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11

If you are sure your primed the bottles then they should most definitely carbonate. It could be a temperature issue creating sluggish yeast. What temperature are your bottles at? Get them to 70F or better and they'll start carbonating. Put one on top of your water heater for a few days and see what happens. EDIT: You know another great place to warm ...


10

I would strongly recommend brown glass bottles for bottling (hey why not ditch bottles and switch to kegging!). As mentioned there are many potential issues with reusing plastic bottles. Water Bottles are not designed to hold pressure. I keep my kegs around 11PSI. Homebrewers always recommend to be careful with naturally carbed bottles as they might ...


5

Many people trade beer all the time. It is legal, except via US Postal Service. I think the laws around shipping via USPS are in flux, but without confirmation I'll suggest you stick to FedEx and UPS. More info at: http://www.reddit.com/r/beertrade/comments/atztu/trading_and_packaging_tips/ ...


5

You can pop one open now, and it's a good learning experience to keep drinking your beer regularly so that you can see how it develops. I know, tough life! And you'll probably find like I do that the beer is at it's peak when there's one or two bottles left. 8 days may not be enough time for all the CO2 in the headspace to dissolve back into the beer, so ...


5

It's very much temperature dependent. In an episode of brewstrong, Charlie Bamforth mentions that the rate of oxidization is proportional to temperature, and increases 3 fold for each temperature increase of 10°C/18°F. So, if your beer is stored at 4°C (39°F), it will oxidize 9 times slower than if it's stored at 24°C (75°F). Loosely speaking, if it takes ...


5

It does sound like your priming sugar wasn't mixed very well. That said, if the flat bottles are sweet to the taste there's something else afoot. When I bottle I usually mix a cup of water with 3/4 cup of corn sugar and stick it in the microwave for a couple minutes to boil it. I then let it cool for a while before pouring the solution into the bottom of ...


5

Don't worry about the foam, as far as I remember Charlie Tally, Head Chemist at 5 Star, has said that the starsan is broken down by the yeast. Also, when you fill the bottle most of the foam comes out as a "StarSan Worm", so there's relatively little left in the bottle. If you've not had any problems with head in your beer then your existing methods are ...


5

There are two ways to get carbonated beer in bottles: natural conditioning, and force carbonation. Natural conditioning is a process in which a small amount of fermentable sugar is added to the beer at bottling time. The yeast in the beer will ferment the sugar, adding carbon dioxide and a small amount of alcohol. Because the yeast become active to produce ...


4

You can find viynl labels here BeerClings.com. They are reusable and work very well. Hope this helps.


4

If you laser print onto Avery labels (or probably almost any brand of label), it's pretty resilient without a protective coat - I have some labels on bottles that I printed two years ago, that have survived 4 or 5 batches, soaks in StarSan, etc. In fact, the labels I have are harder to get off than almost every commercial label, which is why I stopped ...


3

K-meta alone will not. You need the one-two punch of Potassium Sorbate (to prevent the yeast from reproducing) and Potassium metabisulfite (to kill existing cells). Note that this will take a bit of time, so you should expect to see a bit more of a gravity drop in the mean time. Using cold to slow yeast growth at the same time is advised.


3

It can be hard to see a thin ring of black mold in an amber bottle, even when holding it up against the light. I'd strongly recommend you use a bottle washer on a faucet. Really hot water doesn't kill everything but it does tend to clean well. Here's one as an example: http://morebeer.com/view_product/15964//Bottle_and_Carboy_Washer I'd also recommend ...


3

In the strictest sense, yes. You just need a container that will hold pressure. However, plastic scratches more easily than glass, which means they could be harboring wild yeast or bacteria that are very difficult to remove. Also, most beer bottles are brown glass because that particular color blocks most of the wavelengths of light that cause the ...


3

According to this cidermaker, "regular" beer bottles can hold up to 3 atm (45 psi), and "champagne" bottles can hold up to 6 atm (90 psi). Champagne-style bottles with the large dimple in the bottom are the strongest. That bottom will withstand more pressure before failure than a flat bottom. I bet a standard crown cap would fail before the bottle--you'd ...


