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3

No, in fact the rewards almost certainly don't outweigh the risk of oxygen pickup (or contamination) from the rack. This is especially the case if you're not going to be performing a true secondary fermentation (i.e. bottle- or keg-conditioning). Even if you are, best to rack straight into the bottle or keg so that any ill effects of oxygen pickup will be ...


4

If bottle-conditioning is completely finished, there's no reason it won't be ready to drink as soon as it's cold, if you're only considering carbonation. The amount of CO2 in solution is indeed determined by temperature and pressure, but since we're talking about a closed system, the total amount of CO2 inside the bottle can't change once it's there, it can ...


1

The CO2 dissolution in the beer is a function of temperature, gravity and head space pressure in bottle. It is not a linear function, it resembles a exponential function. @Pepi is right about having a feeling that the longer it stays on the fridge, more carbonated it will be, the CO2 dissolution keeps going on, but after some time the increase is ...


1

I'm not aware of how the temperature will effect the carbonation and CO2. I have been more interested in the flavor impact of the serving temperature. So the best answer for that would depend on two factors 1) What temperature you're storing them at now, and 2) what temperature do you want to serve at? I tend to store my beer around "cellar" temperature in ...


0

I like to leave the bottles in the fridge for a minimum of 48 hours if I can. This is based on my experiences with gushers; I seem to get a lot fewer if I let the beer "settle" in the chill chest. There might be some confirmation bias involved in this, but it certainly does seem to help.


2

I would not say that there is an 'optimal time' but several factors can affect your cellaring decisions. Hoppy beers will stay hoppy longer when cold. Other spices probably do too - I've noticed that orange peel also goes away quickly. Chill haze will go away with a long time spent in the fridge. As far as CO2 goes, all that gas is already dissolved, but ...


0

You probably want to make sure that you put equal amount of sugar in each bottle... I guess, the best way is to use a syringe.


1

Before I switched to kegs, the easiest and most reliable method I found was to siphon off some of the beer (typically a litre or so), warm it in a saucepan, and dissolve the appropriate amount of priming sugar. I used dextrose or some other invert sugar since it seems more likely to ferment out thoroughly, and less likely to impart off flavors. Of course I ...


8

weigh your priming sugar, don't measure the volume boil it in just enough water to dissolve it for a few minutes pour that sugar syrup into your bottling bucket rack the beer onto the sugar mixture give it a couple gentle stirs with a sanitized spoon That works for me. Hopefully it will work for you, too!


1

Rack your beer out of the fermenter into a sanitised bottling bucket, which could just be another fermenter, where the beer is evenly mixed with all your priming sugar before being bottled straight from there. Normally the under / over carbonation issue is caused by differing amounts of priming sugar added to each bottle when priming the bottle ...


2

The yeast that carbonates your beer should already be in suspension, that is, invisible without a microscope. So, unless you've filtered the beer, don't worry about the yeast. Don't stir up the yeast cake either, those might not be very happy/tasty. But, you should stir the sugar into the beer to get good carbonation, as discussed here and in many other ...


-1

There is a chart that provides this info. I use sugar cubes for consistency. ...


3

According to this page, which was linked to recently on Basic Brewing Radio's facebook page, you can make no-rinse sanitizer with: bleach diluted to 80 ppm an equivalent amount of white vinegar to adjust the pH (mixed in after the bleach has been mixed into the water -- do not mix full-strength bleach and vinegar directly) This info is apparently backed ...



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