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2

In a word, no. What you are experiencing has another cause.


2

It's hard to say an exact or even a close general time. If the whole fermentation hasn't gone more than a month or so you may still have enough yeast in suspension. Typically if the mead or beer is very clear it won't have enough yeast to condition. Cold crashing or other finings will drastically reduce your chances of good bottle conditioning. I'm ...


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While c02 does absorb easier at colder temperatures, I doubt you would get inconsistency if they are fully conditioned and chilled completely. The extra chill time could be it just finishing conditioning, as many yeast will still be active at fridge temps. Possible causes could be conditioning wasn't complete or different amounts of yeast or fermentables in ...


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I usually dissolve my sugar in boiling water, before adding it to the bottle or kegs for priming. I have in the past just added half a spoonful of granulated sugar directly to the bottles with no ill effects. If you are worried this may be a source of your off flavours then make a sugar syrup, and boil it for 15 min, then allow to cool with a lid on, and ...


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I agree that it's hard to say, but in general you have a long time. I have had lagers at 35F for 2 months and they carbed fine with no need for more yeast.


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It is hard to generalise as Evil Zymurgist says. You are best off checking the number of yest per ml, with a haemocytometer and a microscope if you have such devices available. As long as you have ~100,000/ml then you will be good to bottle condition most ales with those in suspension. If you have less than this then best to add a little extra. Also, if you ...



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