Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

There is an infection risk any time you open up your fermenter and especially when you throw stuff into it. If you dry hop at the right time you reduce that risk. The alcohol built up protects against infection The hops already in the beer act as a preservative The pH is unfriendly to new growth Most of the easy to eat sugars are already consumed For ...


15

You want to boil with your lid off. Part of the process of boiling is to remove dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which is a sulfur compound off flavor that tastes like cooked corn. DMS is formed by heating the wort. If you leave the lid on the kettle DMS won't evaporate with the steam and you'll have more of the flavor in your beer. You might also run the risk of ...


12

Boiling is a fairly poorly understood process. That being said here is what I know. Partial-wort Boil Ups You probably already have all the necessary equipment Small footprint Easy to manage You can use your kettle for other things Downs Hop utilization suffers, meaning you must use more hops to get the same level of bitterness There is a limit to ...


11

When I did extract I tended to just go from the tap right into the fermentor with the wort. I can't say that I ever had a bad batch because of it. But it certainly can happen. If you have a way to boil water for 15 minutes, then store it in a sanitary and sealed contain while it cools back down to a useable temperature...that is the safer way to go. If ...


10

The reason for the prolonged boil is to drive off the volatile chemical DMS (Dimethyl Sulfide). DMS give beer that cooked corn flavor and aroma. DMS is created as the wort increases above 140F from the precursor molecule SMM(S-methyl-methionine). All base malts have some SMM, but during the kilning process post malting it is driven off. However Pilsner ...


9

When I did extract, we always used a jug spring water to top off the extra few gallons. You can sanitize the bottle mouth with some StarSan or other sanitizing solution, and then just pour the bottle in. You can also keep the jug in the fridge prior to use to cool your wort when you add it. This way you avoid boiling anything, but are still pretty safe from ...


9

This technique of holding back the extract until the end of the boil is a fairly new concept that's caught on in the last few years. Here's some reasons why its a good idea in general: Faster time from the start of the boil to the 1st hop addition Less chance of a boil over Less caramalization/Mailiard reactions of the extract (leading to lighter colored ...


9

There's a few consequences, none of them are game over's. First off, don't leave your lid on the kettle when you boil. This will effect your evaporation rate and you'll likely not hit your Original Gravity as you would expect. Also, Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a sulfur compound which leaves a taste of cooked or cream corn in your beer (a signature off ...


8

Most "Chocolate" stouts get their flavor from a combination of roasted malts - chocolate malt, pale chocolate malt or coffee malt. There are delicious exceptions, like Young's Double Chocolate Stout. Nibs are dehusked, roasted cacao seeds. They are high in fat (relatively tasteless cocoa butter), which does not add much flavor and which might cause problems ...


8

Put in the volume of the water you're boiling. Hopville knows how to handle partial boils. As for your second question, I think that's still up for debate. Beer bitterness and hop utilization is not fully understood. The original theory was that the high concentration of sugar in a partial boil (or any high-gravity boil) would prevent the alpha acids from ...


8

Usually the pellets will dissolve during boil and settle down to the bottom of your kettle when you cool your wort. Then, when transferring to the fermentor you can just leave them behind (easier to do with a siphon). Or Use a hop bag - put the pellets on the bag, when you are done with the boil simply pull the bag out.


8

There are several things to consider here. Certainly slowing down your boil will change your rate of evaporation, but that's only a problem if you're having a hard time hitting your target volumes. The main consideration is your bitterness contribution from hops. Alpha acid isomerization, like most chemical reactions, is temperature dependent. It happens at ...


8

The hop pellets are not supposed to dissolve into your wort. Rather, the boiling isomerizes the alpha acids in the hops (and the isomerized alpha acids will dissolve into the wort), giving the wort its intended bitterness. However, it is totally normal to get an "oil slick", film or foam of hops on top of the boiling wort. Hops have three purposes: ...


7

It means putting an addition of hops at flameout, or when you turn off the kettle. Those late addition hops can add hop aroma and some nice flavor. I wouldn't take your hops out when the boil is done for hoppy beers. Leaving those hops in while the wort cools can give you more of that aroma that some styles call for. Jamil Zainasheff has some tips for Hop ...


7

I have half a blog post in my head about the six -ations of the boil. Here's a sample. Also listen to this episode of Brew Strong for a lot of good information. In general, shoot for an 8 — 12% evaporation rate. Evaporation The most obvious one. The more water you drive off, the more concentrated your wort will turn out. This has the effect of ...


