Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

The "cara" in CaraMunich indicates that it's a crystal malt. It's essentially "mashed" in the husk, then kilned to produce sugar and a glassy kernel, like other crystal malts. Munich malt does not go through that process. It's a relatively dark kilned malt than can be used as a base malt. Their flavors and uses are very different. Munich can be combined ...


8

Yes, this is to be expected and perfectly normal - when you have a half filled container of beer, the carbon dioxide that's dissolved in the beer will come out of the beer to fill the space available, so you have less carbon dioxide in the beer, and less fizz. You can try keeping the half-filled bottles cool which will retain more carbon dioxide in the ...


7

It is impossible to predict YOUR FG. I know nothing about your skill level, your fermentation processes (temp, O2, pitching rates). I know nothing about the yeast you plan to use. I know nothing about the true fermentability of the extract and booster you are using. That said some estimates can be made. In the best of scenarios if we assume a 65% ...


6

Your hydrometer has been calibrated to give readings at a specific temperature. Depending on the temp when you first read it and the temp after cooling a two point difference is not that surprising. If you look closely at the hydrometer, it will tell you the calibration temperature of your hydrometer. They are normally done somewhere around 60, 65 or 68F. ...


6

Putting 10.5kg of grain in 11.5 litres of water will kill your efficiency, unfortunately: From Braukaiser: Traditional British style infusion mashes are with about 2-2.5 l/kg (1 - 1.15 qt/lb) very thick and German style mashes are generally much thinner (3.5-5 l/kg / 1.75-2.5 qt/lb). Historically this is rooted in the fact that the latter needed to ...


6

It is indeed not just lactobacillus, but usually a mix of lacto, pediococcus, enterobacter, acetobacter, Brettanomyces, Saccharomyces, &c. There are a number of excellent US sour producers in that area, regionally, but from further afield that you should have distribution of. I believe very few are doing a traditional Guezue Lambic, but many are doing ...


6

Sounds like what you're smelling is some sort of sulfur compound. That's pretty common with that particular strain of yeast. It will eventually age out. How long ago did you brew the beer? What temp did it ferment at?


5

The best way to get started is to find out if you have a friend, co-worker, or other acquaintance who brews and is willing to brew a batch or two with you. This is ideal as you don't need to buy anything to get started -- your friend will have it all. Of course, bringing a six-pack or buying the batch's ingredients is always a good gesture :). If you find ...


5

The oils aren't produced from dry hopping, the oils are in the hop cones themselves. Its the stuff in the lupulin glands of the cones that contains the oils. I usually see the oil floating on top of the beer in the carboy. But that likely isn't the only place the oil goes. Its pretty sticky stuff and a lot of it sticks to the yeast, proteins, trub and ...


5

First, there is almost never a need to use a secondary fermenter unless you add something to the beer that produces a true secondary fermentation. The idea of using a secondary on a regular basis comes from the commercial brewing industry. The fermenters homebrewers use are far smaller and the risk of autolysis is virtually nonexistent, unlike commercial ...


5

Check out the 3-part article below. It details experiments using different amounts of Clarity Ferm on different styles of beer. The findings were that Clarity Ferm breaks down gluten nearly completely - well below the "gluten free" maximums - in all beers. http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-i http://beerandwinejournal.com/clarity-ferm-ii ...


5

I use it in every batch. Several local breweries in this area, including a rather large one (Yards) use it as well. Word need to be spread about this fantastic product, as it opens the door for most if not all Celiacs to be able to consume beer again, and to rid us of the awful garbage that is sorghum-based gluten-free "beer" (quotes intentional). Yes, the ...


5

In the context of bottled beer, the "dregs" refer to the cake of (mostly) yeast and coagulated proteins that form in the bottom of bottle conditioned beers. The reason why anyone would care about this gunk (which you usually don't drink), is that since its mostly yeast, and mostly still viable/alive, you can collect these dregs and add sugars to grow them ...


5

If you are batch sparging the rate has minimal impact of efficiency. If you are fly sparging in most certainly can have an effect, slower is usually better. Finding the balance between a speedy enough brew session and decent efficiency is a personal choice. Shooting for 75% is probably fine and some report getting better beer without pushing into the 80+% ...


