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4

An extra month of aging isn't a problem for a beer with healthy yeast stored at an appropriate temperature. It might have been better if it was already bottled, but your yeast have had extra time to eat up residual sugars that tend to make home brew a little heavy, and the yeast should have flocculated more giving a cleaner, clearer beer. The potential ...


4

I recommend reading just enough to learn to brew your first few batches instead of trying to take in all the information at once. And as questions come up while brewing, write them down and devote a great deal of time to researching and answering those questions. As you progress into brewing the application of that knowledge will lead to more questions as ...


3

Yes. It's called dunkelweizen. Made with wheat malt and Munich malt. http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/15BDunkelweizen


3

John Palmer's book "How to Brew" is an excellent place to start and earlier versions are on line for free. It covers all the bases of brewing with quite a bit of technical information. I use this book as a reference tool all the time. If you want to get into the nuts and bolts of the individual components of brewing try the Brewing Element Series from ...


2

I've tried doing exactly what you describe, without using counter-pressure to fill the growlers. While you can carbonate the beer just fine, at room temperature you'll get so much foaming during transfer (no matter how long your lines are) that it'll probably end up as flat as it was before carbonation by the time you're drinking it. You could try it with ...


2

The problem is the twist-off bottles, not the caps or the capper. You need to use pop-top bottles.


1

You should not rack it to secondary. You can improve clarity with: simply waiting longer in primary for more particulate matter to settle cold-crashing to promote yeast settling clarifying agents like Irish moss, gelatin, clarityferm careful racking


1

I have left beer in primary for over a month due to travel, etc. to no ill effects (assuming proper sanitation - problems will be more apparent given more time to infect). The only issue you may have is while the since the yeast flocculates and can be clearer, much of it will drop out of the wort into the trub. If you are bottle priming, this can cause ...


1

As mentioned, How to Brew by John Palmer is a great book that teaches you the basics, but also allows you to dig into some of the details & more technical aspects of brewing. But don't just read. Listen to The Jamil Show, Brew Strong, Basic Brewing Radio podcasts. They provide a wealth of information.



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