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5

Belgian beers are usually cited as being "digestible". That means they have a light body that makes them easy to drink. Most Belgian beers you brew should have around 20% sugar to achieve that. Don't get taken in by the Belgian candi sugar rocks at the brew store. Belgian brewers don't use it. Corn or table sugar works just fine, and if you want a ...


5

Many LMEs provide about 1.036 PPG. If this is a five gallon batch, you're talking about a drop of 1.4 points (36*.2/5). Not much to make a big difference in taste IMO. If you want to replace that lost sugar using molasses or syrup, find the points of the sugar and work backwards. Brown Sugar is 46 ppg so you would need .156 pounds to make up the difference ...


4

Well, you should be able to completely ferment it within 3 weeks with proper yeast health and management. Belgian Blonde is not that complex of a beer that it should take months. I'd ferment and bottle. Then you can try the beers a bottles incrementally until you think its perfect and really start drinking them. Seeing how you are going to be reusing some ...


3

A 3 Gallon Carboy is $20 USD i think. I would much rather let my beer condition the proper length of time then be dissatisfied with the end product. After all about $20ish worth of materials probably went into the beer no? As to bottle conditioning vs secondary conditioning. While yes you can simply condition in the bottles you will be waiting longer and ...


3

The two you will want to use are either Wyeast 3763 Roeselare blend, or WLP655 Belgian Sour mix. If you want to get real squirrely, follow the Mad Fermentationist's lead and go grab a (fresh) bottle or two of your favorite sours from the store, smoothly pour out all but the last half inch of the bottle, swirl the dregs settled at the bottom of the bottle, ...


3

I think a typical Belgian Ale lower than 1.070 shouldn't take more than 3-5 months to really come together. Unless you add weird spices that need to settle down over time, or souring bacteria that need a few months to work, then you should be good to go with any "normal" Belgian style that clocks in lower than 1.070. So Blondes, Dubbels, Tripels ... all ...


3

There are literally hundreds of factors affecting head formation and retention. Even though you've eliminated process problems, I'm going to list everything I know of that will harm head. Are you using a partial boil? If so, that could be the biggest problem, as proteins will precipitate out of solution, but then when you dilute the wort after the boil, ...


3

I think what you are really asking is how to make inverted sugar. This is when you break the sucrose down into fructose and glucose to make a more highly and easily fermented sugar. I usually do this for my trippel. To make it I measure out the amount of sugar I am going to put in to my recipe, in this case a pound. Put in a sauce pan with just enough ...


3

Don't bother making rock candy. Just put sugar in. It's exactly the same thing. Cane sugar and beet sugar will give you the exact same flavor after it's been refined. If you want it dark, just caramelize the sugar in a pan before adding it, or add a teeeeeny bit of molasses in with your sugar (since that's what comes out of sugar when it's refined, ...


2

If the temperature schedule was intended for high attenuation and cleanup of yeast byproducts, such as diacetyl and acetaldehyde, then you should keep it at the warm temperature until a minimum of two days after terminal gravity has been reached. If you fermented warm to produce more esters, fusels, and phenols, then you only need to keep the beer at the ...


2

That's a pretty complicated recipe for a tripel. Usually a tripel is just malt and sugar. I don't see the need for the invert sugar and/or honey in your recipe. The aromatic and Munich are also unnecessary, but there's so little of each that it probably won't hurt. This is a very ambitious beer for your first homebrew. You need to be aware that it will ...


2

I think fruit beers are a great example of triple fermented beers, usually wheat, but adding the fruit to the secondary allows for a more gentle fermentation of the fruit leaving behind more of the fruit flavor. This is very common in lambics and heffeweizens. As far as the beer you saw, I wonder if they just added honey or something, I don't know that ...


2

Late in the boil, add honey, candi sugar, maple syrup, molasses, or sorghum (I love this stuff, but it's expensive) if you want to add a little flavor. You could even add them during fermentation, provided you heat-kill the baddies first (mead is made by just heating honey to 150+; there isn't even a boil involved). I tend to take a middle of the road ...


2

I'd say your plan sounds reasonable, if a bit involved. A stab at your primary question: to avoid hassle you'll want to use a mesh bag of some kind, to keep solids out, and the beer clear. It needs to be BIG so that you get good surface area exposed in solution. Also tie it to a string so you can pull it out when finished. Also, a few thoughts went up in my ...


1

The canned puree will be sterile, so the concern about having to wait until secondary to have the alcohol to help sanitize is a moot point. To my mind, the tradeoff with adding late in primary or as part of secondary is really if there is enough yeast in secondary to consume the sugars in the fruit and clean up by-products from the primary ferment. When ...


1

My beer brewing friends tend to use light sorghum as an alternative to LME. It has less impact on the taste than true dark molasses like you find in grocery stores. We find it in the local homebrew stores. But I'm told that purists can tell the difference in the taste. I'd doubt that you could taste the difference in a strong ale. Some of my favorite beer ...


1

I recently brewed a Belgian Dark ale and was comparing notes with another fellow brewer who brewed a Duvell clone. We compared each others beers and they were nearly identical in taste. What's interesting about that is how different our beers were as far as the grain bill was concerned. Mine had a lot of two row base malts but also a lot of specialty grains ...


1

Fermentation practices and pitching rates can have a large effect on beer foam, as Brandon mentioned. There's a great article here beer foam that not only describes this but also includes test you can do to help determine what the problem might be.


1

This is in no way from first-hand experience, but I heard from one of the guys at a local brew shop that some dish soaps can leave a coating on your glasses that will reduce the head size when pouring a beer. Its a bit of a long shot, but its worth trying an extra thorough rising before chilling/using your beer glasses.


1

That level of attenuation( (61-20)/61 = 0.67 ) is a bit low for a Belgian beer. You might be able to get it to finish off the last few points by raising the temperature to 70-72F for a few days and rousing the yeast a couple of times a day by rocking the fermentor to get it swirled up and back into suspension. That may or may not work, since the gravity ...


1

A couple of things - As mentioned, the aromatic and munich malts aren't going to really do much in there. The yeast and additives will mask anything they have to offer. I'd say increase them to get flavor, or drop them for simplicity. Otherwise just be sure to reeeeeally work that yeast starter. Also, you might want to consider dextrose instead of table ...


1

Over on Homebrewtalk the opinion seems to be that it's a beer that has had fermentables added to it twice after the initial brewing. It's fermented once, moved to a secondary where a new fermentable is added & perhaps some different yeast. That's the second fermentation. Then more fermentables are added and it's bottled. The bottle conditioning is the ...



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