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24

OxyClean. The stuff works wonders. Fill a bucket with a scoop of OxyClean and hot water and let the bottles soak for about an hour. Most labels will simply slide right off; some will even float right off the bottles to the surface. The ones that don't will be easy to remove with a rag or sponge. You also generally never want to use dish soap or detergent on ...


16

Well you carbonate the beer in the keg the same way as if you were going to serve from the keg. There is no carbonation procedure on the way into the bottle. To get carbonated beer into the bottles however, the cheapest way to do it is to jam some 3/8ths inch tubing onto the end of your picnic tap. Using about an 12 inch piece of tubing you can put the ...


15

This often happens for 1 of 2 reasons: bottling too soon, as @LoganGoesPlaces suggests. This means the yeast has not finished consuming the sugar in the beer and continues to do so in the bottle which releases more CO2 than the bottle can handle. You can tell if the fermentation is complete by measuring the Original Gravity and the Final Gravity and ...


15

DO NOT put them in the fridge after three days. You'll want to store the newly bottled beer at around 70 degrees for a few weeks. Since you are bottle conditioning, the yeast will need time to carbonate the beer. If you put the beer in the fridge now, the yeast will drop out before it finishes eating the priming sugar, and you'll have flat beer. With ...


13

Because of the grooves for the cap to actually twist off, there's nowhere near enough for the lids to clamp onto. The regular lids and capping tools are all geared toward the nice, thick lip of glass on "regular" bottles. While you might "sort of" get a seal on a twist-off, it's a ticking time bomb before it leaks and your beer spoils/oxygenates, or just ...


13

You should only aerate before the yeast have had a chance to really get going, so that they can consume all of the oxygen that's in suspension. It's really too late now, and will likely result in oxidized flavors. The yeast should be fine for carbonating your beer with simply the priming sugar, though.


13

The caps are not perfectly smooth - they contain nucleation points, imperfections or dirt along the surface, where a bubble could form (similar to how boils are formed at nucleation points when heating water). As the cold water heats up, dissolved gasses are forced out of solution. Some of this gas dissipates, but some of it will attach to the nucleation ...


12

There are two parts - carbonation, and getting it in the bottles. For carbonation, there are various methods, but I use the set-it-and-forget-it method. Beer goes in keg, keg goes in fridge, CO2 gas gets put on keg. Just set the pressure to the amount of CO2 you want in solution - "volumes" of CO2 - based on the style of beer and a handy temperature / ...


11

I found this online a while ago and have done it this way ever since: Filling from a Keg: 1.Keg of beer must be chilled and carbonated. I like to over carbonate by a few tenths (0.2) of a volume of CO2 to compensate for lost CO2. (some of that lost CO2 is a good thing as I’ll state later) 2.I use a black Cobra/Picnic tap to dispense the beer from. I ...


11

You will have bottle bombs. Luckily for you it's not too late, but you're in for some careful work. Sanitize a fermenter and airlock. Fill a bucket or tub with sanitizer. Put the bottles in the bucket to sanitize the outside. Sanitize your bottle opener. Uncap them and carefully pour their contents into the fermenter. Do not splash. Sanitize your bottle ...


11

There is nothing wrong with using carbonation drops. There are some advantages. They give you a very consistent carbonation from bottle to bottle. Uneven priming sugar mix in the bottling bucket (forgetting to stir it without adding oxygen) can lead to uneven carbonation. Bottle bombs and weak/no carbonation. You never forget to add them, which ...


11

It depends on the beer and the storage conditions. To start, the stronger and hoppier the beer, the longer it will keep. For instance, a hefeweizen won't keep as long as a barleywine. The temperature is also important. Generally, cooler is better. The main thing is to avoid excessively high (85+) temps. Avoiding temp swings helps, but it's mainly high ...


10

If you're using normal caps, you can boil or sanitize. I wouldn't follow the advice of boiling them with the priming solution though, if only because the caps would get sugary and sticky. If you're uncertain about whether to boil or sanitize, why not handle them the same way that you handled your bottles. After all, the beer is going to be in greater ...


10

I can't think of a reason the drops would be more consistent than sugar, assuming you prime the whole batch and not each bottle. Personally, I've found the drops less reliable. And sugar is much less expensive. I still have drops I've never used because I was so dissatisfied with the results when I tried them.


9

For removing your own labels that you apply to your bottles, use a label with a hot-soak water soluable adhesive. When you're ready to reuse your bottles, a soak in hot soapy water is all that's needed to slide the labels off. Removing labels from store-bought beverage bottles can be hit or miss because each bottler can use different label materials and ...


