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7

Yes (sort of... You can't just warm the bottle up and chuck it in there... It's a little more complicated than that...) but you will need to buy a good quality, bottle conditioned beer (look for sediment in the bottom of the bottle, or the words "bottle conditioned" on the label... Or ask your beer shop...) Basically, most commercial brewers (particularly ...


6

Fermentation temperature is often overlooked and it's really the key to making good beer. If you don't control the temp, everything else you do doesn't really matter. I prefer most beers to ferment in the 63-65F range. Whatever you do, don't let the beer get over 70F. That's beer temp, not room temp. Due to the heat created during fermentation, the beer ...


6

"How safe would that beer be?" If it's steam coming from a commercial appliance (presumably a dish-washer or some other such food-grade device) it wouldn't be any less safe than eating off a dish that came through it. What you might see is a small carry-over of that plastic-y scent into your beer from residuals left after draining. Unsafe? No. ...


6

Alpha acids, pleasant bitterness you want in your beer, are in inactive form in hops. They need to be isomerized to taste the way it should. This takes time and temperature, around an hour of boil to convert all of it. Aromatic components of hops needs only to be washed out. But they degenerate and evaporate with boil, so the shorter you keep them hot, the ...


5

Reboiling will increase bitterness of all the hops that went in 'late' in the kettle. Obviously, as you said you'll lose your aroma charge will decrease in proportion to the length of the reboil. You may likely increase the maillard profile of the malt character depending on how long you boil. The complexity of the original grist will dictate the extent ...


5

No. There was no need to stir, however; once the yeast become active, they'll start moving throughout the wort (and getting it to move quite a lot) all by themselves. As well, stirring the wort could introduce contaminates or oxygen from the environment. But there should never be a need to stir, either. If you're using dry yeast, you really should rehydrate ...


4

There's certainly no harm in trying it again. Any gelatin you add will sink to the bottom regardless of whether or not it takes any haze-causing particles with it. In my experience, different beers have vastly different requirements for fining, some needing several times as much fining as an easy-to-fine one. Some things about IPAs and haze: Hops, ...


4

Technically, you can use baker's yeast, but I doubt you'd be as happy as you would by using brewer's yeast. Both yeasts are Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, they are different strains of the same species that are bred to do two different jobs. Baker's yeast has been bred to produce CO2 and cause bread to rise and brewer's yeast has been bred to survive ...


4

Clones of 21st Amendment Hell or High Watermelon wheat beer tend to add it late in primary or in secondary. Make your beer about 1/8th watermelon, and add everything.


4

Yes. The relation between temperature, pressure and volumes of CO₂ are true at higher-than-fridge temperatures, as well. The biggest difference is that with the higher pressure required for the carbonation at the higher temperature, you'll need longer beer serving lines to resist the extra pressure to get a reasonable pour without foaming. Let's say ...


4

I recommend reading just enough to learn to brew your first few batches instead of trying to take in all the information at once. And as questions come up while brewing, write them down and devote a great deal of time to researching and answering those questions. As you progress into brewing the application of that knowledge will lead to more questions as ...


4

An extra month of aging isn't a problem for a beer with healthy yeast stored at an appropriate temperature. It might have been better if it was already bottled, but your yeast have had extra time to eat up residual sugars that tend to make home brew a little heavy, and the yeast should have flocculated more giving a cleaner, clearer beer. The potential ...


4

It's rather high for a Dunkelweizen. I'd try gently swirling the fermentation vessel to get the yeast off of the bottom. Maybe up the fermentation temp a few degrees too. Do that and try taking some SG readings a couple of weeks later and see if you have got things moving along again. I'd worry that if fermentation is just stuck (and not finished) that ...


4

1.028 is ok, but generally only if you started A LOT higher. First; try moving the fermenter to a warmer area and give it a bit of a swirl/shake to rouse the yeast. See if that helps. Second: make a new yeast starter and pitch that. leave it for a while and see if it solves your problem. Three: Taste the beer. If it tastes good, bottle and enjoy, else, ...


4

Using what you have, and me not being a fan of centennial, I would use. Magnum (bittering) 60min Willamette (flavor) 30min Willamette (aroma) 2min Those should play nicely since Fat Sam seems to be a US inspired beer. Adjust your hop weights to match the IBU potential of the original hops using the new hops AA%


4

'Do you think this will work with most recipes?' I think it will. The thing about intentionally stronger flavors is that they tend to mask other unwanted flavors that develop over time. Precisely why brewing a light beer (say, a Helles) can be so difficult; every little flaw will come through, having no strong flavor to hide it. '...add more hops, ...


4

When you say it got contaminated you mean that some tap water went in contact (mixed) with your wort, right? I wouldn't say that is contamination. IMHO, contamination is that some bacteria has started to grow and eat the nutrients of your wort thus producing some compounds and off-flavours. In this case I wouldn't boil since these compounds are already in ...


4

Depend on a lot of factors. If it was in fermenter only two weeks, one or two more should not hurt. For light beers, under 6% ABV, I never kept them over a month. But I do have few fermenters 3 or 4 weeks old now, waiting to be bottled somewhere next week. Oldest is strongest, of course. For big beers, it was few months between pitch and bottling, and dang, ...


4

Grats on your first brews! Sounds like yeast stress esters from possibly under pitching or lack of oxygen, maybe even autolysis if it's sitting in a primary for 3 weeks. Suggestions: Use a yeast calculator. Single pack or vials are usually only enough up to about 1.040 OG. Use a starter to grow a proper pitch or use multiple packs. Oxygenate your wort. ...


3

Sure. This amounts to a large starter, so you may be slightly overpitching, but I've used the yeast cake from a 5 gallon batch to ferment another 5 gallon batch and had no issues. Depending on the style you are brewing, this could change the flavor somewhat, so to get an optimal pitching rate you could use a yeast calculator and discard part of your yeast ...


3

Just wanted to add the results of my experiments with Clarity Ferm. I've made 3 batches so far with it, in three different styles: an American Pale, a Belgian-ish Saison, and an Amber Ale. I didn't do an A/B test with and without the Clarity Ferm on any of them, but none of them tasted noticeably different than other batches that I've done from the same ...


3

That's not at all an usual occurrence. Bitterness will fade somewhat with time and aroma even moreso. Especially with older hops like you used.


3

John Palmer's book "How to Brew" is an excellent place to start and earlier versions are on line for free. It covers all the bases of brewing with quite a bit of technical information. I use this book as a reference tool all the time. If you want to get into the nuts and bolts of the individual components of brewing try the Brewing Element Series from ...


3

Yes. It's called dunkelweizen. Made with wheat malt and Munich malt. http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/15BDunkelweizen


3

If you were to bottle it as is, the beer will remain just as carbonated (if not less, due to agitation) than it is now. In order to get the carbonation you will need to add some source of fermentables (sugars) be it priming sugar or otherwise. The type and amount of sugar added are largely dependent on style and personal taste. Though there are many an ...


3

Smoked malt is made from base malt...I've never seen it any other way. That means you should always mash it so you don't end up with unconverted starch in your beer.


3

If the beer tastes good, there is no reason to throw it out. You may not have any fermentable sugars left, after 2-3 days of stable gravity it usually means the yeast is done, you may bottle as it is but only if you are convinced that the fermentation is done. To make sure fermentation is over, you can adjust the temperature since 18C seems a bit cold. ...


3

You don't. Watering down beer is bad idea, because you will end up with something with no taste, no kick etc. You could add vodka or rectified alcohol, and something for taste, but due to tax rules on strong liquor in most countries it would be far cheaper to simply buy more beer.


3

The cider / vinegar smell is normal, it is acetaldehyde and is a normal byproduct of fermentation. But it's a temporary byproduct, the yeast will consume it to recover NAD+ from NADH after all oxygen has been gone for a while. If I recall correctly, even acetobacter needs oxygen to actually make vinegar. So the problem is apparently oxygen more than ...


3

It's basically as straightforward as you think. Weissbier/weizen recipes vary, but you're looking at 40-60% wheat malt, with the balance being mostly pilsner or pale/2-row malt, maybe a touch of carapils for residual sugars/body. The biggest thing to note is that crushed grain as a much more limited lifetime than whole grain that you crush on demand. But ...



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