Hot answers tagged

14

I vote for ageing, 45 IBUs isn't that bitter, and the bitterness will round out over time. It's more important that you nail down if this is how it should have turned out, or if there was a process problem, so you can avoid doing the same again in future. Are you accustomed to drinking IPAs? I remember my first which was around 45 IBUs, and thought it was ...


7

The 60 minute addition does indeed contribute to flavor. Its not much but its noticeable. Especially the higher alpha acid varieties. I have brewed several single hops beers with a single shot at 60 minutes, and you can definitely pick out some flavor differences between hop varieties. The beers aren't all simply bitter with no flavor when compared side ...


6

I'd vote for either Galena or Magnum. Both are high-alpha bittering hops that have a very clean, neutral flavor profile. Just good clean bitterness, not the American twang of, say Chinook or Simcoe, nor the "noble" flavor of the German hops. Think of them as the "US-05 of hops". I've used both in bittering additions for English and American ales, although I'...


6

As an alternative to drinking it, you could cook with it and use it in marinades. In this arena you can take advantage of the concentrated flavors and bitterness. Obvious examples would be beer brats, beer cheese soup, beer cheese dip, beer bread etc. Over the time it would take you to cook with 5 gallons of beer, it would still offer you the chance to see ...


5

Bitterness is not linear throughout the boil, so you cannot assume that it will be twice as bitter after 60 minutes vs. 30 minutes. I'm also not sure that you're going to get a great sense of the bitterness in the partially-boiled wort vs. the finished beer, but I don't have a really compelling argument as to why not. But I'm not understanding something ...


5

First wort hopping is the practice of adding hops to kettle when you take first runnings from the mash tun. As the kettle fills you heat the wort to boiling. The "boil hops" are in the kettle before the boil begins and steep in the warm wort. The best way to carry this over to extract brewing would be to add your first hops to the kettle when the wort ...


4

How long is a piece of string? What I'm getting at is that it just comes down to personal preference. For instance, for a lot of styles I prefer a higher cohumulone hop for bittering. In a Munich heavy IPA that high cohumulone helps balance out the maltiness. ANY hop can be used for ANY purpose if you like the results. I don't care for Magnum as a ...


4

Probably comes down to reputation. Cascade has been really popular in the homebrew community for 20 (30?) years. Also... just saw this in Wikipedia... Unlike most varieties of hops, which may be acquired and propagated by the purchase of rhizomes, Amarillo hops are privately grown only by Virgil Gamache Farms; the organization holds a trademark on the ...


3

A quick idea which works for me. After bottled. when serving the beer. Pint glass put 1/4 teaspoon of granulated white sugar (regular sugar u put in coffee). Pour your beer into glass n sugar.Play with this to your liking. Works well for my unbearably bitter IPA.


3

Fuggles aren't typically used for bittering being as their alpha's are so low. I have never experienced a bitter harshness from use of fuggles. Of course it's all recipe dependent, what was your hop schedule?


3

In your position, I'd just brew it, and see how you like the outcome. Many factors affect perception of bitterness - it's far from an exact science. For instance, if the recipe has been stored for any length of time at room temperature, the hop alpha acids in some hop varieties will have deteriorated up to 50% in 6 months. But let's look at the theory all ...


3

Efficiency* will be lower (due to alpha acid degradation) and aromas will be missing, and you'll likely have some cheesy/sweaty off-flavors from isovaleric acid. Toss them and buy some fresher ones. *edit: changed from "utilization".


2

I always have 1 lb of Magnum hops in the freezer. I second buying Magnum a bittering hop suitable for MOST beers. For most beers, the bittering hop does not matter much. All that matters is the correct IBUs for the recipe. So when I follow a recipe that called for say Willamette bittering and say Willamette flavoring hops, I will usually replace the ...


2

In my experience,the bittering hops do contribute to hop flavor outside of bittering. Amarillo has different characteristics and as such would depend on what the brewer wants for their beer.


2

I'm afraid I can't comment from experience, but if you're interested in "weird beers," I highly recommend Randy Mosher's "Radical Brewing." He has a 6-page list of herbs and spices for brewing, and an updated and safe (2 of the 3 traditional gruit herbs are dangerous - bog myrtle is the safe one) gruit recipe. He lists mugwort as a bitter herb, but doesn't ...


