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9

The solution I use is to mark my spoon with permanent marker. I have marks for each half gallon. Works really well without messing with the kettle itself. This obviously is kettle specific, so if you are using multiple kettles you can have markings of different color to differentiate the different markings per kettle.


3

I use an aluminum yardstick, which let's you do pretty accurate measurements on multiple pots/kettles, without needing to use a marker on anything (I've had problems with marker wearing off and worry about toxicity of the ink). Put a gallon of water in your pot, measure how high it is, and write it down somewhere. Then you'll always be able calculate what ...


3

You can always add one later. I have them on all my kettles and they're helpful, but not a necessity for basic brewing. I'd say the biggest thing mine do for me is allow me to use a pump for recirculated chilling. But you can always go on stages, adding a valve (the weldless kits work great) and pump, etc. as need and finances dictate.


3

There is some experimentation going on with immersion of water heater coils for boiling, but I have no experience with that. I hear that it's fast and efficient, but I would be nervous about water + high voltage.


2

I'm a little late to this question, but I thought one solution might be to put down a layer of fiberglass fabric, the kind that is impregnated with epoxy to form fiberglass hulls and such. In its fabric form it is easy easy to lay down underneath and around the burner, non-conductive (if you have electric burners), impervious to heat, and an excellent ...


2

I think the answer to this question is that I buy a burner and do the brewing outside. Its not perfect and does require some more $, but its an imperfect world and given that I live in Florida, I can brew outside year round. I will just have to watch the forecast for rain.


2

I use a 5500W reliance element for boiling 56L wort (ca. 15 gallons) on about 80% duty which gives a vigorous boil. This is the typical pre-boil volume for hitting 10 gallons packaged beer. The element uses a 1" NPS thread (although check carefully - there are also elements with 1-3/8" thread.) You can get 1" NPS locknuts at bargainfittings.com. There's a ...


2

The problem might be a thermocouple this is a hardwired switch that will cut the element out if the temp goes to high. this is a additional safety and is normally wired in series with the thermostat that normally switches of the element when it gets to the set temperature. this switch might be faulty, your local electrician might be able to fix it or maybe ...


2

One of the things I have always liked about the home brewing hobby is that you can get started and make excellent beer without investing a lot of money in equipment, but there are many options for equipment that can be added over time. Some of those options may improve your beer, but others often just make things more convenient. IMHO, the primary ...


2

I'm in the minority here, but I just can't, for the life of me, figure out why anyone would ever bother spending so much money on a brew kettle. What do you get for the extra money? Let's break it down. 1) A built in thermometer - Here's a tip for you, water/wort boils at 212F ;) Seriously though, if you NEED a thermometer because you're monitoring the ...


2

I have aluminum HLT and BK and used a dremel to make a small mark at each gallon level. I marked with a china marker when the water was in there (adding one gallon at a time), and after I dried it out, I used the dremel. I marked in 3 columns, 120 degrees apart, so I'd be able to see at least one measurement no matter which side I was standing on. Also, I ...


2

I would be concerned about their durability. They are likely not stainless steel under the finish so any exposed metal will rust. If you are planning on drilling holes for spigots, sight glasses, etc., that will definitely be a problem. Also, mash tuns and boils kettles take a beating with exposure to somewhat acidic wort and harsh cleaners. I assume you ...


2

I would not count on those being food grade. I recommend you look into 55 gal. SS barrels.


1

Yes, it has been done many times.


1

I would say the most important thing is a well-drilled hole. Scrappy, poorly-drilled holes make it difficult to fit the component parts in and can make it possible for bacteria to collect between brews. Often you'll be hooking some kind of hose to the outside of your valve, so gravity will do the work. I think for tightness-of-seal you're right - you ...


1

One thing I did in my apartment was to get a griddle that would cover 2 burners. Put both burners on high, with the griddle on top. Put the brew kettle on the middle of the griddle. You get somewhere around 1.5 the BTUs of 1 burner (some is lost to waste heat, unless you rig up a proper way to hold that heat in, which I never really investigated).


1

Electric brewing with heat sticks. Or you can supplement your stove top with a little extra heating capacity using a heat stick. Start here with this heat stick page Listen to the April 29th 2010 Electric Brewing episode at Basic Brewing Radio.


1

I've had the same problem on our small apartment stove, and the best trick I could come up wih was to preheat water in a separate kettle while I'm doing other prep work so I can have hot water on hand rather than try to bring 3 gallons to a boil all at once.


1

Try kitchen supply stores. I bought a while ago at a Williams-Sonoma a disc that matched our cookware (and it was somewhat expensive), but I'm sure a lower-end cooking store would have a simple steel/copper/aluminum plate. If your stove is gas, they work wonderfully in the kitchen as well!


1

Aluminum is cheaper and easier to find, copper is a better conducter of heat. So I would probably go with aluminum and I would look at the Home Depot or Loews. They should have some sheets there. Then I would cut it to size and throw my pot on it the next time I brewed. Worst case, you can only find five inch wide strips, I would cut the strip into the ...



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