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14

No. If you are that dire for things to happen quickly fill one plastic bottle each time you bottle. It will be firm once the beer is carbed. You can simply re-use 16-20oz soda bottles for this, or buy plastic beer bottles with screw on caps.


13

I wouldn't bother, but if you do, don't shake them hard, because it will denature some of the foam-producing proteins, and has a chance of reducing head retention. Be lazy and let it do its thing.


13

The caps are not perfectly smooth - they contain nucleation points, imperfections or dirt along the surface, where a bubble could form (similar to how boils are formed at nucleation points when heating water). As the cold water heats up, dissolved gasses are forced out of solution. Some of this gas dissipates, but some of it will attach to the nucleation ...


12

I recently had my first bottle bomb (actually 2 side-by-side) after over 10 years of brewing. The fact that they were in a cardboard box helped. But if I were you I'd immediately: refrigerate all bottles, and carefully open and re-cap each one. Never mind about planning for it to be easier to clean up. Imagine one of those shards of glass finding its ...


11

If you are sure your primed the bottles then they should most definitely carbonate. It could be a temperature issue creating sluggish yeast. What temperature are your bottles at? Get them to 70F or better and they'll start carbonating. Put one on top of your water heater for a few days and see what happens. EDIT: You know another great place to warm ...


11

It depends on the beer and the storage conditions. To start, the stronger and hoppier the beer, the longer it will keep. For instance, a hefeweizen won't keep as long as a barleywine. The temperature is also important. Generally, cooler is better. The main thing is to avoid excessively high (85+) temps. Avoiding temp swings helps, but it's mainly high ...


10

I think the biggest problem with one person drinking from a growler of beer (even if you want to drink the three pints yourself) is the pour and repour. Your surface area issues and estimations in releation to a normal 12 or 22oz bottle are good. However, if you poured three 4oz samples from a 12 oz bottle you'd be stirring up the yeast just as often. To ...


10

With a beer that strong, you probably should have repitched at bottling. There are several factors that the yeast must fight in this situation, including: high alcohol strength - almost 10% ABV cool temperature - the bottom two degrees of the yeast's fermentation range long settling time - six weeks There's good news, though. That strain should be able ...


9

Green apple flavor is called Acetaldehyde. It's one of the off-flavors that can dissipate over time, though it can be caused from a bacteria that won't go away. I would certainly wait awhile to see if the flavor dissipates. (Sources here)


9

You will need to add the right amount of priming sugar to carbonate the beer in the bottles. There are lots of online priming sugar calculators. In theory, you could bottle the beer before fermentation had completed, and let the remaining sugars carbonate the beer, but this would be very hard to do right. If you bottle with too much residual sugar, your ...


8

On my first batch I had the following issue: knowing very little about brewing and even more about what "fermentable sugars" are, I primed used raw cane sugar I had first burned into caramel, for some extra taste. The result, of course, was a beer with almost no alcohol. I discussed this with more experienced home brewers and what they advised me was the ...


8

There is only one real answer, absent any off smells or flavors and that's too many fermentables. Infections can cause gushers too, but there would be other signs. You are either adding too much priming sugar (corn sugar, DME, what have you) or you are not letting your beers reach terminal gravity, which is the point when they go dormant due to lack of ...


8

Yeast work better at warmer temps, and at this point you want the yeast to ferment the priming and carb your beer. That means you should keep the beer around 70-75°F (21-24°C) while you're trying to carb it. Once it's carbed, putting it in the fridge will not only aid the dissolution of CO2 into the beer, but will also retard staling. At this point, your ...


8

The yeast is dormant, not likely dead. Leave them in a warm place for a couple weeks or so and they should be fine.


7

Where to get the yeast is answered in your other question. The strain doesn't much matter unless its a huge beer and is exceeding the alcohol tolerance of a neutral strain like S-05. Generally I like to use the yeast I fermented with, by keeping some from the starter or some from the trub in the primary for bottling. I add it to the bottom of the bottling ...


7

The only beers I ever add yeast to for bottle conditioning are those big beers that sit for more than two months in secondary. The reasons are as you stated, tired yeast and the issue of not having enough yeast in suspension. I have crash-cooled a couple of younger ales, and not had any issues in bottle carbonation. I would be interested if anyone else had ...


