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5

It does sound like your priming sugar wasn't mixed very well. That said, if the flat bottles are sweet to the taste there's something else afoot. When I bottle I usually mix a cup of water with 3/4 cup of corn sugar and stick it in the microwave for a couple minutes to boil it. I then let it cool for a while before pouring the solution into the bottom of ...


5

I personally would not open all the bottles. But I would: If you have the space I would get them into the fridge ASAP. This will slow the yeast down so you wont get much more pressure than you have now. I would also plan to drink them soon. Time to throw a home brew party! Be careful opening them as they will likely foam up and out of the bottle. Open the ...


4

Yes, there is a potential risk of bottle bombs, as with any incomplete ferment. The residual fermentables can be fermented by the remaining yeast in the bottle along with the priming sugar and produce more CO2 than intended. Ideally you should cold crash only after you are sure primary is complete. Many brewers simply leave the beer in primary for at least 2 ...


4

One week is Usually enough time to finish carbonating, however I've found that you get much better results if you wait at least two weeks. Bottle bombs are typically the result of one of three things Incomplete Fermentation Infection Too much bottling sugar If you made sure fermentation was complete, had no signs of infection and made sure you used the ...


2

These are very thick bottles. While I wouldn't let them pressurize forever, if you keep them cold, wear leather work gloves, and bring them outside in a bucket of ice water, you should be able to open them safely (and messily). I also recommend using safety glasses. For safety (and cleanliness) reasons, I wouldn't try to save them. You might be ok if you ...


1

As Thomas answered, safety is paramount right now. Glass shrapnel is a serious reality, and you don't want that in your eyes, hands, face, anywhere. Wear gloves, wear glasses, I'd even recommend a jacket/sweater when venting to keep shrapnel out of your arms/torso. Keep your beer as cold as possible to slow down fermentation. Store them away from ...


1

It is possible that you reacted too quickly during your first batch. From what I understand, there is a point during the carbonation process were the carbon that is created can build in the airspace at the top of the bottle before the beer absorbs it. This could explain the amount of carbon released when you cracked the cap and the lack of carbon once you ...


1

The act of racking will cause your beer to give up some of its dissovled CO2. This is often mis interpreted as activity because the airlock bubbles. Also if the beer warms up at all more dissolved CO2 will come out and be perceived as bubbles. Your beer is likely done and was done before the transfer. The only way to know for sure is with a hydrometer and ...


1

The only way to be sure that fermentation has stopped is with the help of a hydrometer. The gravity should be close to the expected terminal gravity (the recipe will tell you this), and should be stable over three or four days. Take a gravity reading today. Take another reading three days from now. If the gravity is low and has not changed, bottle the beer. ...


1

First.. you need to know why you these are bottle bombs. This probably happened because of one of three reasons. Early bottling before fermenation is finished Infection.. something has gone South with the recipe. Overpriming You can tell is the fermentation kicked back up by checking the suspected final gravity, to what the current specific gravity is. ...


1

I would open another one from the same batch, and if it's a gusher, then I would conclude that action is necessary for all bottles: Cold crash them in the fridge overnight. Gently/carefully loosen (don't remove) each cap. It will foam up and gush for a while. Re-crimp the cap. You may find that after a few days, the bottles are still gushers when ...



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