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29

If you don't have enough reputation to edit this list, leave your addition as a comment, and someone will add it. Easy to re-use USA West (AK, HI, CA, OR, WA, ID, NV, AZ) Anchor Brewing- They look good and the labels come off easily. Alaskan Brewing Company Come of easily with water but do require a much longer than expected soak (possibly over ...


25

OxyClean. The stuff works wonders. Fill a bucket with a scoop of OxyClean and hot water and let the bottles soak for about an hour. Most labels will simply slide right off; some will even float right off the bottles to the surface. The ones that don't will be easy to remove with a rag or sponge. You also generally never want to use dish soap or detergent on ...


20

I started off just marking bottle caps with a sharpie. This worked well for my own purposes, but whenever I give it to someone they had no idea what it was. Last Christmas I gave beer as gifts, so I made a special label. I bought beer bottle label paper and was able to design any shape and print it out. Cutting out the labels was a pain, applying the ...


15

This often happens for 1 of 2 reasons: bottling too soon, as @LoganGoesPlaces suggests. This means the yeast has not finished consuming the sugar in the beer and continues to do so in the bottle which releases more CO2 than the bottle can handle. You can tell if the fermentation is complete by measuring the Original Gravity and the Final Gravity and ...


13

Because of the grooves for the cap to actually twist off, there's nowhere near enough for the lids to clamp onto. The regular lids and capping tools are all geared toward the nice, thick lip of glass on "regular" bottles. While you might "sort of" get a seal on a twist-off, it's a ticking time bomb before it leaks and your beer spoils/oxygenates, or just ...


11

I like to use custom bottle caps. They are really cheap and you can design whatever you want and have it printed on them. They also make for good stocking stuffers for any home brewing friend/family members.


11

I don't label the bottle itself, because I hate removing the labels later. Instead, I mark the cap with a sharpie. I have a number/naming convention I use, typically something like Year-Batch Abbreviation For example, 10-04 HB is the fourth beer of 2010, and is my Hellcat Bitter.


9

For removing your own labels that you apply to your bottles, use a label with a hot-soak water soluable adhesive. When you're ready to reuse your bottles, a soak in hot soapy water is all that's needed to slide the labels off. Removing labels from store-bought beverage bottles can be hit or miss because each bottler can use different label materials and ...


9

If you can get Grolsch Amber in the 16 oz swing-top bottles, they are awesome. They're heavier-duty than most 12 oz non-returnables and with the swing-top you don't have to worry about capping (and most LHBSs carry the rubber washers for them if yours get old and crack). The only drawback is that the sides are not smooth, so on-the-bottle labeling doesn't ...


9

For cleaning, I rinse bottles with hot water immediately after pouring them out into my glass. They don't need any sort of washing with soap at that point. I keep them off to the side until I have a whole bunch ready for de-labeling, which is an overnight soak in a sink full of PBW. Most labels just slide right off the next day. A quick rinse and the bottles ...


8

Go to www.cwcrate.com - there you can get some pretty cool plastic beer cases. They hold up really well too, I've been using mine for quite some time now and there no way they are going to fall apart. What's cool about them is that you can just take your case out in the yard, open it up and pour a bag of ice in and you're all set. Update: cwcrate.com is ...


8

Dishwasher detergent is generally not recommended because most detergents have perfumes and rinse agents. The perfumes tend to stay on the glass until a thorough hand-rinse, and the surfactants in rinse agents destroy your beer's head and lacing. If you can run the dishwasher without any of these (I'm not sure from your description if that's possible), the ...


7

Soda bottles are made of PET plastic, which is actually the same stuff that the "Better Bottle" carboys are made out of. The plastic itself is very compatible with beer. The biggest down sides are the color and transparency that others mentioned for light destroying the flavor. The other area of concern is the caps and pressure. As far as pressure is ...


7

I've never used it, either. I tried once, but without soaking the bottle it was all but useless. And soaking provided all the clean I needed. So no, I don't think they're necessary.


