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10

You're experiencing a "blow-off". Often, people will replace their airlock with a "blow-off tube", usually one with the same OD as the airlock so it can fit in the same hole on the lid. The worry with continuing to use the airlock is that … especially if one of those airlocks has residual plastic across the bottom of the post that fits into the grommet on ...


9

The best is when so much pressure builds up that the airlock is shot to the ceiling and your closet is splattered in fermentation goo. Solutions: use a 6.5 gallon carboy for 5 gallon batches -and/or- use a blow-off tube (examples here)


7

Keep it in for as long as there's a large krausen (the foam on top of the beer.) You can then choose to remove it and replace with an airlock or you can leave in until the end of fermentation and you're ready to rack. If you do remove it and replace with an airlock, there is potentially a risk of contamination, but not much if you sanitize all the airlock ...


7

Aside from the mess it seems fine to me. Remove and clean the airlock. Resanitize the airlock and put it back in the lid. You just have a very good ferment. 10lbs of LME in a 5-6 gallon batch is a lot, so its not a surprise to have the aggressive ferment.


6

You essentially have four options: 1) Use a blow off tube. Advantage: Easy to do. Disadvantage: You risk losing some beer. 2) Find a bigger vessel. Advantage: No beer lost. Disadvantage: You need to find a bigger vessel. 3) Use a foam suppressor like Fermcap. Advantage: You'll lose less beer than with a blowoff. Disadvantage: Some people don't like ...


4

Nothing to worry about. The kind of mess you've had to deal with is one of the reasons I prefer to start out in the pail. :-) Relax... everything will be fine.


4

Introducing oxygen is not a concern at all at this point. That's a bogeyman that's way exaggerated. You could probably leave it without problems, but I like to remove it and clean it when that happens to me.


4

Sounds like a vigorous, but otherwise normal fermentation. Rack to secondary, if that's your process, or leave it in the carboy for another week or two before bottling. The krausen residue on the walls of the carboy won't affect the final beer. In the future you might consider using a blow-off tube instead of an airlock.


3

There is no harm on having the blow off tube. You could use it during the whole ferment If you want. As for avoiding it, the only ways are to use a bigger vessel as you said, or make less beer.


3

Could be that the warm summer temperatures are creating a more vigorous fermentation than you're used to. Aside from the problem due to blow off described above, I'd be a little worried that the temperature of the fermenting beer has gotten too high. Ale yeasts produce the cleanest tasting beer at temperatures below 65 F. Above that the yeast produces ...


3

Vigorous fermentation is good. But loosing beer is bad. As suggested, for this batch, just keep cleaning the air lock. There are some things you might try on your next batch: Purchase some "Fermcap-S" at your local homebrew store or here or here, for instance. This stuff, like magic, breaks up the foam, and does not cause significant ill effects on ...


3

Very active yeast and/or an overfull fermentor. You could also have the tube jammed too far into the fermentor. It just needs to be in far enough to not get forced out from the pressure. Some yeast just habitualy blow-off a lot, too. I had 2.5 gallons of starter wort and Wyeast 3787 in a 5 gallon carboy that blew off a little bit. Everyone I know has ...


3

I've always used a tube that was biggest enough to fit snug into the neck of the carboy with no stopper. I use a standard mix of sanitizer and a pot/bucket with enough in it sitting at the right height so that the open end of the tube is submerged. That's pretty much all you need to do. What you have in the pics is just fine. You're goal is to have some ...


2

You should be using a 6+ gallon carboy for a 5 gallon batch of beer for this reason. There needs to be enough room for the thing to kreusen up without blowing everything out.


2

In my experience, a kettle addition of Fermcap does not eliminate the need for it in the fermenter. If you need it there, you have to add more.


2

John Palmer says that Cleaning Plastics should be done with Percarbonates. A good application of elbow grease also works. :)


1

I like to use PBW (or the home made version) to clean hard surfaces like that. Dissolve in some hot water and scrub. It will remove most anything and is safe for brewing when rinsed properly. Follow up with a thorough rinsing and then use a no-rinse sanitizer to ensure it's all clean. Home made PBW recipes can be found online, but the base is Oxiclean Free ...


1

That's a question that's been debated with no definitive answer. Some say it's better to blow off the braun hefe becasue of the bitterness it might contribute. Others say it's better to use a larger fermenter so you don't lose yeast. There really is no right or wrong answer other than "try it each way and decide for yourself".


1

Yes, you're fine. No, don't xfer to a secondary...at least not yet. You probably don't need a secondary at all. A lot of brewers have found that it's unnecessary. If you decide you want to xfer, give it at least 3 weeks in primary first. There's nothing wrong with leaving it in there that long.


1

Try bottles from a different case or a different part of the case. You definitely have bottles that have priming sugar in them. I might worry that those will over carbonate. It seems like you just didn't get a good mix of the sugar into the beer. (Which I think you already know.) You'd be surprised what carbonation does for balancing the flavor profile of ...


1

Two weeks may not be sufficient time for the bottles to condition. I've had batches that took 4-6 weeks and longer. Conditioning time depends on how active the yeast are. Put the bottles in a warm, dark place and let the yeast do their work. Open one occasionally to see how they're doing. That said, if it doesn't taste any good then it's probably not worth ...


1

Good answers are already posted to answer the question. But one thing that isn't mentioned is the ways to avoid this from happening in the first place: If you brew a 5 gallon batch have your primary fermenter have at least a 6.5 gallon capacity. Thereby allowing enough headspace so that active yeast growth and CO2 production will not blow out your ...


1

Introducing oxygen is nothing to be concerned about at this point. I'd say its safe to go ahead and clean it. Just make sure to sanitize it and anything else you touch that interfaces with the carboy, before you put it back. Some people recommend spraying sanitizer on the mouth of the carboy too.


1

If you have a length of 1/2" I.D. hose, you can make a blowoff hose by incorporating the three-piece airlock. Just take off the airlock cap, remove the dome, and you'll find that the 1/2" I.D. hose fits perfectly on the airlock's center tube! When the airlock becomes significantly fouled, like in your picture, it's probably best to remove it and give it a ...


1

This is known as a "blowoff", and happens under various conditions: (overfull fermentor, temperature, yeast strain, fermentability of wort...) It sounds like you did everything right. As stated above, measuring the gravity gives you much more information than counting the bubbles, since so many things can effect the amount of CO2 coming out of the ...



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