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5

No. There was no need to stir, however; once the yeast become active, they'll start moving throughout the wort (and getting it to move quite a lot) all by themselves. As well, stirring the wort could introduce contaminates or oxygen from the environment. But there should never be a need to stir, either. If you're using dry yeast, you really should rehydrate ...


4

Grats on your first brews! Sounds like yeast stress esters from possibly under pitching or lack of oxygen, maybe even autolysis if it's sitting in a primary for 3 weeks. Suggestions: Use a yeast calculator. Single pack or vials are usually only enough up to about 1.040 OG. Use a starter to grow a proper pitch or use multiple packs. Oxygenate your wort. ...


3

Well its purely speculation but if the off flavor is the same across three batches, and you're sure your sanitizing process is spot on, I'd say its likely to be either your fermentation temperature, your water or a little of both. If the beers are a little fruitier than you'd expect that could be fermentation temperature. If you ambient temp is 72F you ...


2

There is no formula per se, but I would start, right before bottling, pour a measured amount. and use a syringe to measure out extract, and start with very little and add it in. taste, then decide to add more or less. and then scale it up by five gallons. each extract, is different, and you cant really come up with formula, since each one will be more or ...


2

It is dried yeast, it will be fine. You should how ever allow it to warm to room temperature before adding it to your wort. And, you should probably look at how to rehydrate it before pitching or make a starter.


2

It should not matter that much. if you order it online the postal service won't keep it refridgerated either.


1

If you're using malt extract, this could be "extract twang." Not all extract gives this off flavor, but some does. I suspect it mostly depends on the quality and age of the extract. It seems to be more of a problem with liquid extract than dry. I would describe the off flavor as a slight sourness in the finish, accompanied by a sort of astringent dryness. ...


1

It shouldn't be ruined, the yeast should still activate and work its way through your wort without the need to stir. As a previous answer mentioned, stirring your wort at this point in the process isn't a good idea unless you've made sure your stirring instrument is very well sanitized, and even then you still would be introducing oxygen to your batch which ...


1

As already stated above, your batch should be OK. For the record, the instructions on my dry yeast packets (Safale/Saflager) read: PITCHING: sprinkle into wort. I have done this for over 180 brews with a 100% success rate. One key word - "sprinkle", so to avoid the risk of clumping, don't chuck or dump the yeast, sprinkle it. No need to rehydrate, even ...


1

Doubtful you ruined it. As long as you practiced good sanitation. I'm guessing it was dry yeast if it was floating. I would swirl the fermentor to make a whirlpool with the fermentor sealed until it's mixed in. This should remove any yeast stuck to the sides and help get some oxygen in the wort. In the future hydrate your yeast before pitching.


1

If I remeber correctly you have the 1 gal. glass carboy and ran a tube from the lid into a pot of sanitized solution. After the bubbling slowed the airlock was supposed to go on. What youre seeing is Krauzen - totally normal amd will sink to the bottom. You should be storing your fermentables in a dark place that stays around 60-70 F ...think cupboard or ...


1

Earthy flavours can be caused by mold spores in the area you store your beer. They tend to occur in damp areas where the mold grow within the walls of the area and then passes a chemical through any porous surface into the beer (even some glass) Next batch you make sanitise the equipment and then sanitise the walls, floors and stands etc where you will be ...



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