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7

It is impossible to predict YOUR FG. I know nothing about your skill level, your fermentation processes (temp, O2, pitching rates). I know nothing about the yeast you plan to use. I know nothing about the true fermentability of the extract and booster you are using. That said some estimates can be made. In the best of scenarios if we assume a 65% ...


7

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


6

Sounds like what you're smelling is some sort of sulfur compound. That's pretty common with that particular strain of yeast. It will eventually age out. How long ago did you brew the beer? What temp did it ferment at?


6

Fermentation temperature is often overlooked and it's really the key to making good beer. If you don't control the temp, everything else you do doesn't really matter. I prefer most beers to ferment in the 63-65F range. Whatever you do, don't let the beer get over 70F. That's beer temp, not room temp. Due to the heat created during fermentation, the beer ...


6

"How safe would that beer be?" If it's steam coming from a commercial appliance (presumably a dish-washer or some other such food-grade device) it wouldn't be any less safe than eating off a dish that came through it. What you might see is a small carry-over of that plastic-y scent into your beer from residuals left after draining. Unsafe? No. ...


5

Check out the 3-part article below. It details experiments using different amounts of Clarity Ferm on different styles of beer. The findings were that Clarity Ferm breaks down gluten nearly completely - well below the "gluten free" maximums - in all beers. http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-i http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-ii ...


5

I use it in every batch. Several local breweries in this area, including a rather large one (Yards) use it as well. Word need to be spread about this fantastic product, as it opens the door for most if not all Celiacs to be able to consume beer again, and to rid us of the awful garbage that is sorghum-based gluten-free "beer" (quotes intentional). Yes, the ...


5

If you are batch sparging the rate has minimal impact of efficiency. If you are fly sparging in most certainly can have an effect, slower is usually better. Finding the balance between a speedy enough brew session and decent efficiency is a personal choice. Shooting for 75% is probably fine and some report getting better beer without pushing into the 80+% ...


5

What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


5

The primary benefit of a starter is having the proper number of healthy yeast cells to ferment your wort. By "proper number", we mean about 0.75 million cells per milliliter per degree Plato of wort for ales, and 1.5 million cells/mL/P for lagers. (Consider that smack packs and vials have about 100bn cells when fresh, which is only enough cells for 5gl/19L ...


5

I strongly doubt it will stand up to boiling water. Also boiling water isn't a guaranteed way to sanitize equipment - bacteria can still remain in hard to reach places. You should instead get hold of a sanitizer specifically developed for brewing: Iodophor, Star San are the two most popular.


5

Do not do this! Speaking from experience. I accidentally put my auto siphon into a bucket that was full of near boiling water. I turned away for just a minute and the plastic had softened enough that I now own a "J" shaped autosiphon. Needless to say I can't use it anymore. If you want to boil sanitize equipment like this you can get a stainless racking ...


4

John Palmer's How to Brew or Charlie Papazian's New Complete Joy of Homebrewing are good beginner books. In terms of equipment, I suggest using the inventory from the lowest-tier kit sold by Midwest Supplies (currently $70) as a minimal shopping list, plus a 5-gallon kettle, plus a no-rinse sanitizer such as Star-San or Iodophor, and plus a ...


4

First, expressing evaporation rate as a % is completely the worng way to do it. Boil is a constant gal./hr. and does not change due to batch size. You don't boil off twice as much for a 10 gal. batch as a 5 gal. batch. 6 liters/hr. is about what my boil off is using a converted keg kettle and a propane burner. I try to set the flame to the same level ...


4

I use this in every beer I make. My father is highly allergic to gluten and he is able to drink all of my beer.


4

I can't answer as to how myrtlewood would affect the beer, but I do want to mention that it's generally not a good idea to let anything made of wood touch your wort or beer after the boil because the porous wood can harbor all kinds of microbes. Around the 15th century, some of the brewing monks started to catch on to the way the angels (yeasts) were ...


4

For a typical 5% ABV beer, brewed between 16 and 20°C, allow 10-14 days for fermentation to stop, and few more days for the yeast to clear. But using bread yeast might get you a different result. Starting with about 10% sugar you would expect to get a 4-5% beer, but your yeast might have other ideas and quit before it gets that far. After the bubbling ...


4

You can use a beer priming-sugar calculator to determine the correct amount. For 2L of beer, which probably already has ~2 volumes of CO₂, you probably only need 3-5g of table sugar and just a sprinkle of yeast, and then you're mostly just going to presurize the vessel instead of really carbonating the beer itself. If you let the beer go flat, first, assume ...


4

It's impossible to know what you're creating when you did not tell us about any of: the recipe extract or all grain; mash temperature gravity readings what size/volume fermentor; bucket or carboy yeast fermentation temperature As for the fermentor: it's great (!) that there is foam coming out the airlock since that means it won't explode. But the fact ...


4

Technically, you can use baker's yeast, but I doubt you'd be as happy as you would by using brewer's yeast. Both yeasts are Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, they are different strains of the same species that are bred to do two different jobs. Baker's yeast has been bred to produce CO2 and cause bread to rise and brewer's yeast has been bred to survive ...


4

There's certainly no harm in trying it again. Any gelatin you add will sink to the bottom regardless of whether or not it takes any haze-causing particles with it. In my experience, different beers have vastly different requirements for fining, some needing several times as much fining as an easy-to-fine one. Some things about IPAs and haze: Hops, ...


4

Clones of 21st Amendment Hell or High Watermelon wheat beer tend to add it late in primary or in secondary. Make your beer about 1/8th watermelon, and add everything.


4

Yes. The relation between temperature, pressure and volumes of CO₂ are true at higher-than-fridge temperatures, as well. The biggest difference is that with the higher pressure required for the carbonation at the higher temperature, you'll need longer beer serving lines to resist the extra pressure to get a reasonable pour without foaming. Let's say ...


4

I recommend reading just enough to learn to brew your first few batches instead of trying to take in all the information at once. And as questions come up while brewing, write them down and devote a great deal of time to researching and answering those questions. As you progress into brewing the application of that knowledge will lead to more questions as ...


4

An extra month of aging isn't a problem for a beer with healthy yeast stored at an appropriate temperature. It might have been better if it was already bottled, but your yeast have had extra time to eat up residual sugars that tend to make home brew a little heavy, and the yeast should have flocculated more giving a cleaner, clearer beer. The potential ...


3

Star-San is the best answer -- BUT: DO NOT use it after, ie: so as to clean and store for later use. Star-San is acidic and prolonged/sustained contact will make your plastic brittle and break (I have broken a siphon tube like this after only a few months of doing this afterbrew sanitizing). Use Star-San ONLY just before use for anything plastic/vinyl ...


3

That's not at all an usual occurrence. Bitterness will fade somewhat with time and aroma even moreso. Especially with older hops like you used.


3

Sure. This amounts to a large starter, so you may be slightly overpitching, but I've used the yeast cake from a 5 gallon batch to ferment another 5 gallon batch and had no issues. Depending on the style you are brewing, this could change the flavor somewhat, so to get an optimal pitching rate you could use a yeast calculator and discard part of your yeast ...


3

John Palmer's book "How to Brew" is an excellent place to start and earlier versions are on line for free. It covers all the bases of brewing with quite a bit of technical information. I use this book as a reference tool all the time. If you want to get into the nuts and bolts of the individual components of brewing try the Brewing Element Series from ...


2

We did some fruit pale ales last year with dehydrated fruit. We have a dehydrator and dried the fruit at 165 to kill off baddies and sealed it up till use. We did pineapple, kiwis, strawberries and chili peppers, non had any infection, even 6 months after. So it's an idea. Also the strawberry tasted amazing!



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