7

Use a brush if you have solids in your bottles like if you picked up an empty case from the store and it had bits of lemon slices or cigarette butts. Also, from your own bottles look out for yeast if you didn't empty your bottles completely when you drank them.


7

I have almost exclusively used twist off bottles. I have never had any issues with any of them. They are generally well carbonated (I blame myself for any issues there), and I haven't noticed any major off flavours from my bottles. The capper that I use was one that came in a kit from a local brewshop and I don't think it's anything special. My ...


7

I soak in OxiClean Free, warm to hot water for 20 minutes or so. Then, rinse thoroughly with hot water. It helps to shake around the rinse water in the bottle, as OxiClean leaves a slick film that won't come right off unless you agitate the rinse water or use a scrub brush. OxiClean is great at stripping off beer residue and also helps to remove the ...


7

Most of the time capping on foam is a technique used when filling bottles off of kegs. There is always some foaming that happens during the fill off the keg. Obviously it can't be done if you are using flat beer with priming sugar. But if you are using some sort of filling method with carbed-up beer that results in not foam you can induce the foam with a ...


7

Swirl the bottle. I like to point the bottle down, and draw a circle with it, so to speak. The centrifugal force of the circular motion pushes the beer to the bottle walls and created a void in the center, where air can enter. Pros: Seems to be the fastest method I've tried. Cons: Is the extra energy worth the time savings? Am I really saving time, when I ...


7

The bottle I just checked has a tiny 13 imprinted in the mold, and filled to overflowing, it held 13 fl. oz. It appears that a 12oz bottle of beer is a 13oz bottle with 12 oz of beer in it.


6

Brown bottles are you best bet, they block the most amount of skunkyness causing UV. There is no benefit to using a clear or green bottle other than you might already have them hanging around, and people might feel like they're drinking a certain style beer if you serve it in the bottle.


6

Bottles usually explode either because of bottling too soon before fermentation is complete or because too much primer was used.


6

How to Brew by John Palmer recommends soaking equipment for 20 minutes, and says that rinsing isn't absolutely necessary for the recommended concentration. The concentration he mentions is 1 tablespoon of bleach to 1 gallon of water (4 ml per liter). I avoid bleach. I'm too worried about it introducing off flavors if it's not completely gone, and would ...


6

The only consideration that comes into bottle choice really is serving size and glass strength due to carbonation levels. (Some highly carbonated styles see thicker glass for safety reasons.) Then there is bottles that will accept corks. Across all the different styles I've encountered in corked bottles I can't say its specific to any style. Again you see ...


5

I design my labels in Pixelmator. They are pretty small at 2.25" x 1.25" but this way I don't use too much paper. Speaking of paper I like to take grocery bags and cut them into 8.5" x 11" sheets, then feed them into my inkjet printer just like standard letter sized paper. Grocery bag paper has a nice texture, thickness and brown color that isn't as ...


5

I started writing on the bottle caps with a marker, but it could be hard to write on the cap. Lately I've been using circle shaped garage sale stickers on the caps. It's easy to use and I don't have to remove anything from the bottle itself. If you can find the multi-colored labels, it makes it much easier to identify the beer at a glance.


5

They're all good if they have paper labels. There's an easy trick to get them off. Get a cheap 5 gallon bucket from home depot (or where ever). Get some oxyclean. Fill the bucket with a water/oxyclean solution. Put it somewhere out of the way. When you're done with a beer, put the bottle in the bucket. Within a couple of days the labels should just ...


5

I think it depends on how you treat your bottles. If you sanitize them with heat - through baking or boiling - then you're giving the bottles a finite life span. As for how many heat cycles they can take, I have no idea. And it surely varies from bottle to bottle. If you sanitize your bottles chemically (E.g., Star San), then I think you can use bottles ...


5

Size doesn't matter. It's completely up to you to use whatever you want. If you're bottling correctly, the sediment-to-beer ration should stay the same between bottles. That's because by the time you bottle, the beer should have fallen very clear with very little yeast still suspended. That tiny bit of yeast will wake up in the bottle, grow and divide as ...



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