2

Bittering hops contribute little to flavor - most of the flavor compounds have been boiled off - or at least, that's the common wisdom. To maintain flavor, hops should be boiled for round 20-30 mins, or dry hopped. You could do an experiment - boil the same amount of hops in a quantity of water for different lengths of time - 60 mins, 45 mins, 30 mins, 15 ...


2

Just today I read the brief descriptions of Herkules and Hallertauer Merkur in Stan Hieronymus's "For the Love of Hops". FWIW, a summary: Herkules is described as "smoothly bitter, a reminder that assessing cohumulone's role is complicated." No discussion of aroma, so I'd follow your nose with this one. Hallertauer Merkur is described as "a bittering hop ...


2

There's plenty of commercial beers that exceed 100 IBUs, some go to absurd levels. A lot of my favorite DIPA's have over 100 (Stone's Ruination being the first that comes to mind). I've had the IBU debate with others who have made the claim of the human threshold on hops. No one has been able to cite a factual source on whether or not such a theory is at ...


2

With the hops you have listed, I'd go with Challenger or Target, and keep the IBU's in the 20-25 range to minimize the flavor. For the Dry Hopping, about an ounce in a 5gal batch is detectable, while a radio of 1:1 ounces/gallons is the standard way to get pungent dry-hop goodness. If you want the dry hop aroma to be fairly strong, I'd split the batch into ...


2

Both Denny Conn and mdma were correct to some extent. I am not able to pick who answered the question fully at this go of it. So I’ll answer with my own results and hope others experiment further to dial in the process. I planned on splitting a 5 gallon batch all along for comparison so I wouldn't feel it wasn't wasted if it didn't turn out. The design ...


2

A hop tea may work. However, the bitterness extracted from hops at pH > 6 becomes progressively harsher with higher pH. Thus, to get a more rounded bitterness, you should not boil in plain water, which has a pH > 7. You could try boiling the hops in a little of the fermented beer, since this will have pH in the ball park of what you need. (Fermented beer is ...


2

Steeping caramel / crystal malts in water may still extract fermentables. As far as I know up to about 30% of what you would get from mash. See this site - it claims that Special B will give out a lot of sugar. If I read the numbers correctly, every 3 grams of steeped Special B will introduce about 1 gram of fermentables. Substitute grams for any unit of ...


2

Its possible that the added vegetal material will be an issue in a style as delicate as Kölsch. But like you mention, I too have loaded up beers with more than twice your proposed amount and been OK (albeit not in a Kölsch). What would worry me more is that 2.3% Alpha Acids is really on the low end for Hallertau. I'd be worried about the quality of the ...


1

Having eaten a quince and tasted a cider apple I do not think that a quince is as bitter as a cider apple, but it may depend on the quince. If the quince juice is tasting as bitter as black tea then I would go with your suggestion and only bitter the half from eating apples. Please report back on how it turns out.


1

Thanks everybody for your help, after some research I think that what I experienced is mostly because of those reasons: Fuggles has a not so low cohumulone content, compared with noble hops. Moreover the one I used was (not English) Fuggles, which has higher cohumulone content than English Fuggles In my particular case the hops used were harvested in 2011 (...


1

Since you don't necessarily need the beer to be completely non-alcoholic, perhaps you could consider brewing an small (session) beer instead? Mashing at the higher end, perhaps with some flavourful caramel malts, wheat or rye for extra body and an small grain bill should give you a head start. I did some experiences with second (and third) runnings from ...


1

You cannot make a truly alcohol free beer. The best commercial brewers can do is get it down to about .5% ABV. At home, most report that about 1.5% ABV can be achieved with boiloff. However, it is reported to have a severely negative impact on flavor. Having tried this, I would advise you not to waste your time. The bitterness is concentrated, not ...


1

Chew paracetamol before drinking it and it will taste great after that! No seriously , I'm sitting here with the same problem. My idea is to balance out with sugar even though that's bringing me away from the dry crispness that I was after. My initial thought was to boil equal amounts of sugar and water to make a simple syrup and then experiment with the ...


1

I would suggest aging the beer, and if that doesnt work, blend it with a nice, sweet, malty amber ale.


1

You could try blending it with another beer, probably would do this when serving. It might taste good mixed with something that has a similar malt profile but obviously less bitterness, maybe a pale ale. In case this sounds weird to you, remember people have been doing it for a long time. Two popular examples are a black & tan - a blend of dark and light ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible