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7

Disclaimer: I don't bug my beer, so this is not coming from experience but reasoned conjecture and corroboration by sources. As far as sanitation goes, Brett is as easy to kill as regular brewers yeast. Jess Caudill, microbiologist and brewer at Wyeast, wrote "[Brett] is as easy to kill as any Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of yeast. No crazy chemical ...


5

I would not use finings, I like the cloudiness and believe it to be part of the style, I would not use anything to interfere with this.


4

Try a cleaner glass. Sounds like most of the carbonation is coming out of solution during the pour. Give your glass a rinse with super hot water. A quick rinse with cool water to cool the glass off (hot glass will not help with carbonation), but don't worry about chilling the glass much. Don't bother drying the glass. Then pour your beer. Super clean ...


3

Adding finings is a waste of effort with this style when brewed correctly. It is possible to have too much residual haze stuff in the beer and it will be super cloudy, and maybe even chunky. If your normal pale ales are cloudy, maybe finings are a good idea with this wiesse attempt. That said, some people actually add a little flour to the boil late to ...


2

How a beer looks really doesn't tell you how well fermentation is progressing. A yeast can still be floating around the top and be close to done. Only gravity measurements along the way tell you how its coming. A poorly flocculating yeast would look like this. And A wit yeast stays in suspension better than others anyway. To mean everything sounds ...


2

You could just be under-carbonated. Wit beer, when done properly, has a gorgeous, thick head from all that protein in the wheat, regardless of how carbonated the bottles are. How long has the beer been bottled? Maybe give it another week or two, and make sure you pour it slowly. Did the beer dry out properly? A wit should be lower than 1.014 or so, I think. ...


2

The Belgian Wit Ale yeast is a low producer of phenols but fermentation temperatures on the higher end of the yeasts range will produce more of the spicy phenol characteristics. I made a wit about a month ago and fermented at about 66 and the yeast character turned out relatively low compared to the spice and orange peel I added. I would stay around 66-68 ...


1

I wouldn't throw wort on top of your old brett/pedio/lacto cake, the ratio of bugs will be different from your original pitch. You'll have an abundance of the pedio/lacto and probably not too much brett or saccaromyces left alive. One option of reusing your bugs would be to ferment a batch of beer with a new pitch of saccaromyces and then add some of the ...


1

According to Zainasheff in "Brewing Classic Styles" (for Belgian Wit): Begin fermentation at 68F (20C) slowly raising the temperature to 72F (22C) by the last third of fermentation. I'm guessing that part of that is to clean up diacetyl and the like. Most of the yeast flavor happens in the first 72 hours of fermentation. That's quite a bit warmer ...



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