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1

I'm assuming glass bottles with appropriate head-room and that your porter has an average alcohol pretty near the maximum tolerance of the yeast you used. If those assumptions are reasonable and if you've used an appropriate amount of priming sugar, then you are probably okay at 2.5 days. The risks are two-fold, vibration and heat. I would suggest that ...


2

Five gallons worth of priming sugar going into four gallons of beer is most likely your problem. The possibility of inadequately stirring it into the beer before bottling (surprisingly not all that uncommon for beginners) may exasperate the problem to the point of bottle bombs. If over-carbonation is a common problem for several of your bottles, you may ...


1

To answer your question, yes, you did the right thing. The residual yeast in solution that were eating the priming sugar and producing CO2 will go dormant when it gets cold. Putting the beer in the fridge simply stopped any more natural carbonating so you can drink them at any point now. Did you thoroughly mix the priming sugar into the wort or did you ...


1

Definitely don't bottle this right now. It is very possible that the yeast will slowly continue fermenting this and create bottle bombs. What is I think it is unrealistic to expect WLP 002 to do the rest of the work from here unless you wait a while. WLP 002 is a medium attenuator, and going from 1.110 to 1.045 (60% attenuation), it is nearing in the ...


2

The yeast will eventually ferment out more sugar, but it can take many months. I have a High FG 12% beer in a keg that I thought was done, only to find it had built up a lot of pressure as the beer continued fermenting. (To be more thorough I should take a sample, degass it and measure the FG to see how much it's dropped.)


3

I would definitely not bottle yet. You may get bottle bombs, but you'll definitely get a beer that's too sweet. It's only been 2 weeks and for a high gravity barley wine, that's not much at all. You could warm it up in the 70sF (24C?) and see if you can get more fermentation, but I suspect you won't get much more with that yeast. Personally, I would ...



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