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2

Pathogens have a hard time surviving very long in finished beer let alone probiotics. Most open fermentation bacteria (lacto, pedio) die off pretty quickly once yeasts have produced alchohol. Further even antibiotics are adversely affected even by consuming alchohol while on them. There are many articles on how habitually consuming a lot of alcohol can ...


2

Like CharlieHorse said, it really doesn't matter much what you use. Although I would like to put in a small caveat, it is worth paying a little attention to what hops you're using together. This guide from Brew Your Own or this guide from Beer Advocate or any other guide available online will describe in broad terms what to expect from the different hops. ...


2

I'm going to pass on a secret about homebrewing... The hop bill isn't all that important unless you're trying to recreate something. For instance, I keep a few cheap hops on hand (a few dollars a pound) for bittering. I adjust according to the bitterness that I want by the Alpha Acid. As far as the flavoring and aroma hops go, use what you like. ...


4

Using what you have, and me not being a fan of centennial, I would use. Magnum (bittering) 60min Willamette (flavor) 30min Willamette (aroma) 2min Those should play nicely since Fat Sam seems to be a US inspired beer. Adjust your hop weights to match the IBU potential of the original hops using the new hops AA%


2

I would recommend that you purchase Brewing Classic Styles. It covers 80+ recipes with lots of details. While you are at it, buy How To Brew. That will teach you how to make great beer. For recipes, go to http://beersmithrecipes.com/


3

As Robert said about cooling. Stay away from Lagers until you get some experience and most important heating and cooling for lager fermentation. Lagers require a diacetyl rest where you usually need heating in addition to cooling. A Blonde Ale was actually my very first brew. I recommend getting an Ale extract kit that has some steeping grains to get your ...


1

Many Pilsner or Helles recipes only use Pilsen Malt (e.g., 4kg) and one kind of hops (e.g., 30 and 40 grams of Hallertauer pellets). Or try a German wheat beer. A web search will turn up plenty of recipes. As a beginner you probably don't have cooling like a chest freezer for fermentation, but depending on where you live you may have a garage or basement ...


-1

Here is a video on how to use the Cool Brewing Fermentation cooler. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=llLlrB4Kbt4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nt7Rl08G9J4


0

Here are a few recipes that you can look at for help: http://beersmithrecipes.com/searchrecipe?uid=&term=Weizen&submit.x=13&submit.y=9&sort=Best+Match&allgrain=1&rated=4


0

Under German purity law any beer labeled Weiss or Weizen must be at least 50% malted wheat in its grain bill. That it purely trivial for a homebrewer, do what your palate likes. Along with jsled, there's nothing like milling your grain on brewday to add to the experience, but a mill does have a pretty big initial investment. ($200 us) Try to find a Local ...


3

It's basically as straightforward as you think. Weissbier/weizen recipes vary, but you're looking at 40-60% wheat malt, with the balance being mostly pilsner or pale/2-row malt, maybe a touch of carapils for residual sugars/body. The biggest thing to note is that crushed grain as a much more limited lifetime than whole grain that you crush on demand. But ...


0

I like the method described by Dogfish Heads Sam Calagione in the book Extreme Brewing Method is to do a fruit addition and rest during the wort chill Chill to 170° and hold for 20 minutes. The book has a nice road map for most popular fruits and their slight temp and time differences. This method is nice as it sanitizes the fruit but doesn't cook it and ...



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