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My advice is to team up with a friend/parent who loves beer and decide to go for an easy recipe (beer kit). Take baby steps and have fun. My first two batches were extracts, but then we decided to step up and go whole grain (Brew in a bag) and a whole new world opened.


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As mentioned, How to Brew by John Palmer is a great book that teaches you the basics, but also allows you to dig into some of the details & more technical aspects of brewing. But don't just read. Listen to The Jamil Show, Brew Strong, Basic Brewing Radio podcasts. They provide a wealth of information.


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I recommend reading just enough to learn to brew your first few batches instead of trying to take in all the information at once. And as questions come up while brewing, write them down and devote a great deal of time to researching and answering those questions. As you progress into brewing the application of that knowledge will lead to more questions as ...


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John Palmer's book "How to Brew" is an excellent place to start and earlier versions are on line for free. It covers all the bases of brewing with quite a bit of technical information. I use this book as a reference tool all the time. If you want to get into the nuts and bolts of the individual components of brewing try the Brewing Element Series from ...


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there are many good books out there. but it comes down to your intelligence level. my buddy is an idiot. and couldn't understand "The Joy of home brewing" by charlie papazian. so i picked up the nearest thing to a coloring book for him. home brewing for dummies. another great set of books is "yeast", "malt", "hops", "water" but you biggest resource is ...



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