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8

Hopefully I can add something here, making the answer non-duplicate. In regards to 'need to add sugar', it is much better to let the yeast ferment everything that they can in the beer, and then add a measured amount of additional sugar. The other choice is to try to predict where the yeast will actually stop, which requires accurate measurement of sugars, ...


8

The yeast is dormant, not likely dead. Leave them in a warm place for a couple weeks or so and they should be fine.


5

Yep. Just keep it away from sun light. I do this all winter without problems.


4

If bottle-conditioning is completely finished, there's no reason it won't be ready to drink as soon as it's cold, if you're only considering carbonation. The amount of CO2 in solution is indeed determined by temperature and pressure, but since we're talking about a closed system, the total amount of CO2 inside the bottle can't change once it's there, it can ...


4

Give it some time. I had a stout take about a month before there was a decent head.


3

Beer needs to be warmer when you bottle condition. This allows the yeast to work hard at getting the priming sugar into CO2. However, too warm and the beer will stale faster. I recommend moving the box to a cooler area of the house (like a cupboard that is not against a wall that gets direct sunlight). DO NOT COOL THE BEER! Leave it for two weeks, then put ...


3

Be patient. It will carb, it will just take longer. Wait another week or so, then start sampling to see if it's carbed yet.


3

I would definitely not bottle yet. You may get bottle bombs, but you'll definitely get a beer that's too sweet. It's only been 2 weeks and for a high gravity barley wine, that's not much at all. You could warm it up in the 70sF (24C?) and see if you can get more fermentation, but I suspect you won't get much more with that yeast. Personally, I would ...


2

Five gallons worth of priming sugar going into four gallons of beer is most likely your problem. The possibility of inadequately stirring it into the beer before bottling (surprisingly not all that uncommon for beginners) may exasperate the problem to the point of bottle bombs. If over-carbonation is a common problem for several of your bottles, you may ...


2

Many moons ago, I did a test on freezing yeast (the dregs from various Trappist types). After a few weeks in the freezer I thawed them gently and made a little starter culture of each one; they were slow taking off, but certainly some of the yeast had survived. I think you should be fine.


2

It depends entirely on what you mean by 'the nature' or 'quality of of the carbonation'. If we're talking carbonation and only carbonation (literally the level of dissolved carbon dioxide in the finished product, usually expressed as volumes of CO2/volume of liquid, or as parts per million) there's no difference between reaching that by bottle-conditioning ...


2

Assuming the same beer properties, the surface tension should be equal between force carbonation and bottle carbonation. Assuming equal surface tension, the CO2 bubbles should be equivalent in size. With equal temperature, pressure, time, and surface tension, the CO2 bubble size should be equivalent.


2

I would not say that there is an 'optimal time' but several factors can affect your cellaring decisions. Hoppy beers will stay hoppy longer when cold. Other spices probably do too - I've noticed that orange peel also goes away quickly. Chill haze will go away with a long time spent in the fridge. As far as CO2 goes, all that gas is already dissolved, but ...


2

The yeast will eventually ferment out more sugar, but it can take many months. I have a High FG 12% beer in a keg that I thought was done, only to find it had built up a lot of pressure as the beer continued fermenting. (To be more thorough I should take a sample, degass it and measure the FG to see how much it's dropped.)


2

Are we talking about lack of carbonation or a missing head here? You say it's flat which would mean there is no CO2 but it seems like there is. A beer doesn't taste flat without a head if it has CO2 in it. If your beer doesn't carbonate there is either not enough yeast and/or not enough sugar. What you ca do: turn the bottles up-side-down, maybe your yeast ...


2

Nope, you don't need to change a thing.


1

Nope. Keep your priming sugars the same. Explanation: The sugars we usually use for carbonation is 100% (or near 100%) fermentable. Thus, it will cause the same amount of carbonation.


1

You're going to be attempting a fine line of enough yeast to consume sugars to properly carbonate the beer versus reducing sediment in the bottle. The sediment you're seeing could be a variety of things generally there are a few best practices. Limit trub and other particulate from the boil that makes it into the fermenter. Limiting trub Limit ...


1

The CO2 dissolution in the beer is a function of temperature, gravity and head space pressure in bottle. It is not a linear function, it resembles a exponential function. @Pepi is right about having a feeling that the longer it stays on the fridge, more carbonated it will be, the CO2 dissolution keeps going on, but after some time the increase is ...


1

I'm not aware of how the temperature will effect the carbonation and CO2. I have been more interested in the flavor impact of the serving temperature. So the best answer for that would depend on two factors 1) What temperature you're storing them at now, and 2) what temperature do you want to serve at? I tend to store my beer around "cellar" temperature in ...


1

Being involved with the AHA and having judged national finals several times, I can tell you there are 2 concerns...first, there should be nothing on the bottle to identify it came from you. That's not too difficult. But with the number of entries we get these days, storage is a concern. The reason you should use standard 12 oz. bottles and caps is so that ...


1

I would definitely repitch fresh yeast when priming an Imp. stout. I've never used the Danstar stuff, but it seems like it has the chops to handle a high-alcohol brew so I'd say give it a shot. If your Imp. Stout is in the 9%+ category and it's been aging for ~4 months, most of the yeast in there won't be too happy. Some will definitely survive, but it ...


1

I'm assuming glass bottles with appropriate head-room and that your porter has an average alcohol pretty near the maximum tolerance of the yeast you used. If those assumptions are reasonable and if you've used an appropriate amount of priming sugar, then you are probably okay at 2.5 days. The risks are two-fold, vibration and heat. I would suggest that ...


1

To answer your question, yes, you did the right thing. The residual yeast in solution that were eating the priming sugar and producing CO2 will go dormant when it gets cold. Putting the beer in the fridge simply stopped any more natural carbonating so you can drink them at any point now. Did you thoroughly mix the priming sugar into the wort or did you ...


1

Definitely don't bottle this right now. It is very possible that the yeast will slowly continue fermenting this and create bottle bombs. What is I think it is unrealistic to expect WLP 002 to do the rest of the work from here unless you wait a while. WLP 002 is a medium attenuator, and going from 1.110 to 1.045 (60% attenuation), it is nearing in the ...


1

A high gravity beer (high ABV) can take more than a month to carbonate at 70 degrees and if you let it get too cold it may never get to where you want it



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