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4

Force carbonation is very common for homebrewers. I'd imagine any homebrewer with a kegging setup does force carbonation by default. I would guess, too, that it's much more often than not done without active filtering. Long primary, cold-crashing and careful racking will minimize the amount of yeast transfer for most styles and beers. There is no signficant ...


4

Here is a good test of what you are looking to do. http://brulosophy.com/2014/08/12/primary-only-vs-transfer-to-secondary-exbeeriment-results/ Here is the conclusion of the test: Once all the data was collected and I wasn’t worried about blowing through these kegs of beer, I started serving it to people stopping by. On a few occasions, with folks who ...


4

Give it some time. I had a stout take about a month before there was a decent head.


3

Looks Fine.. almost. You do need some yeast nutrients though. And.... 2 cups sugar to 1 gal puts you in Apple wine territory, and will be hard for a bakers yeast to attenuate fully. Also adding a priming sugar will do little with this recipe as the yeast will have died from its ABV tollerance. When I make cider it's like this. 1) Sanitize everthing: ...


3

Temperature is your most likely culprit. Other possible cause could be not enough yeast in suspension. Typical if fining agents are used in secondary. You're probably past the window for only temp correction to help your existing bottles. The sweet and low carbonation, sounds like the yeast isn't doing much with the priming sugar. Either not enough or ...


3

Yes, priming sugar is usually added to the carboy or bottling bucket just prior to bottling for ease. However there are "carbonation drops" you can alternately add to each bottle. These are just sugar. You can add more yeast, but it's generally not needed. No, glass carboys are not designed to hold any pressure. Yes, the beer will be flat unless fermentaion ...


3

Beer needs to be warmer when you bottle condition. This allows the yeast to work hard at getting the priming sugar into CO2. However, too warm and the beer will stale faster. I recommend moving the box to a cooler area of the house (like a cupboard that is not against a wall that gets direct sunlight). DO NOT COOL THE BEER! Leave it for two weeks, then put ...


2

0.004 difference is also 1 Blg difference, to say it in units I know. That's pretty big here. At the same time, it's also pretty possible your fermentation has finished. If in doubt, I would try fast fermentation test. Take generous amount of baker's yeast, fresh. Like, 1/5 cup. Fill the rest of cup with your beer, stir, put in dry warm place and wait a day ...


2

Are we talking about lack of carbonation or a missing head here? You say it's flat which would mean there is no CO2 but it seems like there is. A beer doesn't taste flat without a head if it has CO2 in it. If your beer doesn't carbonate there is either not enough yeast and/or not enough sugar. What you ca do: turn the bottles up-side-down, maybe your yeast ...


2

If you want to experiment with the difference between "primary-only" and "primary-secondary", then rack half of your batch into a new fermentor, and bottle both halves at the same time.


2

Steeping caramel / crystal malts in water may still extract fermentables. As far as I know up to about 30% of what you would get from mash. See this site - it claims that Special B will give out a lot of sugar. If I read the numbers correctly, every 3 grams of steeped Special B will introduce about 1 gram of fermentables. Substitute grams for any unit of ...


2

That depends on the question you want to answer. bottling the primary-only batch after a week but leaving bottles for the extra week to let the primary-secondary batch catch up and How does the beer taste if we bottle a week early? leaving the batch in primary for an extra week (assuming we weren't disturbing it by transferring a lot of it for ...


2

Nope, you don't need to change a thing.


1

That's a lot of priming sugar for one gallon, your bottles are in danger of popping if your yeast can handle it and it's left for too long. You don't mention total sugar amounts added, gravity readings or yeast used, so a couple of things could happen here: Yeast alcohol tolerance is reached, and nothing more will happen. Your cider will be flat and ...


1

Corn sugar will add a bit of alcohol, which will affect your reading. That is my guess as to why the FG in the bottle is lower.


1

Put in an unfermentable sugar prior to carbonating, like lactose. Or sweeten it, carbonate in the the bottle and then pasteurize in a dishwasher to kill the yeast before it consumes all the sugars. Obviously you'd need to do this in glass bottles and it the right temperature. Personally, the single time I've made bottle carbonated cider I was perfectly ...


1

Nope. Keep your priming sugars the same. Explanation: The sugars we usually use for carbonation is 100% (or near 100%) fermentable. Thus, it will cause the same amount of carbonation.


1

For a quick answer for a homebrew definition of "Bottle Conditioning". No Not without a lot of extra work and or using gimmick devices. Bottle Conditioning in homebrew generally means to allow suspended yeast after fermintation to carbonate the beer to a desired c02 volume by feeding it a small amount of fermentable sugar, usually 4oz Corn Sugar for a ...



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