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6

A chipped aluminum pot will function, but if I just bought it and haven't used it yet I would definitely return it and demand that Amazon pay the shipping. In the mean time, look into Sam's Club if you know someone with a membership, I got a 24 quart for $30 there.


5

Hop bags are the answer. I use hop bags. You can use multiple hop bags for your multiple hop additions. I tie them to the handle of the brew kettle so they don't come open during the boil. You may want to up the hop quantities a touch (10%?) because you get slightly lower utilization in hop bags. When it's time for racking, chill the wort and then pull the ...


5

I used to do the same thing but recently have found these bags http://www.northernbrewer.com/default/large-straining-bag-18-3-4-x-19.html I get the one that is big enough to fit in the bucket and stretch it over the top. I then simply pour the whole boil kettle into the bucket and lift the bag out. The mesh on these is finer than the hop sacks I have been ...


3

I wouldn't go any hotter than a 4500 watt element for a 15 gallon brew kettle. While the temptation to put a bigger element in to speed up the process is great, consider that once the liquid achieves boil, you will end up with a very localized 'hot spot' right on the element that causes the liquid to boil VIGOROUSLY. That locally hard boil will cause the ...


3

You can always add one later. I have them on all my kettles and they're helpful, but not a necessity for basic brewing. I'd say the biggest thing mine do for me is allow me to use a pump for recirculated chilling. But you can always go on stages, adding a valve (the weldless kits work great) and pump, etc. as need and finances dictate.


3

As far as I can see it would not matter if the threads were exposed, or if you had teflon tape (as long as it does not give of anything that can damage the beer) when it comes to sanitary issues since you, hopefully, clean your equipment before using it. Since this part will also be inside the brew it will be in a boiling liquid for an hour or two. If you ...


2

I use a 5500W reliance element for boiling 56L wort (ca. 15 gallons) on about 80% duty which gives a vigorous boil. This is the typical pre-boil volume for hitting 10 gallons packaged beer. The element uses a 1" NPS thread (although check carefully - there are also elements with 1-3/8" thread.) You can get 1" NPS locknuts at bargainfittings.com. There's a ...


2

I think this will work. I've used a stainless scrubby to build a hopback, where the main point was to filter out the hops, keeping them in the container. You may want to experiment with putting the scrubby around the braid rather than inside it, since it may be too tightly packed if put inside, preventing flow.


2

You can buy off the shelf equipment that can do all of this. I have two plastic boilers that I got from the local homebrew shop, both have thermistors on the back to control the boil. A friend has got a fancier non-plastic electric boiler/mash tun, which he got from the same place. Have a look at The Malt Miller's equipment page, there is everything on there ...


2

I would suggest that you make a hop spider, I had this problem when making beers with lots of hops until I stumbled into a discussion on homebrewtalk. http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=hop+spider After building on I never had this problem again, it was cheap (less than $15)..


2

I sometimes use a set up similar to your. After I whirlpool, I'll put my racking can in, but I hold it so its not all the way down sitting in the trub/hot mix. I hold it about half way. As I siphon I continuously lower the racking cane, being careful as I get closer to the bottom to not get into the junk. The other thing I do is I plan for a half to one ...


2

A chipped aluminum pot will function the same as a non-chipped aluminum pot. Be sure to keep it as clean as possible. Since you are boiling whatever touches the chip, it really won't matter a whole lot. Return it if you are super worried about it. Better yet, get a stainless steel pot.


2

The formula to determine wattage is as follows: Gallons * Temp Rise (F) ------------------------------------ * 1000 = Watts Required 372 * heat up time (hours) So, for a homebrew example of 7 gallons of wort at the beginning of your boil, and desiring to reach boil in 15 minutes, and assuming your wort temperature before boil is 150 degrees F after sparge ...


2

I would be concerned about their durability. They are likely not stainless steel under the finish so any exposed metal will rust. If you are planning on drilling holes for spigots, sight glasses, etc., that will definitely be a problem. Also, mash tuns and boils kettles take a beating with exposure to somewhat acidic wort and harsh cleaners. I assume you ...


2

I would not count on those being food grade. I recommend you look into 55 gal. SS barrels.


2

The problem might be a thermocouple this is a hardwired switch that will cut the element out if the temp goes to high. this is a additional safety and is normally wired in series with the thermostat that normally switches of the element when it gets to the set temperature. this switch might be faulty, your local electrician might be able to fix it or maybe ...


2

The main advantage with SS is that it is quite inert - had you had a stainless kettle, the corrosion problem you experienced with the immersion chiller wouldn't have happened. Since it's happened once, it's quite likely to happen again, meaning you'd end up buying 2 new aluminum kettles (for a total of 3.) So in the long run stainless will work out ...


2

Electro-etching works with all metals, including Aluminum. Often, the makeup of the electrolyte is changed up to give better or worse results with different metals. In this case, you don't actually need an acid as per the above - just a salt water solution works fine for aluminum. However, please make sure to do this in a well ventilated area as ...


1

I think it will be too small. The ROT is that you want a pot at least 50% bigger than your batch size.


1

Yes, it has been done many times.


1

I think you would have to make that adapter yourself. Water heater threads are usually NPS or standard threads where your SS fittings are NPT Pipe threads. Your best bet is to weld the correct bung or adapter into the keg side. I have seen 120V 1400+W immersion heaters that use o-ring style seals but will not heat as well as 220v elements. Another choice ...



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