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8

I have been BIAB for some time for similar reasons. How long is a typical BIAB brew day? My setup is an large kettle with a spigot, an immersion chiller and a bag that fits well with a drawstring around the top of my pot. I use an electric stovetop and usually get my water up to temp in 15-20mins for mashing, mash for an hour, squeeze out the bag 5 ...


6

Yes, you can make a concentrated wort and the dilute that after the boil as with extract. The key differences are: lower mash efficiency: higher gravity mashes tend to have lower conversion efficiency. To keep boil volume to a minimum, you might even choose not to sparge, and just use the first runnings - expect conversion efficiency around 50%. More ...


5

Yeah you can scale it down as much as you want . Stove top brews are very easy to manage. The only thing to keep in mind is your efficiency, on a stove top and with a smaller amount of water it can be difficult to perfectly manage your mash temp, because smaller volumes respond more quickly to heat. But with a good thermometer with an alarm (10$ digital meat ...


5

(TOG - GR * (BV/FV)) / (45/FV) = lbs of DME to add pre-boil to hit target OG TOG = Target Original Gravity in Points GR = Gravity Reading in Points BV = Boil Volume (This is what you are taking your reading from) FV = Final Volume (i.e. 5 gallons) 45 = # Gravity Points you get per lb of DME per gallon So lets say you are making a 5 gallon smash beer with ...


5

I've never heard of non-food-grade stainless steel. Some are more or less susceptible to corrosion than others, but as far as I know all stainless steels are food grade. [...] stainless steel is a safe option when it comes to use with food and beverage, as there are no chemicals that can migrate into your food from these products. From ...


4

You are correct in assuming that Partial Mash and All Grain are BIAB-compatible brewing methods. I would say that if you are planning on doing Partial Mash, a bag would be recommended since you usually don't want to lauter the brew (maybe you do in some cases, but not any I have come into contact with). This means that having some specialty grains and ...


4

This sounds perfectly manageable to me. BIAB is especially easy with small batch sizes. However, keep in mind that there's nothing magical about 5 gallons. Sure, you get two cases of beer in return, but you can scale any 5 gallon recipe to a 1 gallon recipe by simply dividing all ingredients by 5. I would suggest you get your feet wet with a 1 gallon ...


4

It's a misconception. You certainly can squeeze the grain bag you use for steeping. Tannin extraction is mainly dependent on pH, so if your pH is OK there shouldn't be a problem. Keep in mind that grain will drop the pH of your water, but of you use too much water for steeping the grain won't be able to drop it enough and you may get tannins.


3

1. How long is a typical BIAB brew day? The time spent on a typical brew day has way too many variables to accurately gauge. But the most typical is going to be around 4-5 hours. 2. What (if any) are the major drawbacks to using this method of brewing? As far as I can tell there are no drawbacks to BIAB. It is a great way to brew beer with limited space ...


3

I have been doing mostly BIAB for my last three batches of beer. I got pretty good efficiency, about what I have gotten on a batch sparge. I do squeeze the bag and haven't bothered to try doing any sort of rinsing. As opposed to brewchez I find that doing BIAB does save time. No time setting up the mash tun or cleaning it. No time spent sparging. Go ...


2

I have done both, and BIAB isn't any faster than batch sparging. The only difference is less equipment really. BIAB is all in one pot and not cooler or mashtun. If you put your first runnings in the kettle and start heating it the next runnings are ready to add long before it comes to a boil. You add them and you are in the same place as with the BIAB at ...


2

I do this all of the time. And it involves no math (that I have to do, anyway). First of all, the day before (or sooner), I have my recipe in the brewing software. I make sure everything looks good (the pre-boil gravity, the post-boil gravity, volumes, etc). After sparging, I take a pre-boil gravity and volume. If I'm ok on volume and low enough on ...


2

Two ideas for you, with the caveat that I have no direct experience with pumps + BIAB, I'm just spitballing here. A false bottom will keep your bag off the kettle floor and away from the outlet. I couldn't easily see if MoreBeer makes a false bottom to fit that particular kettle, but there's probably a generic product that will fit reasonably well. A ...


2

When I started I did a bunch of 3 gallon batches for the same reasons you mention. Now I have transitioned into 5 gallon batches and 2 gallon batches. I tried 1 gallon batches but its far to little beer, and way too hard to control the final amount of liquid obtained, as well as measure everything in such small amounts. I also enjoy tasting the beer after ...


2

I started brewing in January using BIAB. My timeline coincides with what Chris Plaisier reported, although I don't have a wort chiller at this point so it takes longer to get down to pitching temperature. I do sparge with 165 degree F water and that usually requires about 30-45 minutes as he said. With sparging I've been staying very close to 70% ...


2

Moving the wort between kettles complicates things, since you're dealing with both hopped and unhopped extract. While you'll be able to make beer this way, it complicates hitting IBUs. Since you're boiling both kettles anyway, why not add hops in proportion to their volumes, e.g. 2/3 in the 10l kettle and 1/3 in the 5l kettle. There is then no need to ...


1

For a very precise answer, there is actually a paper published in the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers journal ('Water Absorbtion Characteristics of Wheat and Barley During Soaking' Transactions of the ASABE. Vol. 46(2): 361–366 . (doi: 10.13031/2013.12916) @2003) The abstract reads: Water absorption characteristics of wheat and ...


1

Not necessarily a bad method, but it's a little complicated, and it's difficult to predict the outcome in terms of OG and hop utilization. (The hop utilization depends strongly on the SG of the extract you are boiling in, see http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter5-5.html Yes, the resulting IBUs will differ, because the the hop utilization depends on ...


1

I also have had a similar issue. I switched bags from the handmade swiss voile to one I bought at a homebrew shop which had wider mesh. What happened was pretty disturbing. The beer was suddenly full of fine material which was boiling up and creating a very nasty mess on the side of the pot. I cleaned this crap out several times as it built up over the ...


1

Brew in a bag is perfectly manageable for a first time brewer. It's pretty straightforward, and if you already have the equipment for a small batch that's perfect. I started with a 5 gallon kit and then wondered why, once I discovered brew in a bag. There are a couple of things to watch out for though, because in my experience if the batch is too small it ...


1

I'm sure there are some easier ways of doing this, but I enjoy doing my brew calculations by hand! You need to figure out the total gravity "points" of your wort. After you've pulled the bag and rinsed it, take a hydrometer reading. You will most likely need to correct for temperature, most hydrometer's are calibrated to 15C, by 20C they are off by 1 point ...


1

Generic brand Nylon Fine mesh - the finer the better 20 inches deep by 18 inches wide This bag holds at least eight pounds of grain. I BIAB as my pilot system, making 1-3 gallon batches on my stove. A friend of mine thinks any fine nylon mesh will work. You could make one from materials found in an arts & craft store like Michael's or Beverly's ...



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