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11

The "cara" in CaraMunich indicates that it's a crystal malt. It's essentially "mashed" in the husk, then kilned to produce sugar and a glassy kernel, like other crystal malts. Munich malt does not go through that process. It's a relatively dark kilned malt than can be used as a base malt. Their flavors and uses are very different. Munich can be combined ...


10

I have been brewing 1-gallon batches at home, and 5-gallon batches at a friend's house, so I have some knowledge on this point. To me, these are the pros and cons with small batches: Pros: My spaghetti pot is large enough to do a full boil. It takes very little room, all of my equipment stores in a small plastic bin, and I can easily ferment anywhere in ...


7

Here is a link to an overview of sugars in beer I have brewed with multiple sugars before but never maple and I'm not certain what golden syrup is. Honey is a very common ingredient. In my uses it leaves a mild honey flavor but ferments out almost completely. I've used brown sugar and it adds a sweetness but I personally feel the raw demerara sugar leaves a ...


7

It's likely since you are bottling directly from your fermentation vessel through a spigot that the spigot is low enough on the vessel that it is able to pull in a bit of the yeast cake as you fill your bottles. Each batches' yeast cake at the bottom of the vessel will vary in size depending on such things as: Original gravity Proteins and cold break in ...


6

Out of my 12-13 brews I have almost always had condensation on the inside of the lid of the fermentation bucket. I have had a thermometer inside the liquid during fermentation, and one on the outside and it does differ quite a bit. Basically the fermentation causes heat => condensation. Totally normal!


6

Yes, get a second bucket. You'll need it for racking. If you plan to use the StarSan sanitizer (recommended) You might even consider a third bucket for holding the StarSan - in an airtight container, StarSan will last a lot longer, so you don't have to make up a fresh batch with each brew or each time you bottle.


6

If you produce the same volume of beer with more malt, this will increase both alcohol and residual sweetness. It's the residual sweetness that will give it a heavier body. A couple other things you could try that won't affect the alcohol content as much: Mash at a higher temperature. Keeping the mash temperature close to 156 F. will lead the creation of ...


6

Your hydrometer has been calibrated to give readings at a specific temperature. Depending on the temp when you first read it and the temp after cooling a two point difference is not that surprising. If you look closely at the hydrometer, it will tell you the calibration temperature of your hydrometer. They are normally done somewhere around 60, 65 or 68F. ...


6

Putting 10.5kg of grain in 11.5 litres of water will kill your efficiency, unfortunately: From Braukaiser: Traditional British style infusion mashes are with about 2-2.5 l/kg (1 - 1.15 qt/lb) very thick and German style mashes are generally much thinner (3.5-5 l/kg / 1.75-2.5 qt/lb). Historically this is rooted in the fact that the latter needed to ...


5

Fruit is not the best color agent here - the flavor will be out of character in an Irish Red. You get the red color from a little roast barley. Take a handful of lightly crushed roasted barley (or two handfulls of whole) and let them stand in half a pint of cold water for half an hour to an hour. Strain the water, which will now be black, boil, then add it ...


5

I agree with Tobias on more unfermentable sugars (high mash temp) and dextrine malts (carapils). I'm adding a separate answer because I've had good luck adding maltodextrin. Carapils, which is supposed to do the same thing, has given me somewhat inconsistent results - that is sometimes I notice it and sometimes I don't. People tend to use maltodextrin more ...


5

First, there is almost never a need to use a secondary fermenter unless you add something to the beer that produces a true secondary fermentation. The idea of using a secondary on a regular basis comes from the commercial brewing industry. The fermenters homebrewers use are far smaller and the risk of autolysis is virtually nonexistent, unlike commercial ...


5

It is indeed not just lactobacillus, but usually a mix of lacto, pediococcus, enterobacter, acetobacter, Brettanomyces, Saccharomyces, &c. There are a number of excellent US sour producers in that area, regionally, but from further afield that you should have distribution of. I believe very few are doing a traditional Guezue Lambic, but many are doing ...


4

I just co authored a book on commercial beer recipes for homebrewers. One of the recipes I got was Rogue Hazelnut Brown ale. The recipe came directly from brewmaster John Maier. They used to use Flavormate extract, but have switched to the Northwestern brand. John says it has much more flavor than other brands. Based upon their usage, 1/2 tsp. for a 5 ...


4

The definition of SRM scale is based on the absorption of light at a single wavelength, so it's only measuring one aspect of color. The way the SRM views color is similar to how things look when you put them behind a yellow filter. Beer color is of course more than one-dimensional - reds, oranges, even some green, but these are not taken into account ...


4

It sounds like you underpitched by quite a large amount. As for options, you have some: Pitch an ale yeast. You'll want to bring the temperature up to at least 17 C to keep the yeast happy. You'll end up with an ale, not a lager, but still a good beer. Raise the temperature for a short while. If you can bring the temperature up to 15 C, you should start to ...


3

When you bottle condition, two things must happen: You add a small amount of sugar (usually dextrose) before bottling, which ferments and produces CO2. If you add too much, bottles explode. Too little, and the beer will be less fizzy. Typically 1/2 to 2/3 of a cup for 22L of beer. Since this is fermenting, the temperature will have some impact on how ...


3

In my experience, I haven't see any significant difference between stirring it vs just sprinkling it in. I've done it both ways and neither seem better than the other. Here is my thinking on why it shouldn't matter: Dry yeast is dormant and it takes time for it to rehydrate and become active. The amount of time it takes for it to rehydrate and become active ...


3

Since you're going to be boiling the kit (either DME or LME - you still have to boil it) - I'd say just add those hops with 5 minutes left to boil then carry on as usual. Generally anything added within 15 minutes of flameout will contribute to aroma as the oils responsible won't be wholly lost - as they would be if you were to boil the same hops for 60 ...


3

I would go with some Sinamar. Its a product from Weyermann made entirely of Black Malt and will add color to the beer without any additional flavor. http://www.williamsbrewing.com/4-OZ-SINAMAR-NATURAL-BEER-COLORING-P2651.aspx SinamarĀ® natural beer coloring was patented by the Weyermann Company in Germany in 1902, and is a gluten free natural mashed ...


3

For this situation, you may want to consider yeast strains where extra phenol and ester production due to a stressful environment is considered a good thing in the final product. Typically Belgian yeast strains are more tolerable of stressful environments, in fact some brewers intentionally raise the temperature of their belgian ales in order to get the ...


3

I asked a while back on adding peppers and was given a link to an excellent article on adding chillies to beer. I went with the dry hopping technique, and used chipotle peppers instead of the original plan of jalapenos or habaneros because I wanted the smokey flavor and I was not at all disappointed by the outcome. In fact, I loved it. I want to do it ...


3

You tagged with first-time-brewer... if this is true, I would caution against making an infused beer right out the gate. Fancy beers can be a tricky proposition. That said, my best guess is that you could do an infusion similar to using vanilla, since it seems like a similar plant. See this question & answers about vanilla. There's some discussion ...


3

First off, I would expect to have sediment in the bottles if you bottle directly from the FV. Actually I am surprised that you havent had this before, probably the muslin bag was catching most of it. In addition, when I am bottling, I like to move my FV to it's racking location a day or 2 in advance of bottling so it has time to settle again after all the ...


3

I like to add honey to ales, but it is a bit tricky to use. If you add it to the boil, it typically dries out completely and is just an expensive way of increasing the alcohol content without adding much in the way of flavor. If you add 50% of your malt bill in honey, you have a braggot. If you add it after primary fermentation is complete, it tends to ...


3

You can always add water to make up the volume. Just be sure the water is sanitized, like boiled and cooled. Boiling is best because it also removes air/oxygen from the water too which slows the staling of the beer. However, adding water will dilute the current flavor, aroma and bitterness profile. If you are OK with that in order to get a full 5 gallons ...


2

The original gravity reading was probably low due to insufficient mixing. Unless you stir the wort vigorously for a good while, it will stratify with sugary wort at the bottom and thin wort at the top. See this question for more details about why your starting gravity might be low. The final gravity reading is probably correct. Did you taste the beer ...


2

In the 80s UK, Boots, the chemists, who already sold home brew kits, developed a yeast that settled at the bottom of bottles as a gel. Unlike the sediment you're used to, that is disturbed when you tip the bottle, this just sat there. Friends, who used to avoid my home brew, said things like, Wow this tastes like real beer. it was clear and sparkling. For ...


2

If they are the same volume then there's probably not much in it. But I would imagine the pail to have more volume than the barrel. For primary fermentation, you need about 1/3 additional volume in the fermentor as headspace. So if you are fermenting 5 gallons, you should aim for a fermentor that's 7-8 gallons in size. The headspace is necessary since the ...


2

If necessary, yes. However you are not at the point where I would even consider finings. It is by no means necessary to use them unless you are unhappy with some aspect of the clarity of the beer. You can achieve a good result by placing your beer in a cold spot for a week or two to allow the proteins, tannis, and yeast to fall out on their own thus avoiding ...



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