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9

It's no problem for the foam to loose the hot break, since that's made up of denatured (coagulated) proteins. Once the proteins have denatured they don't contribute to the head of the beer - they're insoluble and just fall out and sit at the bottom of the fermentor or keg. (This is covered in the podcast - Jon mentions not boiling the wort too hard to avoid ...


7

Fermcap-S is a silicone (Dimethylpolysiloxane) based emulsion that works by breaking surface tension. It has no effect on the finished product if used in the boil at designated dosage. If used in the fermenter, I have read that it will increase residual bitterness by ~10%. This is likely due to the compound binding to the yeast cells before the dissolved ...


5

The FDA has recently decided that Fermcap S should be filtered before you drink your beer. Fortunately, there's Fermcap AT which is fine to use without filtering. Here's some info from Birko, which makes a product very much like Fermcap.. "Brewers should not use silicone-containing antifoam for unfiltered beers. The FDA allows active silicone to be ...


5

In the fourth & final Brew Strong episode on high gravity brewing, Jamil, John, and Tasty touched briefly on using pre-1981 pennies in the boil to help provide minerals (Copper, Zinc) to the yeast to help them survive the stress of a big fermentation. (They mention it around the 30:00 mark.)


3

The effect that you are describing is that of adding a nucleation point (or site) to the kettle, as you said. A nucleation point provides a place for bubbles to form and release and will help to prevent boilovers. That being said, though, a penny (or a few pennies) will not have enough surface area to help a batch that large. At places that sell cooking ...


3

I've used FermCap in the last couple of batches. Seems to work great for preventing that initial boilover. It still gets foamy, but the foam dissipates much more quickly. Excellent in starters on the stove top as well. No noticeable effect in the finished beer. No problems with head retention, etc.


2

I keep a very close eye on the foam level during the first 10 minutes of the boil and am very ready to kill the heat if need be. Recently I've been boiling with my pot about 2" from the rim at the start of the boil and haven't boiled over... yet. Brewing on a gas range (as opposed to electric) really provides for a lot of control over the heat input. With ...


1

Fermcap S is far and away the best solution. Use as directed during the boil. You can also use it in the fermenter to prevent a large krausen from overwhelming your airlock, but you will need to adjust your IBU's as it will reduce hop utilization during fermentation. You can also add a drop or two to your starters to prevent boil overs when preparing them.


1

In my first few batches I quickly learned that something doesn't go exactly right in almost every batch. Should be fine unless you have reason to believe you may have poisoned the beer. In my few short years homebrewing, I have yet to toss a batch or make one that is totally undrinkable. You've learned two important lessons. 1. Be careful with your ...


1

Since the hydrometer only broke in the sanitizing bucket, you're almost certainly fine. Boiling over, from my understanding, is going to happen to everyone from time to time. As far as the hydrometer, if you didn't get an OG calculation, you can always go to beercalculus.com and enter the recipe you used. It will give you an approximate OG based on your ...



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