3

I had the same issue with an oatmeal stout. I also used 4oz of sugar. It ended up okay in the end though after turning the bottles upside down, gently rousing the yeast and raising the temperature. Not familiar with that yeast strain, but I'd imagine 64 is too low for the yeast to be happy. Raise the temp, swirl the bottles upside down and give it a couple ...


3

You're doing something wrong. I've broken exactly one 22 oz bottle in 10 years of homebrewing, probably due to overcarbonation, not opening mechanical stress. (Also, if I broke glass anywhere near liquid, I would toss it all categorically. I can not fathom how you think opening a 12oz bottle of beer that splinters "everywhere" does not get "in the brew". ...


3

To build on what tobias said: In both scenarios, if the beer is not crystal clear before bottling, the amount sediment in the bottles will be greater. You can reduce, but not eliminate, sediment in naturally conditioned beer by ensuring the beer is clear before bottling. The more sediment you start with, the more you will end up with. There are ...


2

Check out weatherproof vinyl labels. According to this site, you can print on them with a standard inkjet printer: The material is weatherproof and the ink from a standard inkjet printer will encapsulate into a specially formulated top-coating upon printing. They make it sound like as the ink dries it soaks into the vinyl label. I know that ...


2

Have you considered either having the bottles etched (like people do for weddings) or (screen?) printed on with paint? Etching usually just involes an acid or mild abrasive to take the gloss off the glass--it's permanent and shouldn't compromise the bottles. Painting should be near-permanent, hot water and possibly cleansers might fade or peel the paint ...


2

I wonder if you could get your own design professionally printed on those "vinyl" like sheets that stick to windows? Then you can peel them on and off almost indefinitely. Not really and answer, but whatever.


2

Actually, yes. I've read that a longneck industry standard bottle is only rated to about 4 volumes of CO2 - so more highly carbonated beer styles, like weizens, lambics, and certain Belgians, need heavier glass bottles. The last thing a brewery wants is to release a batch of bottle bombs, so the ratings typically have a generous safety factor applied, but ...


2

Water bottles should be alright. My only concern is that they are not intended to hold pressure. Water bottles tend to be a thinner plastic than their carbonated soda bottle counterpart. I suspect that the pressure created by the beer is not enough to burst even the thinnest plastic bottle (assuming there are no weak spots), so it should work. I have used ...


2

I used a 2 liter Soda bottle and it worked very nicely and was easy to bottle. It seems like it would be the same as the smaller water bottles. Just make sure they stay out of the light since they are clear.


2

FedEx and UPS both require special alcohol shipping contracts that I assume are not available to consumers. USPS prohibits all alcohol shipments. However, you could just report the contents as "glassware" and I'm sure they would never know. As for packaging, just use common sense. Glass bottles are not really that fragile — think about how they are stacked ...


2

IMPO I wouldn't do anything. I have have some batches that have taken 5 weeks to carbonate. You mentioned that the last time you tried them they didn't taste as flat as the first time, which would indicate that they are carbing up, just slowly. Good call on rotating them and putting at a little higher temp. This should get them going, just have patience. I ...


2

The metallic/chemical taste to me suggests contamination at the bottle level. Maybe some of these were insufficiently cleaned or sterilized. The wrong microbes could also impact the flavor by breaking down the flavors you want into ones you don't. Is there any possibility you put more care into cleaning the longer bottles (as they would be possibly more ...


1

Some generic HP toner cartridges come packed in handy cylindrical bubble wrap things that are just the right size for a beer bottle. I've used those successfully, as well as just bubble wrap and paper or peanuts. As long as the bottles will not contact each other or the ground, you should be fine.


1

You've got 5 or 6 gallons of this stuff! Go ahead and try one! I almost always try one after 2 or 3 days. It's often quite enjoyable in the first week. Once I drank about 12 bottles in the first week -- and enjoyed every one of them!


1

Agreed with above poster. I made an American Amber ale with 4 whole vanilla beans added in secondary and bottled it. I tried one 2 weeks after bottling and their was a bitter taste I didnt expect and the vanila after taste was so pronounced as to make a negative impression. I thought I had wasted 5 gallons of beer. I waited another week and tried again, and ...


1

I always open one at 7 days, just to test carbonation. As far as aging, yes, it can change a beer significantly. I've had beers really come into their own after 2 weeks, and after 4 months. There is no hard-and-fast rule here.



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