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9

You will need to add the right amount of priming sugar to carbonate the beer in the bottles. There are lots of online priming sugar calculators. In theory, you could bottle the beer before fermentation had completed, and let the remaining sugars carbonate the beer, but this would be very hard to do right. If you bottle with too much residual sugar, your ...


5

Different yeast strains can look a little different in the bottle as well. One characteristic of yeast is how well it "compacts" at the bottom of the fermentor or bottle. Some strains, like English Ale yeasts, are known for creating a very tight, compacted sediment, whereas others leave the yeast cake much more "fluffy". And yes, the yeast caked that you ...


5

You will need to add priming sugar if the beer has reached its terminal gravity with the yeast being used. In this example, despite the 80% attenuation the remaining 20% is not usually fermentable sugars. Its comprised of protein, dextrans and other molecules in solution that are largely ignored by your primary yeast strain. Lastly, reported attenuation ...


4

Yes, perfectly normal. It may be done carbing or it may take a few more days.


4

I would guess that it's only partially yeast. The majority of it may be trub that was still in suspension when you bottled. Bottle conditioning will result in yeast in the bottle, but it's unlikely that 1/2 in. of sediment is all due to yeast.


4

You don't need to worry about "saving" the batch. Even if you left them in the fridge they'd still carb, just very slowly. It might take months. But there's absolutely nothing wrong with taking them out of the fridge for a couple weeks to carb, then returning them to the fridge once the process is complete.


3

I would definitely not bottle yet. You may get bottle bombs, but you'll definitely get a beer that's too sweet. It's only been 2 weeks and for a high gravity barley wine, that's not much at all. You could warm it up in the 70sF (24C?) and see if you can get more fermentation, but I suspect you won't get much more with that yeast. Personally, I would ...


3

The yeast will still carbonate at fridge temperatures; just very slowly. Think months instead of weeks. I presume you put the beer in the fridge as you want to start trying to drink them. My advice would be to take your beer out of the fridge, and let them warm up to room temperature (65-75 degrees), and just stick them in a closet for a a few weeks. If you ...


3

In your case, I believe you are asking whether you can bottle without adding anything and expect the beer to carbonate based on residual sugar -- on that point, yes, you do need to add some sort of fermentable substance for the yeast to produce the CO2 for in-bottle carbonation. But for the record, if we read your question literally, then no -- there are ...


3

You may or may not need extra time, but my experience is that it never hurts to give the beer more time. 4-5 weeks will be fine. The best thing to do would be to start taking gravity readings after 3-4 weeks and taste the sample. Between the gravity and the taste, you should be able to tell when it's done.


2

The shortest time I've ever given a beer from grain to glass (including 2 days of forced carbonation) was 19 days, and it was a 1.087 Imperial IPA. That said, I do recall it tasting better after a week in the keg, and the malt bill was a 50/50 split of American and English 2-row, so nothing fancy aside from the tremendous amount of hops. In my experience, ...


2

My first thought is that the beer was not very uniform when bottled. Some brewers I know try to get scientific about mixing without introducing oxygen at bottle time; me I just mark the first few and last few from the batch and worry less!


2

Try increasing your room temp for a about a week and then fridge overnight. If that doesn't help then it's back to the drawing board I'm afraid.


2

Yes, it is standard to add sugar for priming, as most beers are fermented to completion before bottling. The chocolate roasted malt does not have extra sugars, exactly. The kilning process is going to convert some sugars, caramelize some and also produce some other color and flavor compounds, but those sugars are going to be present (and some unfermentable) ...


2

A quick google on 'how to pour homebrew' returns a few results. This one is pretty good: (source: http://www.whatwouldjesusbrew.co.uk/pouring-instructions-for-homebrew-beer-labels/) Other formatting options from what seems to be the same person: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/homebrew-pouring-instructions-337652/ ...


2

Five gallons worth of priming sugar going into four gallons of beer is most likely your problem. The possibility of inadequately stirring it into the beer before bottling (surprisingly not all that uncommon for beginners) may exasperate the problem to the point of bottle bombs. If over-carbonation is a common problem for several of your bottles, you may ...


