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17

John Palmer's "How to Brew" is one of the most recommended books for anyone starting out with brewing. He goes over the process, the ingredients, and everything else you need to know to start out. It's available online for free, or for about $15 on Amazon.


14

I found How to Brew to be a very helpful book along with The Complete Joy of Homebrewing. I feel like it complimented Papazian's book well, and in some cases was a bit easier to read, or filled in any lingering questions I had. In the end everyone seems to go with Papazian's, but I think How to Brew was an easier read.


11

The Complete Joy of Home Brewing


7

The Complete Joy of Home Brewing by Charlie Papazian


5

Designing Great Beers has been the most helpful to me. It's also the most dog-eared and mangled of all of my brewing books, because I keep coming back to it for reference of one sort or another. Probably the two biggest things I got out of the first part of the book are the explanation of the chemical compounds in the hops, and the bitterness to gravity ...


5

Without doubt, How To Brew, by John Palmer has been the biggest help to me in starting brewing. It is easy to start off with and then intriduces more complexity. A book I constantly go back to.


4

The Brewmasters Bible. I bought this book when I started out about 5 years ago. It was easy to follow then, having never brewed before, and I feel there is still a lot I can learn from the book now. I don't have any other books to compare this too, but it served as an excellent starting point for me and I still find it to be a good reference.


4

Most of the heavy duty brewing chemistry books I know of are really aimed at commercial brewers and may be more or less relevant to homebrewers. That said, look for "Principles of Brewing Science" by George Fix, "New Brewing Lager Beer" by Greg Noonan, "Brewing Science and Practice" by Briggs, and books by Narziss or de Clerck. Pretty heavy duty science! ...


3

A good book on English style beer is Amber, Gold & Black. It is a fairly comprehensive history of beer in Britain. I have taken a step further back to beyond the use of hops and just picked up Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers. This goes into more detail and includes the folkloric backgrounds of the individual ingredients. For Belgian beers, pick up ...


3

Brewing Classic Styles is a recipe book, but you can learn how to formulate your own recipes by analyzing what Jamil did. I often use it as a starting point in designing my own recipes. I'd say the key is not to go to any one book. Look at several and kind of "average" their recommendations. Add in your own knowledge and experience with what various ...


3

I am a big fan of Dave Miller's Homebrewing Guide. Had it since my first batch and still refer to it frequently.


2

A great book for recipe design: Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels


2

Dave Millers Homebrewing Guide - Dave Miller ISBN: 0882669052


2

The Brewmaster's Bible by Stephen Snyder ISBN: 0-06-095216-4


2

Charlie Papazian also wrote "The Homebrewers' Companion", which fills in the gaps of "The Complete Joy of Homebrewing". Awesome author.


2

If DGB has an entry about the style I'm interested in, I'll read it. But there are a lot of styles that it misses. As others have said, the first half of DGB is still solid. Brewing Classic Styles covers all the BJCP styles and gives a decent introduction & recipe for each. It's also more recent than DGB. So that's a book I'll always use when working on ...


2

The Complete Joy of Homebrewing by Charles Papazian seems to be a perennial favorite that is more colloquially written. How to Brew: Everything You Need To Know To Brew Beer Right The First Time by John J. Palmer is the cautious beginners guide. The Complete Handbook of Home Brewing by David Miller is a classic guide Obviously everyone will have a ...


2

Brew Your Own (byo.com) has some great articles and resources, like hop charts, grain charts, etc.


2

There's Brau Kaiser's wiki and the Home Brewing Wiki, which are both large and detailed, though maybe not as easy to use as Palmer's book.


2

Radical Brewing by randy Mosher might be a good choice. He covers a lot of ground, so he doesn't ever spend more than a few pages on any given topic (malting, hops, etc), but he does a great job of covering the basics of pretty much all aspects of brewing. He even has some chapters on creating an automated home brewery and malting at home, I think.


2

Also, don't forget "Yeast" by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff! Great practical guide for homebrewers, but they also go into some light organic chemistry of yeast cell health, behavior, reproduction/budding, etc.


1

Errata imply that the author and/or the publisher have accepted the criticism as valid error in the book. I don't think you're going to find that's the case, partially because the book has been out of print for a long time, and the author has passed away. You could always contact Kristi Switzer and ask her directly. On a side note, can you cite any ...


1

You are almost exactly describing Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels. This book has two parts. The first part goes into the science of malt, hops, water, etc. The second part describes all the classic styles, going into history, technical parameters, and ingredients that have won NHC competitions. The history is always very well researched (he cites ...


1

I am not sure where you are located, but there was a book published in the UK in 1990 called "The Historical Companion to House-Brewing" There is a synopsis of the book on a more recent reprint. I paraphrase from the inner cover blurb... "The book contains a wealth of detailed historical information on European beers, with recipes from the 15th to 19th ...


1

Books are great places to start. But realistically, I have found that my recipe formulation never really got any better until I started to brew rather than read. I don't mean that in a facetious way. I brewed my Oatmeal stout about 7 different ways until I really understood how each ingredient created the beer the way I wanted to taste it. Books are ...


1

The first book I read on winemaking was The Way to Make Wine which was pretty informative and easy to read that goes through the entire process. The author writes specifically about making grape wines but the process generally applies to fruit/country wines as well. It must have been decent since before reading it I had never made wine and now completely I'm ...


1

Well we don't seem to have a lot of wine makers yet reading. Or maybe wine makers can't read....interesting. Anyway, this book is one that several of my wine making friends recommend. Home Winemaking: Step by Step


1

Well, most of the ones I would suggest are already here (and I did upvote them) - so I'll throw out one that hasn't been mentioned yet: Extreme Brewing: An Enthusiast's Guide to Brewing Craft Beer at Home by Sam Calagione (of Dogfish Head, but I didn't need to tell ya that, right? lol) Some may say this isn't a book for beginners, but I would disagree. It ...


1

Designing Great Beers- Ray Daniels EDIT: This really isn't a great beginner book. But it IS the book to get after you read The Complete Joy and How to Brew.



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