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6

A chipped aluminum pot will function, but if I just bought it and haven't used it yet I would definitely return it and demand that Amazon pay the shipping. In the mean time, look into Sam's Club if you know someone with a membership, I got a 24 quart for $30 there.


5

Hop bags are the answer. I use hop bags. You can use multiple hop bags for your multiple hop additions. I tie them to the handle of the brew kettle so they don't come open during the boil. You may want to up the hop quantities a touch (10%?) because you get slightly lower utilization in hop bags. When it's time for racking, chill the wort and then pull the ...


5

I used to do the same thing but recently have found these bags http://www.northernbrewer.com/default/large-straining-bag-18-3-4-x-19.html I get the one that is big enough to fit in the bucket and stretch it over the top. I then simply pour the whole boil kettle into the bucket and lift the bag out. The mesh on these is finer than the hop sacks I have been ...


4

I regularly do 10gl batches in a 15.5gl keggle. You will definitely need to attend to the kettle while bringing it up to a boil to prevent boil-overs, but it's certainly possible. Also, foam-control agents (Fermcap-S, simethicone/baby gas drops) will help, but are not fool-proof prevention. One thing to note: you need a lot fewer BTUs to maintain a boil ...


4

The boil is important for achieving certain beneficial changes in the chemistry of the wort that include the dropping out of haze creating proteins. So don’t forego the boil, even if it’s only a 6-liter partial boil. The main issue with boiling a small quantity of wort is that you'll get caramelization a lot sooner than if you were to boil the extract in a ...


3

There are two stages you are "loosing" water, and each have different mechanism: Mash and sparge Boil Let's talk them one at a time. Mash & Sparge loses There are two reasons for that. First is stuck filtering. If your malt is dripping wet, but nothing comes from the filter, this is the case. See Preventing a Stuck Sparge for details how to deal ...


3

Many people use propane turkey fryer setups, consisting of a large propane burner and kettle. The kettle is usually around 6.5-7 gal. so it's barely big enough for a 5 gal. batch, but it works. I won awards for beer made with one. The kettles are often AL, but don't let that throw you. It's perfectly fine and safe.


3

I wouldn't go any hotter than a 4500 watt element for a 15 gallon brew kettle. While the temptation to put a bigger element in to speed up the process is great, consider that once the liquid achieves boil, you will end up with a very localized 'hot spot' right on the element that causes the liquid to boil VIGOROUSLY. That locally hard boil will cause the ...


3

It's a can of metal. If you don't feel you can get the surface clean after the fry (perhaps because of carbonization of organic matter stuck to the surface), then that will be a problem. If you can, then it's a clean surface you will have no problems brewing with in the future. I'd say: roast away! If there's a problem, lobby to get your family to replace ...


3

You can always add one later. I have them on all my kettles and they're helpful, but not a necessity for basic brewing. I'd say the biggest thing mine do for me is allow me to use a pump for recirculated chilling. But you can always go on stages, adding a valve (the weldless kits work great) and pump, etc. as need and finances dictate.


3

As far as I can see it would not matter if the threads were exposed, or if you had teflon tape (as long as it does not give of anything that can damage the beer) when it comes to sanitary issues since you, hopefully, clean your equipment before using it. Since this part will also be inside the brew it will be in a boiling liquid for an hour or two. If you ...


3

Losses of water in the brewing process are common. There are some that are unavoidable and some that are controllable to a point. 1. Absorption by Grain: Your dry grain will absorb water at a rate of 0.96*(weight of grain). The 0.96 is a ratio, so if you use kg of grain, for every 1 kg of grain, you will lose 0.96 kg of water (~960 mL). If you use pounds, 1 ...


2

I use a 5500W reliance element for boiling 56L wort (ca. 15 gallons) on about 80% duty which gives a vigorous boil. This is the typical pre-boil volume for hitting 10 gallons packaged beer. The element uses a 1" NPS thread (although check carefully - there are also elements with 1-3/8" thread.) You can get 1" NPS locknuts at bargainfittings.com. There's a ...


2

I think this will work. I've used a stainless scrubby to build a hopback, where the main point was to filter out the hops, keeping them in the container. You may want to experiment with putting the scrubby around the braid rather than inside it, since it may be too tightly packed if put inside, preventing flow.


2

You can buy off the shelf equipment that can do all of this. I have two plastic boilers that I got from the local homebrew shop, both have thermistors on the back to control the boil. A friend has got a fancier non-plastic electric boiler/mash tun, which he got from the same place. Have a look at The Malt Miller's equipment page, there is everything on there ...


2

I would suggest that you make a hop spider, I had this problem when making beers with lots of hops until I stumbled into a discussion on homebrewtalk. http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=hop+spider After building on I never had this problem again, it was cheap (less than $15)..


2

I sometimes use a set up similar to your. After I whirlpool, I'll put my racking can in, but I hold it so its not all the way down sitting in the trub/hot mix. I hold it about half way. As I siphon I continuously lower the racking cane, being careful as I get closer to the bottom to not get into the junk. The other thing I do is I plan for a half to one ...


2

A chipped aluminum pot will function the same as a non-chipped aluminum pot. Be sure to keep it as clean as possible. Since you are boiling whatever touches the chip, it really won't matter a whole lot. Return it if you are super worried about it. Better yet, get a stainless steel pot.


2

The formula to determine wattage is as follows: Gallons * Temp Rise (F) ------------------------------------ * 1000 = Watts Required 372 * heat up time (hours) So, for a homebrew example of 7 gallons of wort at the beginning of your boil, and desiring to reach boil in 15 minutes, and assuming your wort temperature before boil is 150 degrees F after sparge ...


2

I would be concerned about their durability. They are likely not stainless steel under the finish so any exposed metal will rust. If you are planning on drilling holes for spigots, sight glasses, etc., that will definitely be a problem. Also, mash tuns and boils kettles take a beating with exposure to somewhat acidic wort and harsh cleaners. I assume you ...


2

I would not count on those being food grade. I recommend you look into 55 gal. SS barrels.


2

The problem might be a thermocouple this is a hardwired switch that will cut the element out if the temp goes to high. this is a additional safety and is normally wired in series with the thermostat that normally switches of the element when it gets to the set temperature. this switch might be faulty, your local electrician might be able to fix it or maybe ...


2

I have two very rough guesses. First, are there any points where you are boiling uncovered where you could change and cover the pot? Second, your boiler is 52l? Given how large that is I expect you're producing a lot of steam in the boiler due to its increased surface area. Try skipping the boiler, sparge back into your HLT instead of the boiler. Having ...


2

That seems low, but it's largely dependent on what's in the kit. It is probably an extract kit. If it's not completely extract and includes some specialty grains you may be in trouble. Depending on weight these will require some steeping and require about 1.25 quarts of water per pound of grains, and don't forget to leave room for the grains in the pot as ...


2

The main advantage with SS is that it is quite inert - had you had a stainless kettle, the corrosion problem you experienced with the immersion chiller wouldn't have happened. Since it's happened once, it's quite likely to happen again, meaning you'd end up buying 2 new aluminum kettles (for a total of 3.) So in the long run stainless will work out ...


2

Electro-etching works with all metals, including Aluminum. Often, the makeup of the electrolyte is changed up to give better or worse results with different metals. In this case, you don't actually need an acid as per the above - just a salt water solution works fine for aluminum. However, please make sure to do this in a well ventilated area as ...


2

I think the cleaning you gave it will be good. But if not, then at most your first beer might have a flat head from fatty deposits that will be removed by the acidic wort on your first brew. So definitely use it, you'll be fine in the long run.


1

The bottom lime is that you're nor going to get a lot of hop aroma out of a 5 minute addition, or even at flameout. I've pretty much stopped doing those additions becasue I found, as you did, that they don't do much. Try whirlpool hopping or dry hopping for the best hop aroma.


1

How are you cooling the wort? If you take too long to cool your wort after adding hops at the end of the boil, the high temperature of the wort may still allow isomerization, which would diminish the aroma.


1

What hops are you using? Some hops do not make good aroma hops at all, they are bittering only. How old are they? The older a hop, the less aroma you'll get from them. How do you store them? If they're stored without oxygen, in a freezer, they will be fresher when you use them. The less fresh hops are, the less aroma they produce. How do you ferment? ...



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