2

The yeast will eventually ferment out more sugar, but it can take many months. I have a High FG 12% beer in a keg that I thought was done, only to find it had built up a lot of pressure as the beer continued fermenting. (To be more thorough I should take a sample, degass it and measure the FG to see how much it's dropped.)


1

I'm assuming glass bottles with appropriate head-room and that your porter has an average alcohol pretty near the maximum tolerance of the yeast you used. If those assumptions are reasonable and if you've used an appropriate amount of priming sugar, then you are probably okay at 2.5 days. The risks are two-fold, vibration and heat. I would suggest that ...


1

To answer your question, yes, you did the right thing. The residual yeast in solution that were eating the priming sugar and producing CO2 will go dormant when it gets cold. Putting the beer in the fridge simply stopped any more natural carbonating so you can drink them at any point now. Did you thoroughly mix the priming sugar into the wort or did you ...


1

Definitely don't bottle this right now. It is very possible that the yeast will slowly continue fermenting this and create bottle bombs. What is I think it is unrealistic to expect WLP 002 to do the rest of the work from here unless you wait a while. WLP 002 is a medium attenuator, and going from 1.110 to 1.045 (60% attenuation), it is nearing in the ...


1

Carbonating with yeast and priming sugar, carbonating with a CO2 tank and aging a beer (under any number of conditions) are all different animals. You can carbonate in a keg with yeast and priming sugar (treating it as a large "bottle"), but like the other posters said, it's not going to work well at fridge temps. Aging a beer has different effects depending ...


1

Carbonation from conditioning is cuaused by yeast. Generally, refrigerating beer reduces the temperature below the yeasts active temperature and halts conditioning. Beer taste changing from aging is cuaused by yeast and other factors. Not all beers improve with age. All beers have there prime. It may be fresh out of the fermenter, such with lower alcohol ...


1

My bet is that after only 3 days, it wasn't really finished. In combination with the addition of amylase enzyme, you're simply seeing more fermentation activity. Fermentation does not always have an obvious visual component; gravity readings over time are the only solid way of knowing. My corny kegs are marked as "good" up to 150psi. 15 psi is extremely low ...


1

Generally speaking, the amount of time for proper conditioning after completion of primary fermentation increases with the OG of the post-boil wort. It can also be dependent on beer style and personal taste. A low gravity (1.040's) ale can be ready in 2 weeks. A high gravity russian imperial stout can sometimes take 6 months to develop the flavors desired ...


1

I buy extract kits complete with instructions. All of the kits I bought say ferment for 2 weeks then bottle. Then condition 2 weeks in the bottle. (one exception being a pumpkin spice ale that required 8 weeks in primary). That being said, my blonde ales seem to like the 2 weeks just fine but the cream ale didnt really reach its prime until 3 weeks. This I ...


1

This is possible, but not in a scientifically measurable way. Try this: Hold one of your bottles of beer up to the light so you can see the air gap that expands from the top of the bottle down to the top of the beer in the bottle. Quickly turn the bottle upside down then back again, with a slight amount of force, but no need to shake it. Observe the air ...


1

You will want to dry-hop at normal/fermentation temps for the best hop oil extraction. Dry-hopping cold is going to be an inefficient use of precious hops. If you're worried about (or better: experience via experiment) low bottle carbonation/refermentation, you can always pitch new yeast during bottling. Some highly-flocculant strains might be ...


1

You should have enough yeast still in solution after cold crashing before you bottle. You should not have any issues with this much time. If you were to wait a few months then I would worry. If you do cold crash in the bottle there will be some increased sediment but if you are careful when you pour no a problem If you are going to dry hop in your ...


1

You were methodical about the important aspects in your write-up, and nothing looks suspect there. And since you primed with carbonation drops, that would rule-out non-uniform distribution of bottling sugar. And you later said: we sampled each other's glasses, and agreed that mine was much better than his So it goes beyond carbonation. Yes, less ...


1

It could very well be due to fermentation problems. Read this...it has tests that can help you diagnose the problem. http://byo.com/stories/article/indices/35-head-retention/697-getting-good-beer-foam-techniques Also, if it's an extract batch, keep in mind that extract beers generally have less foam. Foam is produced by protein and a lot of protein gets ...



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