5

What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


5

The primary benefit of a starter is having the proper number of healthy yeast cells to ferment your wort. By "proper number", we mean about 0.75 million cells per milliliter per degree Plato of wort for ales, and 1.5 million cells/mL/P for lagers. (Consider that smack packs and vials have about 100bn cells when fresh, which is only enough cells for 5gl/19L ...


5

I strongly doubt it will stand up to boiling water. Also boiling water isn't a guaranteed way to sanitize equipment - bacteria can still remain in hard to reach places. You should instead get hold of a sanitizer specifically developed for brewing: Iodophor, Star San are the two most popular.


5

Do not do this! Speaking from experience. I accidentally put my auto siphon into a bucket that was full of near boiling water. I turned away for just a minute and the plastic had softened enough that I now own a "J" shaped autosiphon. Needless to say I can't use it anymore. If you want to boil sanitize equipment like this you can get a stainless racking ...


4

I use this in every beer I make. My father is highly allergic to gluten and he is able to drink all of my beer.


4

It sounds like you underpitched by quite a large amount. As for options, you have some: Pitch an ale yeast. You'll want to bring the temperature up to at least 17 C to keep the yeast happy. You'll end up with an ale, not a lager, but still a good beer. Raise the temperature for a short while. If you can bring the temperature up to 15 C, you should start to ...


4

The color is just from the oils of the hops, likely discolored further from extended use and boiling. You sanitizing it by boiling it will kill off most unwanted bacteria from settling in. If you're worried that it'll get too grimy, weight it down into an Oxy-Clean or PBW solution for 24-48 hours, taking it out periodically to scrub it and rinse it before ...


4

First, expressing evaporation rate as a % is completely the worng way to do it. Boil is a constant gal./hr. and does not change due to batch size. You don't boil off twice as much for a 10 gal. batch as a 5 gal. batch. 6 liters/hr. is about what my boil off is using a converted keg kettle and a propane burner. I try to set the flame to the same level ...


4

John Palmer's How to Brew or Charlie Papazian's New Complete Joy of Homebrewing are good beginner books. In terms of equipment, I suggest using the inventory from the lowest-tier kit sold by Midwest Supplies (currently $70) as a minimal shopping list, plus a 5-gallon kettle, plus a no-rinse sanitizer such as Star-San or Iodophor, and plus a ...


4

I can't answer as to how myrtlewood would affect the beer, but I do want to mention that it's generally not a good idea to let anything made of wood touch your wort or beer after the boil because the porous wood can harbor all kinds of microbes. Around the 15th century, some of the brewing monks started to catch on to the way the angels (yeasts) were ...


3

For this situation, you may want to consider yeast strains where extra phenol and ester production due to a stressful environment is considered a good thing in the final product. Typically Belgian yeast strains are more tolerable of stressful environments, in fact some brewers intentionally raise the temperature of their belgian ales in order to get the ...


3

You can always add water to make up the volume. Just be sure the water is sanitized, like boiled and cooled. Boiling is best because it also removes air/oxygen from the water too which slows the staling of the beer. However, adding water will dilute the current flavor, aroma and bitterness profile. If you are OK with that in order to get a full 5 gallons ...


3

I like to add honey to ales, but it is a bit tricky to use. If you add it to the boil, it typically dries out completely and is just an expensive way of increasing the alcohol content without adding much in the way of flavor. If you add 50% of your malt bill in honey, you have a braggot. If you add it after primary fermentation is complete, it tends to ...


3

It means exactly the same thing in brewing...liquid remnants. Expanding a little, typically the yeast sediment you see at the bottom of the bottle of your home brew is referred to as "the dregs". As a home brewer becomes more experienced and familiar with yeast, they may actually use a technique called "yeast harvesting," where they actually harvest "the ...


3

You can continue to reuse the bag plenty, a bit of coloration from the hops and beer is no a problem. Boiling will kill everything you're worried about, although you can also soak the bag in sanitizer. The best method I have found for cleaning hop bags is the washing machine. Throw all your brewing towels, hop bags, grain sacks, etc. in the washing ...


3

You can also try bleaching the bag. That should return it to a white-ish color. Just wash it afterwards! I believe you can use the bag as long as it is structurally sound and the material has not started to break apart.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible