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This is not a great hobby if your goal is to save money on beer costs. It takes a long time to recoup the cost of equipment when you save pennies per glass. And there is always more equipment to try... That being said, the cheapest and lowest risk way to get into the hobby with making one-gallon batches. You can get a one-gallon recipe/ingredient kit from ...


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First I would stick with 5 gallon equipment and brew half sized batches. Barrel half and bottle the other half. Then you have side by side comparators. I don't think worrying about angel's share is a concern. With such a small barrel the surface contact to volume ratio is going to be huge. The first few batches will likely develop huge oak flavors very ...


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I wouldn't bother getting smaller equipment. Assuming you brew 5 gallon batches, why not just ferment your beer as usual, then move 1.3 gallons into the barrel, and bottle the remaining 3.7 gallons? I have a small 1L barrel filled with rum. Over the last 6th months, I've lost about 1/2 of it (due to seepage, not evaporation). My barrel is physically ...


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After startup cost of equipment, ingredients can be cheap if you brew within a somewhat narrow style range and buy ingredients in bulk. That said you can almost eliminate startup costs if you choose to brew in smaller batch sizes that allows you to use equipment you already have. Like your largest stock pot and you sink for chilling. As you get better at ...


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The more you do (the less others do for you) and the more you buy the cheaper it will be. Go all-grain, grind your own grain, buy in bulk. Assuming you can store them properly, begin buying base malts and hops in larger volumes. Since you'll likely have only a few malt varieties on hand, you 'll need to adjust your recipes to use the base malts you have ...



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