9

For a 12-oz bottle, I fill it all the way to the top with the bottling wand. The amount of liquid displaced when I pull out the wand is about 2 inches from the top. For larger 22-oz bottles, I fill it a little less, but still keep approximately 2 inches of head space from the top. I've never had a problem with the lids blowing off or low carbonation. ...


9

Is your IPA in the bottles any good? Is the carbonation OK? If so, then do not do this, or you risk ruining the beer. Moving the beer from bottles to a keg introduces a great deal of oxygen into the beer, which will dramatically shorten the shelf life of the brew and possibly introduce off flavors pretty quickly. Having said that, I actually did this ...


9

For cleaning, I rinse bottles with hot water immediately after pouring them out into my glass. They don't need any sort of washing with soap at that point. I keep them off to the side until I have a whole bunch ready for de-labeling, which is an overnight soak in a sink full of PBW. Most labels just slide right off the next day. A quick rinse and the bottles ...


8

There is only one real answer, absent any off smells or flavors and that's too many fermentables. Infections can cause gushers too, but there would be other signs. You are either adding too much priming sugar (corn sugar, DME, what have you) or you are not letting your beers reach terminal gravity, which is the point when they go dormant due to lack of ...


7

I have almost exclusively used twist off bottles. I have never had any issues with any of them. They are generally well carbonated (I blame myself for any issues there), and I haven't noticed any major off flavours from my bottles. The capper that I use was one that came in a kit from a local brewshop and I don't think it's anything special. My ...


7

Yes; I'd say they do. Even when capping on foam, you're still going to end up with some O2 in the bottles. This usually isn't enough to turn a beer bad, but depending on how long you're planning to age the beer it can make a difference. I'd always use oxygen-absorbing caps on higher gravity beers like barleywines and imperial stouts that I plan to keep in ...


7

I use green Grolsch bottles all the time, without problems. The bottles don't see light until I crack them open. Fill, close, box to carbonate, and then to the firdge. I leave the cages and ceramic tops on the bottles when soaking in sanitizer, but I boil the gaskets separately, I don't trust a sanitizing solution. As to the flavor of Grolsch, I guess ...


7

This is one of the reasons I'm glad I keg my beer now. I had this happen a bunch of times when I used to bottle. From what I've always heard, it is most likely due to either a.) Too much priming sugar, or b.) Too many fermentable sugars left--in other words, fermentation wasn't complete. Another cause could be bacterial infection, but my sanitation was ...


7

I'd give it another week or two before opening any more. Sometimes you need 3 - 6 weeks to get full carbonation. That said, you may not have used enough priming sugar. Using this priming sugar calculator can help in future batches: http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html (There could be other problems, but this is the most likely one. Other ...


7

If you're bottling into different-sized bottles, then priming the whole batch with sugar is going to give you more consistentcy from bottle to bottle. If you use 1 drop in your 12-ounce bottles, either choice of using 1 or 2 drops in your 16's will make them differently-carb'd from your 12's. You could come closer with "prime tabs", which had a greater ...


7

There certainly isn't any harm on doing it at bottling. You just don't want to do it prior to bottling. Adding straight water to the beer might oxidize the beer. I'd just recommend that you boil the water for a good 15 minutes first to drive off any oxygen that's in the water. If you don't then that O2 will mix and oxidize the beer. I'd boil for 15, ...


7

Somewhat. Lack of carbonation can really alter the flavor, but you should be able to pick out major characteristics or flaws in the beer. But I wouldn't advise reaching any real conclusions until the beer is carbed and has an appropriate conditioning time. That time will vary from beer to beer.


7

Add it at bottling or kegging. The flavoring does not need to sit for a prolonged period if you do not add too much so adding it to the secondary would be redundant. The time in the bottles to carbonate should be plenty of time to get what you are looking for. A tip for the amount to add: Take a 1/2 pint and drop some of the flavoring in and taste, add a ...


7

Since you have the red baron capper, the crown size is actually interchangeable. Noted in the below picture, these metal brackets on each side slide out, revealing a different size crown on it's opposite side. You can then flip the bracket and slide it back in. This is where I would start, especially since you state the caps are the exact same size. I have ...


7

Mason jars are designed to retain a vacuum seal, not keep outward pressure in. Chances are it may hold the pressure up to a certain point before the actual seal on the lid fails, but the glass itself is not tempered glass, and therefor is not designed to withstand the pressures of bottle conditioning. Bottle conditioning inside of mason jars may easily ...



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