7

Commercial micro-brewers can bring 10 barrels (2880 pints) to the boil in 30 - 45 mins using a gas jet of flame in a pipe that passes through the kettle - can't remember the technical name for it. What they do do, though, is recirculate the wort whilst they heat. This will keep it on the move and prevent hot spots/scorching/caramelising and any other ...


7

I think the factor isn't that you want sterile wort, but sanitized wort. You may not get sterile wort from boiling, but that isn't a problem. The wort is surrounded by barely sanitary air, so it's going to be contaminated to some degree from the get go. The key point is that the massive yeast population (>100bn cells for a 5 gallon batch) scavenge dissolved ...


6

The main problem that I ran in to with my partial boils was that the wort caramelized because I was using a pot that didn't evenly distribute the heat well enough. And since there was less water than a full boil, the sugar concentration was higher. So, I had hot spots on the bottom of the pot that would burn the sugar in my wort. Also the higher the gravity ...


6

Doing a full-wort boil (all 5 gallons) offers a few technical advantages over partial-wort boils. There are a number of reactions that depend on the concentration of wort. First, the wort-darkening reactions are more pronounced at a smaller volume meaning your wort will come out a little darker than you expect. Second and more importantly, the rate of hop ...


6

Typically, the long boil is intended to increase melanoidin formation ("kettle carmelization") and decrease DMS in wort with a lot of pilsener malt. The former appears to be the case, here: "While you could go with a shorter boil, the 90 minute boil enhances the blood-red color. It also adds a touch more melanoidin and caramel notes." It's ...


6

To augment STW's answer, a Maillard reaction is a browning chemical reaction between an amino acid and a sugar. Heat encourages these reactions. Carmelization is an example of a Maillard reaction, although there are others. These reactions are responsible for the flavor of the crust of bread, as well as most nutty, caramel, and toffee notes in beer. ...


6

You've covered the main reasons that I could think of off the top of my head, ie, pasteurisation, flavour formation and isomerisation of hops. A quick search reminded me of the other two, which is that it drives off unwanted volatile compounds (eg, SMM - the precursor to DMS) and it causes proteins and polyphenols/tannins to bind and precipitate out in the ...


6

No, you don't have to boil the full volume in AG brewing. I only had a 7 gal. pot when I started AG so I's boil about 5 gal. down to 3.5-4, then add top off water. Boiling less will reduce your efficieny because you don't collect as much wort. You need to use more grain to make a higher gravity wort at less volume, so you can top off afterward. That was ...


6

According to Brewkaiser, the ideal boil pH (room temp sample pre boil) should be around 5.2-5.4. Much lower than that, and you'll reduce hop utilitilization, but much higher and the hop utiliziation increases, but the bitterness is harsher. (The same process that causes tannin extraction at higher pH in the mash is at play in the boil also.) A higher pH in ...


6

You'll be fine, as long as there isn't some obvious source contaminating the snow - like if it's actually falling off of a tree or roof and not coming directly from the clouds. Snow is basically freeze distilled so it's pretty clean. I suppose if it's coming down very hard and several inches of snow fall in there it could it could dilute it a little bit, ...


5

First wort hopping is the practice of adding hops to kettle when you take first runnings from the mash tun. As the kettle fills you heat the wort to boiling. The "boil hops" are in the kettle before the boil begins and steep in the warm wort. The best way to carry this over to extract brewing would be to add your first hops to the kettle when the wort ...


5

For most things I just use my trusty stick, otherwise known as a thin dowel from the hardware store. Pour one gallon into your pot, stand stick in pot, note water line, and mark with a sharpie or other implement. The curvature of a pot can affect the height of each tick mark, so I usually experimentally measure a few more gallons until I'm at the straight ...


5

Taylor's partial boil answer is a good one, particularly if you are limited to the typical small-sized electric stove found in most apartments. Another issue with boiling wort in an apartment is excessive humidity, and more problematic, the smell drifting into your neighbor's loft. But if you want to do a full boil, there is an alternative: go outside! ...


5

In the fourth & final Brew Strong episode on high gravity brewing, Jamil, John, and Tasty touched briefly on using pre-1981 pennies in the boil to help provide minerals (Copper, Zinc) to the yeast to help them survive the stress of a big fermentation. (They mention it around the 30:00 mark.)


5

I'm assuming that your recipe is all-grain from some of your previous questions, but if it is an extract recipe you probably don't need to worry since most of the DMS boiled off. A little over a month ago I made a hefe (from extract) and only had a 15 minute boil time. Neither me, nor anyone who has tasted it can detect any DMS. If it's all-grain, what ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible