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49

Brewing day Sanitizer - To sanitize all of your equipment. 6 gallon fermenter - For primary fermentation. Funnel or Tubing - To transfer from the brew kettle to the fermenter (pour or siphon) +3 gallon brew kettle - For boiling the mixture and making wort Thermometer - To monitor the temperature of the wort Hydrometer - To test the original gravity of your ...


36

From John Palmer in the "Ask the Experts" section of the AHA forum: Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ANY ale, except when conducting an actual second fermentation, such as adding fruit or souring. Racking to prevent autolysis is not necessary, and therefore the risk of oxidation ...


30

DO NOT put them in the fridge after three days. You'll want to store the newly bottled beer at around 70 degrees for a few weeks. Since you are bottle conditioning, the yeast will need time to carbonate the beer. If you put the beer in the fridge now, the yeast will drop out before it finishes eating the priming sugar, and you'll have flat beer. With ...


27

All grain is cheaper (in the not-so-long run), you get way more flexibility on your grain bill and mash, I'd argue it's more fun, and it's really easy to do.


23

You are doing absolutely nothing wrong. Many people are far too quick to drink their precious homebrew and most beers benefit a lot from aging. A few months for ales and simple lagers. Beers with a high ABV should be aged much longer. I make a Chimay Grand Cru clone that I typically don't try for 4-6 months. Aging remove a lot of the "hot" taste from ...


20

I would point you to the Basic Starter Kit from Northern Brewer: http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/starter-kits/basic-starter-kit.html Some items are probably not STRICTLY needed, but for $80 you definitely get all the gear you would need to get started.


20

Gyspum (CaSO4) does a couple different things. If you add it to the mash, it can lower the pH. The added sulfate content will also accentuate the bitterness of your beer. If you want to increase the sulfate for bitterness enhancement but don't want to change your mash pH, you can add it directly to the kettle. The best way to decide how much to add is to ...


19

Personally I compost it most of the time. I have used it to make bread, and pizza crust. Typically i just grab maybe 2 cups of it while it's still wet and fresh from the mash, then add the typical ingredients of a wheat bread recipe (milk, butter, etc). I then add enough flour to make the dough ball 'look like dough', then proceed as normal. I'm pretty ...


18

If I wash my hands regularly do I need to sanitize them as well? Do I even need to wash regularly, between touching everything? No. As long as you're not touching the insides of bottles, fermenters etc. you should be fine. Do I need to sanitize the rim of the mouths of bottles? Yes. Dipping the ends of the bottles into a container of your ...


18

Newcastle is a Northern English Brown ale. It has a pale ale malt base with some caramel malts. It also has small amounts of darker malts like chocolate to provide color and the nutty flavor. They also use English hop varieties for bittering, flavor and aroma. It is drier, cleaner, less fruity, and slightly hoppier than the Southern English Brown. ...


17

John Palmer's "How to Brew" is one of the most recommended books for anyone starting out with brewing. He goes over the process, the ingredients, and everything else you need to know to start out. It's available online for free, or for about $15 on Amazon.


17

There are a few methods, each with advantages and drawbacks. Cool your Kettle Take your hot brew kettle, full of wort, and submerge it in ice water. Advantages: No real equipment expense, just take your pot and put it in a cooler or bathtub full of ice water. Drawbacks: Extremely slow, higher risk of contamination. Probably have to change out the ice ...


17

If brewing all-grain, taking gravity readings after mashing allows you to calculate your mash efficiency. If your efficiency is low (meaning you're not getting good conversion), you can use this knowledge to pin down problems in your recipe, milling, and mash/sparge processes. Measuring the gravity before and after fermentation allows you to calculate the ...


16

There is an infection risk any time you open up your fermenter and especially when you throw stuff into it. If you dry hop at the right time you reduce that risk. The alcohol built up protects against infection The hops already in the beer act as a preservative The pH is unfriendly to new growth Most of the easy to eat sugars are already consumed For ...


16

So it turns out: The proper amount of oxygen dissolved in wort is 8-10 ppm. Shaking typically yields around 4 ppm. It's possible to achieve as much as 8 ppm with plenty of headspace and LOTS of vigorous shaking. As an example, 5 minutes of shaking a 1.077 wort may only achieve 2.7 ppm. Siphon sprayers will be in the same range. Air with an Oxygen Stone ...


15

First off, Simon, your answer was spot-on in answering Jarrod's questions with logical, proven answers. Props. However, Jarrod is asking for anecdotal advice, so here's mine: In practicality, you can actually often get away with a lot of carelessness. The problem, though, is this: while the risk is low, the stakes are fairly high. I absolutely hate ...


15

2-row: Favored by European brewers Lower protein content Yields greater theoretical extract Tend to be more uniform in kernel size (better for less-sophisticated mills) 6-row: Grows better in the U.S. and is cheaper, so used by big domestic breweries More enzymes and husks help with adjunct cereals (so good for e.g. an oatmeal stout) Higher protein ...


15

You want to boil with your lid off. Part of the process of boiling is to remove dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which is a sulfur compound off flavor that tastes like cooked corn. DMS is formed by heating the wort. If you leave the lid on the kettle DMS won't evaporate with the steam and you'll have more of the flavor in your beer. You might also run the risk of ...


15

I'd recommend the book Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers. Don't let the name put you off, it's packed with lots of useful historical information on brewing before the advent of hop usage. The Homebrewer's Garden is also a good book on this subject, and a bit more succinct. Yarrow is good for bittering, and grows wild throughout the US. It can be more of ...


14

Pitching yeast into wort that is too warm can cause a number of problems. At the very worst, you'll shock the yeast and/or kill it, and you'll have a stuck fermentation. Another problem with pitching too warm (and maintaining fermentation too warm) is that it can cause the yeast to produce unwanted off-flavors in the beer. Letting the wort sit longer to ...


14

Boiling is a fairly poorly understood process. That being said here is what I know. Partial-wort Boil Ups You probably already have all the necessary equipment Small footprint Easy to manage You can use your kettle for other things Downs Hop utilization suffers, meaning you must use more hops to get the same level of bitterness There is a limit to ...


14

I found How to Brew to be a very helpful book along with The Complete Joy of Homebrewing. I feel like it complimented Papazian's book well, and in some cases was a bit easier to read, or filled in any lingering questions I had. In the end everyone seems to go with Papazian's, but I think How to Brew was an easier read.


13

Assuming you're beginning from concentrated malt or a kit, and can figure out how to boil water on your own, The bare minimum: 5 gallon plastic (food grade container) with lid. Airlock for same. Bottles, and appropriate closures for them. Plastic hose for siphoning off of finished product. Disinfectant (chlorine or sulfite) Recommended: 5 Gallon ...


13

Following normal, reasonable sanitation practices (always sanitize containers and utensils immediately before use) usually keeps the risk of infection pretty low. The greatest risk of infection after containers and utensils is simply open air. Keep your containers covered while working, even if you're just turning away for a few minutes. Keep your empty ...


13

Temperature can often be the reason. I had a Christmas beer that didn't carbonate because my basement was too cold. I simply took the bottles to a warmer place and they carbonated in the normal time. Here are some reasons a beer won't carbonate: Temperature: If the beer is too cold it can put the yeast into hibernation. Warming up the bottle might be all ...


12

Hop aroma will dissipate over time. I found that dry hopping just as fermentation was ending (primary vessel, no secondary) resulted in losing most of the aroma over the next 1-2 weeks, but the room smelt great. I'd suggest: More hops. Don't leave them in so long. Try 3 or 4 days before you bottle. Longer times might also result in unwanted grassy or ...


12

You generally want to add fruit to the secondary fermentation. At this point, you already have alcohol that can help ward off any meanies hiding in your fruit. I am having trouble finding a source for this but I remember from a course I took that adding fruit to the primary will add more fruit smell and secondary would add more flavor. The smell part ...


12

The first thing you must learn how to do is make a yeast starter. This is simpler than making beer but your sanitation must be very good, don't be intimidated. Yeast Starter Mix malt extract and water to make two quarts of 1.030 to 1.040 gravity starter wort. Consider optionally adding yeast nutrient. Sterilize this by boiling for 10 minutes. Cool to ...


12

The definition of beer is a fairly wide one. I'll quote from wikipedia: [Beer] is produced by the brewing and fermentation of starches, mainly derived from cereal grains—most commonly malted barley, although wheat, maize (corn), and rice are widely used. Most beer is flavoured with hops, which add bitterness and act as a natural preservative, though ...


11

The Complete Joy of Home Brewing



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