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2

Butter Buds may be a good option for you. (http://www.butterbuds.com/home.html) It has a very buttery flavor. It is fat free which means it won't kill your head retention. While I haven't brewed with it, I have brewed with fat free peanut butter powder for my peanut butter chocolate stout and it worked very well. You should be able to find Butter Buds ...


1

There's a few smells you should worry about, because you're smelling the liquid. For instance, a vinegary smell (suggests acetobacter infection). There are other smells that you should not worry about, because you're smelling the gas leaving the liquid. For instance, sulphur. Most smells during fermentation are in this category, actually. Remember, you ...


0

A starter is not absolutely necessary and has its own drawbacks. Re-hydrating a sufficient quantity of fresh dry yeast is all that is needed to get a good fermentation underway and should make no difference to the quality of the finished product compared to using a starter. The point, as already mentioned, of a yeast starter is to increase the number of ...


5

The primary benefit of a starter is having the proper number of healthy yeast cells to ferment your wort. By "proper number", we mean about 0.75 million cells per milliliter per degree Plato of wort for ales, and 1.5 million cells/mL/P for lagers. (Consider that smack packs and vials have about 100bn cells when fresh, which is only enough cells for 5gl/19L ...


0

I agree with Denny that it's way too soon to worry about your beer. Also, when it's all said and done, it will be VERY obvious if your beer went bad - not just a smell, taste too. I would also recommend that next time you either brew a bigger batch or ferment in a smaller vessel. When you expose your beer to more air, you're less likely to build the CO2 ...


7

It is impossible to predict YOUR FG. I know nothing about your skill level, your fermentation processes (temp, O2, pitching rates). I know nothing about the yeast you plan to use. I know nothing about the true fermentability of the extract and booster you are using. That said some estimates can be made. In the best of scenarios if we assume a 65% ...


1

Sulphites are used in a lot of wines, ciders etc and as a general food preservative. So long as you aren't adding more than the directions call for you should be ok, especially if the packing doesn't give you warning. I use it for my wife's wine and cider at 1/4 teaspoon per 5 gallons. If you still want to rinse ensure you use sanitized water or you could ...


1

Step up to larger kits like Coopers or Muntons. Then you can experiment with steeping specialty grains and adding hop to enhance flavor as well as adding some dry malt extract.


1

I'm going to add my vote for Charlie Papazian's New Complete Joy of Homebrewing. I started with it, and have gotten 5 of my friends into the hobby with just that book. I personally started by getting the book, and then reading the first third of it. This covers starting out, extract brewing, and how to do an extract or kit brew from brew day to bottling. ...


4

John Palmer's How to Brew or Charlie Papazian's New Complete Joy of Homebrewing are good beginner books. In terms of equipment, I suggest using the inventory from the lowest-tier kit sold by Midwest Supplies (currently $70) as a minimal shopping list, plus a 5-gallon kettle, plus a no-rinse sanitizer such as Star-San or Iodophor, and plus a ...


6

Sounds like what you're smelling is some sort of sulfur compound. That's pretty common with that particular strain of yeast. It will eventually age out. How long ago did you brew the beer? What temp did it ferment at?


3

I use it in every batch. Several local breweries in this area, including a rather large one (Yards) use it as well. Word need to be spread about this fantastic product, as it opens the door for most if not all Celiacs to be able to consume beer again, and to rid us of the awful garbage that is sorghum-based gluten-free "beer" (quotes intentional). Yes, the ...


0

Heather has been used in a variety of beers; even one without any hops at all in the Iron Brewer contest in Toronto 2014. It really is interesting and the amount of heather needs to be tuned-in due to its intense taste. A combination of hops and heather tasted - as far as I could say - not as good, or let me say more unexpected. Heather might serve as an ...



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