7

This is one of the reasons I'm glad I keg my beer now. I had this happen a bunch of times when I used to bottle. From what I've always heard, it is most likely due to either a.) Too much priming sugar, or b.) Too many fermentable sugars left--in other words, fermentation wasn't complete. Another cause could be bacterial infection, but my sanitation was ...


7

74-78F is on the warm side, so you'll want to reduce time spent at that temperature to a minimum to reduce the chance of staling reactions from affecting the beer. On the plus side, the high temperature means the yeast won't need more than 3 days to ferment the priming sugars and clean up, after which you can then chill the bottles for a few days to allow ...


7

One of three things: Incomplete fermentation prior to bottling... If the beer wasn't completely done before bottling residual sugar (plus priming sugar) is over carbonating the beer. Too much priming sugar. Re-examine how much you used. Consider that if the beer was significantly cool prior to bottling that a fair amount of CO2 would have been already ...


6

A time test is your best bet. Bottle carbonation should be pretty mechanical unless you're experimenting with conditioning yeasts. If you're not doing anything fancy with the carbonation, it should be safe to assume that your beer is done carbonating after two weeks.


6

The beer is too cold right now especially with the higher than normal alcohol of a Tripel. The high OG also suggests the yeast might just be totally worn out, and they might not me up to the task. More yeast at bottling would have been appropriate. Just get them up to room temp for a week or so and see what happens. 70F-ish would be a good place to start. ...


6

I have done the same, resulting in a couple of cracked bottles from the pressure a couple of weeks after bottling. I loosened the caps (just barely enough to release the pressure), let them sit for a few minutes and then resealed the caps. I did this twice over a couple of weeks. This is possibly a bit dodgy in terms of sanitisation, but I had no issues ...


6

Here are some things I've learned over the two or three years of bottling: Use a checklist for the whole day, (clean, sanitize bottles, sanitize caps, prime, etc...) Double check the amount of sugar you're using to prime If available, use a workbench so you can stand comfortably Ensure your beer is high enough above your workspace so it siphons nicely Have ...


6

I'm having a hard time seeing how overfilling would cause a bottle bomb. Usually you're talking maybe a half-oz or an oz of difference between under- and over- filled. And over-filling wouldn't cause that much extra pressure. If you have one bottle bomb, you should expect the whole batch to be at risk. Moreover, just waiting for the "remaining week" of ...


6

The yeast settling out of the beer over time is a big help in clarifying the beer. If you leave them sitting on their side the yeast will settle there such that when you upright them in your fridge the some of the yeast will re-suspend and the beer will be cloudy. This adds a yeasty taste and also acts like a laxative. If you must store horizontally it ...


5

The answer is similar to the one in this post, but the short answer is that your safest bet is force-carbonating. The problem with bottle conditioning is that you've already killed most of your yeast, and even if you were to successfully repitch, there's really no good way to "turn off" fermentation when you reach your target carbonation. There are also ...


5

It's hard to say since growlers can be made very strongly and more thinly for just carrying final product from a keg to several thirsty mouths. Most growlers with straight sides are not designed to hold the pressure of natural carbonation - especially if they have suffered some wear and shocks over time. I've had one explode on me with just beer in it, and ...


5

If you have them available, I like to bottle 2-3 into the plastic P.E.T. bottles. That way you can just give them a squeeze after a week or so to see if they have carbonated fully. Not a necessary step, but it will save you from opening un-carbed bottles down the road.


5

Depending on the temperature at which you're storing it, it should be fully carbonated in 0 to 10 days. The best way to determine this is to open one up and try it and see if it's carbonated yet. If it's not yet, then give it a couple more days. Most wheat beers are not really meant for aging, so it should be pleasant/drinkable as soon as it is ...


5

You can pop one open now, and it's a good learning experience to keep drinking your beer regularly so that you can see how it develops. I know, tough life! And you'll probably find like I do that the beer is at it's peak when there's one or two bottles left. 8 days may not be enough time for all the CO2 in the headspace to dissolve back into the beer, so ...



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