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7

It is impossible to predict YOUR FG. I know nothing about your skill level, your fermentation processes (temp, O2, pitching rates). I know nothing about the yeast you plan to use. I know nothing about the true fermentability of the extract and booster you are using. That said some estimates can be made. In the best of scenarios if we assume a 65% ...


5

The primary benefit of a starter is having the proper number of healthy yeast cells to ferment your wort. By "proper number", we mean about 0.75 million cells per milliliter per degree Plato of wort for ales, and 1.5 million cells/mL/P for lagers. (Consider that smack packs and vials have about 100bn cells when fresh, which is only enough cells for 5gl/19L ...


2

Butter Buds may be a good option for you. (http://www.butterbuds.com/home.html) It has a very buttery flavor. It is fat free which means it won't kill your head retention. While I haven't brewed with it, I have brewed with fat free peanut butter powder for my peanut butter chocolate stout and it worked very well. You should be able to find Butter Buds ...


1

Sulphites are used in a lot of wines, ciders etc and as a general food preservative. So long as you aren't adding more than the directions call for you should be ok, especially if the packing doesn't give you warning. I use it for my wife's wine and cider at 1/4 teaspoon per 5 gallons. If you still want to rinse ensure you use sanitized water or you could ...


1

Step up to larger kits like Coopers or Muntons. Then you can experiment with steeping specialty grains and adding hop to enhance flavor as well as adding some dry malt extract.


1

I'm going to add my vote for Charlie Papazian's New Complete Joy of Homebrewing. I started with it, and have gotten 5 of my friends into the hobby with just that book. I personally started by getting the book, and then reading the first third of it. This covers starting out, extract brewing, and how to do an extract or kit brew from brew day to bottling. ...


1

There's a few smells you should worry about, because you're smelling the liquid. For instance, a vinegary smell (suggests acetobacter infection). There are other smells that you should not worry about, because you're smelling the gas leaving the liquid. For instance, sulphur. Most smells during fermentation are in this category, actually. Remember, you ...



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