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1

You should not rack it to secondary. You can improve clarity with: simply waiting longer in primary for more particulate matter to settle cold-crashing to promote yeast settling clarifying agents like Irish moss, gelatin, clarityferm careful racking


0

Since "Leffe Brune" is one of my favorite beer. I have tried to clone it for a while. I have now created a recipe that is incredibly similar. I can not distinguish between the beer in a test. Smoked malt gives the taste of pine tar, and that use of Safbrew T-58 provides a high FG, allowing that the sweetness remains. All malts are from Weyermann. ...


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Just complementing the answer above: Wheat malt also increases the body. It greatly improves the head retention, even in small quantities (5-10%). May result in a slight white haze due to proteins in suspension. When brewing with wheat, it is common to add a protein rest (between 45 and 55 degress Celsius) for breaking down proteins into smaller proteins ...


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This link provides a collection of off flavors. Among them you'll find the yeasty flavor mentioned by Pepi. This once happened to me, but the problem I had was the "undesirable “hot” sensation in the throat", caused by higher alcohols. Nice that your beer tasted good.


1

I have left beer in primary for over a month due to travel, etc. to no ill effects (assuming proper sanitation - problems will be more apparent given more time to infect). The only issue you may have is while the since the yeast flocculates and can be clearer, much of it will drop out of the wort into the trub. If you are bottle priming, this can cause ...


4

An extra month of aging isn't a problem for a beer with healthy yeast stored at an appropriate temperature. It might have been better if it was already bottled, but your yeast have had extra time to eat up residual sugars that tend to make home brew a little heavy, and the yeast should have flocculated more giving a cleaner, clearer beer. The potential ...


0

Sounds like your OG was in the 1.060-1.065 range, which is fine. Did you taste it? If your fermentation is stuck it will still taste sweet like wort. I would not add anything, just give it more time. And as others have mentioned, a hydrometer or refractometer will be the only way to know for sure where you are.


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The other contributor to Acetaldehyde in beer is excessive aging on yeast. As the yeast cells stress, and eventually die, they can lyse (burst) and release AA from the cell interior into the beer. This happens a lot with big, high alcohol beers, because often they have trouble getting to the end fermentation, so the brewers prolong the fermentation time on ...


0

My advice is to team up with a friend/parent who loves beer and decide to go for an easy recipe (beer kit). Take baby steps and have fun. My first two batches were extracts, but then we decided to step up and go whole grain (Brew in a bag) and a whole new world opened.


0

You didn't mention it in your question, but I'm assuming that you've made a 5 gallon batch. When I put those ingredients into Beer Smith, it shows a starting gravity of 1.062, which is perfectly reasonable for an IPA. Let the beer finish fermenting. It will probably take a week or two longer than a lower gravity beer, so be patient. In the end you'll have ...


0

Since you don't have a hydrometer, it will be hard to tell what's really going on. But likely, what happened is that your fermentation got "stuck". In other words, let's assume the recipe's OG was 1.060. John Palmer estimates that each pound of DME yields 40 points of extract per gallon of water, or about 8 points per 5 gallons. Assuming you did a 5 gallon ...


0

I left some beer outside in the 100 degree summer for 3 months under some rocks because I was going on a temp job in DC and I didn't want my cousins to drink them all. While I was away I was told that the heat would cause them all to go bad but when returned home I stuck them in the refrigerator for a couple hours and they all came out fine so I guess it is ...


1

As mentioned, How to Brew by John Palmer is a great book that teaches you the basics, but also allows you to dig into some of the details & more technical aspects of brewing. But don't just read. Listen to The Jamil Show, Brew Strong, Basic Brewing Radio podcasts. They provide a wealth of information.


2

The problem is the twist-off bottles, not the caps or the capper. You need to use pop-top bottles.


4

I recommend reading just enough to learn to brew your first few batches instead of trying to take in all the information at once. And as questions come up while brewing, write them down and devote a great deal of time to researching and answering those questions. As you progress into brewing the application of that knowledge will lead to more questions as ...


3

John Palmer's book "How to Brew" is an excellent place to start and earlier versions are on line for free. It covers all the bases of brewing with quite a bit of technical information. I use this book as a reference tool all the time. If you want to get into the nuts and bolts of the individual components of brewing try the Brewing Element Series from ...


0

there are many good books out there. but it comes down to your intelligence level. my buddy is an idiot. and couldn't understand "The Joy of home brewing" by charlie papazian. so i picked up the nearest thing to a coloring book for him. home brewing for dummies. another great set of books is "yeast", "malt", "hops", "water" but you biggest resource is ...


2

I've tried doing exactly what you describe, without using counter-pressure to fill the growlers. While you can carbonate the beer just fine, at room temperature you'll get so much foaming during transfer (no matter how long your lines are) that it'll probably end up as flat as it was before carbonation by the time you're drinking it. You could try it with ...


4

Yes. The relation between temperature, pressure and volumes of CO₂ are true at higher-than-fridge temperatures, as well. The biggest difference is that with the higher pressure required for the carbonation at the higher temperature, you'll need longer beer serving lines to resist the extra pressure to get a reasonable pour without foaming. Let's say ...


0

I, too, believe I have a malt allergy. I can eat ALL GRAINS when unmalted - so the allergy is NOT GLUTEN. There is something with one of the grains used and what it turns into in the malting process that causes my throat to close and for me to break out in hives. Wheezing is always my first clue though. I have found that SOME beers are ok for me to drink, ...



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