New answers tagged

0

Earthy flavours can be caused by mold spores in the area you store your beer. They tend to occur in damp areas where the mold grow within the walls of the area and then passes a chemical through any porous surface into the beer (even some glass) Next batch you make sanitise the equipment and then sanitise the walls, floors and stands etc where you will be ...


1

It shouldn't be ruined, the yeast should still activate and work its way through your wort without the need to stir. As a previous answer mentioned, stirring your wort at this point in the process isn't a good idea unless you've made sure your stirring instrument is very well sanitized, and even then you still would be introducing oxygen to your batch which ...


1

As already stated above, your batch should be OK. For the record, the instructions on my dry yeast packets (Safale/Saflager) read: PITCHING: sprinkle into wort. I have done this for over 180 brews with a 100% success rate. One key word - "sprinkle", so to avoid the risk of clumping, don't chuck or dump the yeast, sprinkle it. No need to rehydrate, even ...


0

Congratulations on your first brew, I used a similar kit for my first brew and was pretty nervous about the fermentation process as well. All of the bubbling is fine — it won't always be vigorous but at times can just be slow and steady. As long as the bubbles are there you know your beer is doing the right thing.


5

No. There was no need to stir, however; once the yeast become active, they'll start moving throughout the wort (and getting it to move quite a lot) all by themselves. As well, stirring the wort could introduce contaminates or oxygen from the environment. But there should never be a need to stir, either. If you're using dry yeast, you really should rehydrate ...


1

Doubtful you ruined it. As long as you practiced good sanitation. I'm guessing it was dry yeast if it was floating. I would swirl the fermentor to make a whirlpool with the fermentor sealed until it's mixed in. This should remove any yeast stuck to the sides and help get some oxygen in the wort. In the future hydrate your yeast before pitching.


0

Bubbles are a good thing slow or rapid just keep in a dark room temperature between 62-72 you should be fine..


2

There is no formula per se, but I would start, right before bottling, pour a measured amount. and use a syringe to measure out extract, and start with very little and add it in. taste, then decide to add more or less. and then scale it up by five gallons. each extract, is different, and you cant really come up with formula, since each one will be more or ...


0

Your dry yeast will be fine. The reason your kit was in the refrigerator was to preserve the hops. You don't need (or want) to chill your yeast before you use it.


0

Didn't go wrong with WLP715 Champagne yeast. This particular yeast is neutral tasting - as opposed to some estery flavours that most ale yeasts would impart to the end product. And if you are aiming for a higher ABV, this particular strain has a high attenuation and a quite a high alcohol tolerance.


2

It is dried yeast, it will be fine. You should how ever allow it to warm to room temperature before adding it to your wort. And, you should probably look at how to rehydrate it before pitching or make a starter.


1

If I remeber correctly you have the 1 gal. glass carboy and ran a tube from the lid into a pot of sanitized solution. After the bubbling slowed the airlock was supposed to go on. What youre seeing is Krauzen - totally normal amd will sink to the bottom. You should be storing your fermentables in a dark place that stays around 60-70 F ...think cupboard or ...


2

It should not matter that much. if you order it online the postal service won't keep it refridgerated either.


0

Does it: A) Look like beer? B) Smell Like Beer? C) Taste like beer? If the answer to A and B is NO, then don't taste it, if the answer to all if Yes then you are good to go.


0

Dry hopping has a chance of introducing the bacteria that have formed this film, but does not itself cause it. If the brew is still tasting good, keg it and drink it, so long as you have alcohol in there then no pathogens will be able to replicate. I would not bottle as there is a chance of them going Bang! Sometimes these accidents can create great sours. ...


1

The longer you heat it, the stronger it is. Don't use the liquid into it's cooled with the ginger in it. Acid and chili pepper or Cayanne help as well, I use cayenne and lime.good luck


0

If using Liquid Malt Extract(I use Muntons, there are others available) a good starting point for making a great Home Brew is 1L of malt + 9 L of water = 10 L of wort. This is a GREAT start: it will be a well balanced body. Hops? That's your call. Hops makes your base beautiful.



Top 50 recent answers are included