl in a fridge. Lagering (storing beer at fridge temps) will cause the beer to be clearer as more yeast will fall out. Oxidation will be minimized. Higher alcohols will be avoided.


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Carbonation from conditioning is cuaused by yeast. Generally, refrigerating beer reduces the temperature below the yeasts active temperature and halts conditioning. Beer taste changing from aging is cuaused by yeast and other factors. Not all beers improve with age. All beers have there prime. It may be fresh out of the fermenter, such with lower alcohol ...


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Don't put anything on the grommet on your fermented. The fermentation chamber has a positive pressure of CO2 anyway, so you won't get nasties in there. I would, however, fill the airlock with StarSan (or even cheap vodka) instead of water. For the post brew cleaning, just use OxyClean (or the genericequivalent). Add some water to your kettle, dump a ...



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