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4

Bitterness is not linear throughout the boil, so you cannot assume that it will be twice as bitter after 60 minutes vs. 30 minutes. I'm also not sure that you're going to get a great sense of the bitterness in the partially-boiled wort vs. the finished beer, but I don't have a really compelling argument as to why not. But I'm not understanding something ...


1

All hops contribute both aroma and bitterness in varying degrees. Grouping them into 4 hard categories is somewhat arbitrary. In general they are grouped as aroma vs bitterness, but if you wanted to you could simply use more "aroma hops" early in your boil and still end up more bitterness (and vice versa).


0

This chart shows the different components of a large variety of different hop types: (Linked file for high resolution) I found the chart on this blog post about hops but actually I originally saw it at the London Beer Lab, who do an awesome course on brewing (we were the audience for their prototype course, which was pretty cool). Basically, above the ...


0

For a partial mash (malt extract plus specialty grains), do not boil the grains. Put them in a large mesh/muslin bag and steep them in your brewpot at 155f for 30-45 minutes before adding your hops or extract. Boiling the grains would release harsh tannic flavors that you don't want.


2

To expand from Chris Dargis's comments, specialty grains are called that because they contribute more flavor than they do fermentable sugars. In extract and partial mash brewing (what you're looking at doing), the fermentable sugars come mostly from your extract, where the specialty grains supplement the beer by contributing other characteristics such as ...


-1

Specialty grains need to be soaked in water at an optimal temperature for alpha amylase activity - 150-160F. Typically, 30 minutes is enough time for full flavor and sugar extraction. However, with specialty grains only, you aren't looking to get many fermentable sugars from the grains - only wort color and flavor. If you steep them in water hotter than ...


1

Hulled barley is about 2% fat by weight. That's almost certainly why we see a slight oil-slick on the wort before it boils. I'm not sure why you don't see it when you're boiling inside. It could be like you say,that the rapid speed of the outdoor boil has something to do with it. Or it could be that the light is brighter outside, showing the oil more ...


2

Sounds normal to me. When I was first reading up about BIAB, it was mentioned in several places that this is an issue. Absorbing 3/4 of 5 gallons seems like a bit much, but it will absorb some (I've heard about a quart per pound?). It probably didn't absorb that much, as the wort would drain out of the bag if you could hold it over the pot for 10-20 minutes. ...


1

"Bittering hops" are those with high alpha acids that contribute more IBUs than one with less alpha acids. But a bittering hop that is not boiled for long (or added post-boil) will not contribute to high IBUs or bitterness, just aroma and flavor. You can use a so-called bittering hop for aroma and flavor and vice-versa. There may be debate on whether that ...


5

A difference of a few degrees (208 vs 212) is not very significant from an isomerization perspective. Studies have shown that isomerization continues to occur in whirlpools at or below 200 degrees. Things that could have affected utilization: Wort strength - higher gravities will lower utilization You mentioned extra pre-boil volume - as long as you hit ...



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