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For a quick answer for a homebrew definition of "Bottle Conditioning". No Not without a lot of extra work and or using gimmick devices. Bottle Conditioning in homebrew generally means to allow suspended yeast after fermintation to carbonate the beer to a desired c02 volume by feeding it a small amount of fermentable sugar, usually 4oz Corn Sugar for a ...


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The term krausen, refers to the head formed during fermentation. I guess I'm unclear as to why you would try to make a mini wort batch by steeping grains. The sugars from steeping are mostly unfermentable long chain sugars having not been converted by enzymes as they would in a mash. These will carry through and taste as underattenuation or sweet, ...


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Steeping caramel / crystal malts in water may still extract fermentables. As far as I know up to about 30% of what you would get from mash. See this site - it claims that Special B will give out a lot of sugar. If I read the numbers correctly, every 3 grams of steeped Special B will introduce about 1 gram of fermentables. Substitute grams for any unit of ...


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Corn sugar will add a bit of alcohol, which will affect your reading. That is my guess as to why the FG in the bottle is lower.


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Have a look at captainbrew.com Priming Sugar Calculator here. You can also create recipes, adjust gravity or bitterness, scale a recipe, create brew sessions and many more. There are also other calculators included like Yeast Pitching Rate, Keg Carbonation, ABV , Sparge Water, Washed Yeast.


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Double check all your gravity readings and measurements of priming sugar, considering temperatures. The SG's you noted could be off If temperature wasn't factored in the hydrometer readings. The over carbonation would suggest an overdose of priming sugar, your 5gal batch at 68° would use only 3oz for 2.0 co2 volumes for example. Or the bottle conditioning ...


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2 Stages for Fermentation Puting times on the stages differ with each batch and shouldn't be held to a strict schedule. Primary This is your first fermenting vessle, and where the most active yeast activity is and most if not all fermentable sugars are consumed. Primary is done once the yeast has floculated and settled to the bottom. For lagers when yeast ...



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